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20-21 Bacone College Academic Catalog

24. 2020-2021 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

24.3. AIS - AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES

Some 3-hour courses with an AIS prefix, so designated for any specific academic year, will satisfy the core curriculum requirement in American Indian Studies. In the case of cross-listed courses, students must register under the AIS prefix to receive AIS credit. Cross-listed course numbers, if applicable, are indicated at the end of each description.

 

AIS 1001-1011

Survey of American Indian Affairs I and II

1 Hour

Through individual research and class discussion, students in this course will develop an understanding of the problems of the American Indian in contemporary society.   

                                   

AIS 1103

Introduction to American Indian Studies

3 Hours

Presented from a thematic, multidisciplinary perspective, this course is an introduction to the history, culture, language, literature, arts, politics, and legal status of the indigenous peoples of North America comprised of readings, lectures, discussions, films, and writing assignments. BACONE CORE

 

AIS 1133

Elementary Cherokee I

3 Hours

Elementary Cherokee is a basic language course that introduces students to Cherokee phonology, morphology, and syntax with attention given to the syllabary as well as the spoken language. Elementary Cherokee I acquaints students with basic vocabulary, common phrases, and modern idioms. The course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty.   CROSS-LISTED AS CHE 1113

 

 

AIS 1159

Tribal Languages I

12 Hours

Tribal Language I is a basic language course which introduces students to phonology, morphology, and syntax with attention to the spoken language. This course acquaints the student with basic vocabulary, common phrases, and modern idioms. The subject language is chosen and offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 1213

Survey of American Indian Arts and Crafts

3 Hours

Students will be able to identify American Indian arts and crafts styles from different regions of the country and understand how they have changed over time. Students will learn basic elements of bead work styles, feather work, basketry, and contemporary multimedia art work. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 1413

American Indian Art I

3 Hours

Acquaints the student with the process of painting American Indian subject matter in the flat, two-dimensional style known as Traditional Plains Painting, with emphasis on works by artists of the Bacone School. Students are encouraged to paint their own tribal customs and dress, stressing authenticity and research. Non-Indian students will choose a tribe, area, or ceremonial, do thorough research, and develop paintings from that research.  Independent study and individual expression will be expected. By permission of instructor only. Class 3 hours and studio. CROSS-LISTED AS ART 1413.

 

AIS 1423

American Indian Art II

3 Hours

In this continuation of AIS/ART 1423, the student concentrates on multi-figure composition in water media in the two-dimensional style known as Traditional Indian Painting with particular emphasis on artists of the Bacone School. Prerequisite: AIS or ART 1413. Class 3 hours and studio. CROSS-LISTED AS ART 1423.

 

AIS 2003

American Indian Government

3 Hours

Through a comparative study of American Indian tribal government styles in North America, students will learn the history of tribal government, its forced reorganization under the United States government, and current tribal government structure and theory.

 

AIS 2023

American Indian Mythology

3 Hours

Students in this course will explore the fascinating world of American Indian mythologies. The Subject will go into basic mythologies throughout the world. Students will become familiar with an assortment of American Indian belief systems and what it means to live as a Native America. And will review the various views of Native mythologies like origins, creations, love, heroes and war, and animals, tricksters and the end of the world. The course will enhance a better understanding of Native American philosophies and the relationships with man and his environment around him. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2033

Tribal Studies I

3 Hours

This course will focus on a comprehensive study of a particular tribal culture, including its history, life ways, and culture. Tribal content will be determined by student interest and offered depending on availability of faculty. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2112

American Indian Wellness

2 Hour

An introductory look at the topic of wellness from an American Indian perspective. Particular time and attention will be given to the incorporation of wellness techniques and lifestyle changes that will bring a more balanced and holistic way of life for Bacone College students. The course will explore wellness from many different tribal perspectives and traditions, but will lean heavily upon the Southeastern tribal ways. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2113

American Indian Tribal Government

3 Hour

This course will examine the roles of tribal governments in the formation of internal and external policies affecting the lives of American Indian people, the basis for their political power as it exists historically and how it exists in contemporary society, and government structures and functions.  In particular, the course will focus on the cultural and legal dilemmas posed by tribal governments in contemporary society; how tribal governments have maintained cultural legitimacy in the face of colonial cultural imposition; how tribal governments have articulated and retained their rights in a system of shared sovereignty; and the problems American Indians faced in building stronger political systems as they struggled to maintain and retain tribal sovereignty.

 

 

AIS 2123

American Indian History I

3 Hour

This course offers an introduction to the history of American Indian societies from the late 18th century to the beginning of the 21st century.  It will focus on the major issues and events that defined and shaped Indian peoples’ lives pursuant to the fledgling U.S. government’s liberation from Britain.  The course will explore the dynamics of Indian-European encounters, the impact of Euro-American expansion, the process of removal and the programs to “Americanize” Indian peoples.  Throughout the course, we will examine how Indians struggled to retain a sense of their historic cultures and political autonomy, even as they confronted and adapted to the powerful forces unleashed by Euro-American society.

 

AIS 2133

Comparative American Indian Cultures

3 Hour

This online course examines American Indian tribal cultures at the time of European contact. These include economics, customs, and socio-political structures as demonstrated by a variety of tribes from across the continent. Students will also learn how these forms have evolved over time. AIS 1103 PREREQUISITE – NOT BACONE CORE

 

AIS 2159

Tribal Languages II

12 Hours

This course is a continuation of Tribal Languages I. This course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1153. 

 

AIS 2313

American Indian Art III

3 Hours

This continuation of AIS/ART 1423 focuses on two-dimensional, multi-figure composition in American Indian settings with special emphasis on American Indian symbols and landscape composition in tempera, oil, and acrylic media. Prerequisite: AIS or ART 1423. Class 3 hours and studio.

 

 

 

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AIS 2323

American Indian Art IV

3 Hours

This final course in the American Indian Art sequence concentrates on advanced details of Traditional Indian Painting. Students will plan, research, and execute works of art which best demonstrate their skills in this demanding style. Studio course. Prerequisite AIS 2313.

 

AIS 2333

American Indian Literature

3 Hour

American Indian Literature examines various representative works produced by modern American Indian writers. Readings include poetry, essays, biography, and novels. CROSS-LISTED AS LIT 2333 (LIBERAL ARTS GUIDED ELECTIVE) PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2401

American Indian Dance and Song

1 Hour

Students learn to understand and appreciate two indigenous art forms. In addition to performing dances and songs in public performances on behalf of the college, the class covers the historical significance of tribal contact with other people and its effects on tribal dress, dance, and song. Students also begin to understand the complexity of "what it means to be an Indian" in a diverse, contemporary world. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

 

AIS 2423

Multimedia, Design, and Research

3 Hours

We will look at historical and current portrayals of American Indians in media, including print, film, television and popular culture, and examine how these portrayals have modeled beliefs about and attitudes toward American Indians. In addition, we will use technologies to create multimedia projects, including personal blogs and wikis, digital projects and short films. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2431-3

Special Studies in American Indian Studies

3 Hours

Opportunity for the student to explore more deeply into an area of specific interest and develop capabilities for clarity of statement, investigation, and creative, critical attitude. Areas of study vary from semester to semester depending on student interest. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2513

American Indian Philosophy and Religion

3 Hours

This class examines American Indian world views-different ways of looking at the world and how human cultures explain their relationship with the natural world as a source of spirituality. It will also cover how American Indian beliefs have changed in response to historical circumstances and examine spiritual beliefs in contemporary Indian communities. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2553

Foundations in American Indian Ministry

3 Hours

 

Bacone College was founded to train Christian leaders to serve as preachers and public school teachers among native tribes.  In partial fulfillment of that original goal and purpose, this course will introduce the student to the unique features of ministry in the context of American Indian life and culture.  While each native ministry must be adapted to the customs, beliefs, and language of the specific tribe in which it takes place, this course will introduce the student to the foundational principles of native ministry. Special attention will be given to the practices of contextualization, redemptive analogy, and incarnational ministry as they are utilized in native ministry.  Students will research and become acquainted with current models of ministries that are serving native persons in various places (Prerequisites: MIN Introduction of Christian Ministry and MIN Principles of Biblical Research and Writing)

 

AIS 2613

Addictions in Indian Country

3 Hours

This online course will provide students with accurate information about current and past addictions that American Indians face. Students will learn the different types of addictions that create abuses and other complications in Indian Country. This course will not only discuss alcohol and drug abuse, but expand to addictions that include gambling, eating disorders, and more. The course will discuss the current theories that address "best practices" within the field of addiction. Students will broaden their understanding of American Indian addictions by exploring the historical, political, social justice and other issues associated with successful and unsuccessful approaches to the addictions in Indian Country. AIS 1103 PREREQUISITE – NOT BACONE CORE 

 

AIS 2723

Applied Linguistics for Tribal Languages

3 Hours

This course provides an introduction to the intersection of linguistic research and language revitalization for tribal communities.  It examines the distinction between preservation and revitalization of tribal languages with a focus on how linguistic research can effectively be applied to language learning and teaching.  Emphasis is placed on students learning to use linguistic resources to successfully advance their own language learning or teaching goals. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2733

Curriculum Development for Tribal Languages

3 Hours

This course examines various curriculum models used in immersion teaching and learning for tribal languages and provides students with an opportunity to plan, develop, assess, and utilize instructional materials they develop in an immersion setting.  Emphasis is given to the examination, preparation, integration, and application of appropriate models within specific instructional environments matched to student’s needs, interests, and abilities. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

 

AIS 2743

Teaching Methods for Tribal Languages

3 Hours

This course provides an overview of proven models and best practices for teaching tribal languages. The course will focus on the foundational methods and principles of immersion teaching approaches and language acquisition based on communicative needs; specifically, the course will examine effective application of methods to specific teaching environments for tribal languages. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2913

Contemporary American Indian Affairs

3 Hours

This course surveys the social, political, and religious landscape of the Indian people of North America. After a short historical examination of some of the issues that still affect Indian people today, it looks at the history of treaties, allotment, military actions, boarding schools, and a history of efforts to Christianize the Indian people. It further examines the Indian Reorganization Act and its impact on contemporary tribal government, and ends with contemporary events such as the 1969 occupation of Alcatraz, the 1973 takeover at Wounded Knee, the 1975 Oglala shootout, and the Individual Indian Money lawsuit. PREREQUISITE; AIS 1103

 

AIS 2916

Tribal Language Internship I

12 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide intensive language study and entry-level professional experience in a tribal language program setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at a faculty-approved site for a minimum of 480 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals and current level of ability. Internships may include classroom teaching experience, assisting with administration of a tribal language program, or other professional experience related to language program development and management.  Only sites that can provide a minimum of ten hours a week of intensive language learning for the student are eligible to serve as internship sites. Other site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2926

Tribal Language Internship II

12 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide intensive language study and entry-level professional experience in a tribal language program setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at a faculty-approved site for a minimum of 480 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals and current level of ability. It is strongly recommended that students complete their Tribal Language Internship 2 at the same site that they interned for Tribal Language Internship 1; however, exceptions will be allowed on a case-by-case basis.  Internships may include classroom teaching experience, assisting with administration of a tribal language program, or other professional experience related to language program development and management.  Only sites that can provide a minimum of ten hours a week of intensive language learning for the student are eligible to serve as internship sites. Other site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103, AIS 2916 Tribal Language Internship I

 

AIS 3003

Environmental Issues in Indian Country

3 Hours

This course will deal with contemporary issues with regard to control of environmental resources in Indian reservations and communities, including water quality and distribution, land management, toxic waste cleanup, and wetlands management. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3013

American Indian History I

3 Hours

The dynamics of Indian-European encounters beginning in the early sixteenth century, the impact of Euro-American expansion and the displacement of Indians, Indian resistance, the creation of "Indian Territory" and ultimate removal of Indian tribes west of the Mississippi river. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103 CROSS-LISTED WITH HIS 3013

 

AIS 3023

Oklahoma History

3 Hours

The American frontier in 1840, Indian resistance to American expansion, Indians in the Civil War, railroads and allotment of Indian land, Indians in World War I and II, resurgence of Indian identity and sovereignty in the 20th century. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103 CROSS-LISTED HIS 3113

 

AIS 3033

Tribal Studies II

3 Hours

Continuation of Tribal Studies I. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103 AND AIS 2033

 

 

AIS 3103

American Indian Political Experience

3 Hours

This course examines the development of the political and policy relationship between American Indian nations and the United States government using political, social, economic, and cultural context. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3113

American Indian Cultural Preservation and Museum Science

3 Hours

This course is an introduction to current developments in tribal and non-tribal museums, with special attention to ideology of display and politics of repatriation. The course will address the needs of tribal cultural archives consisting of records, photographs, oral histories, maps, recordings, and physical artifacts. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3123

American Indian Health Management and Services

3 Hours

This course addresses health care systems, policy, and health conditions unique to American Indians. The course examines the historical information about American Indians with emphasis on health, including behavioral health and tribal/Indian health service policy issues. Discussions include traditional medicine and healing, research needs related to American Indian health, and career opportunities in health management and services. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3133

Tribal Economic Development/Tribal Management

3 Hours

This course introduces students to the concepts of tribal economic development and the various issues facing tribal and federal governments. Theories and roles of tribal economic development as it relates to the survival and continuation of tribal governments. Included in this course is the social and political context of American Indian tribal gaming, political relationships between federal and tribal governments, contemporary examples of tribal gaming, sociocultural and economic forces leading to gamin as strategy for economic development, and/or support from Indian and non-Indian communities to tribal gaming. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3153

Tribal Languages III

3 Hours

This course is a continuation of Tribal Languages II. It will consist of conversational practice, vocabulary-building, history, and culture of the tribe. This course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103 AND AIS 3033

 

AIS 3159

Tribal Language III Internship

12 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide intensive language study and entry-level professional experience in a tribal language program setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at a faculty-approved site for a minimum of 480 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals and current level of ability. It is strongly recommended that students complete their Tribal Language Internship 3 at the same site that they interned for Tribal Language Internship 2; however, exceptions will be allowed on a case-by-case basis.  Internships may include classroom teaching experience, assisting with administration of a tribal language program, or other professional experience related to language program development and management.  Only sites that can provide a minimum of ten hours a week of intensive language learning for the student are eligible to serve as internship sites. Other site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected.  PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the Center for Tribal Languages to enroll.  

 

AIS 3203

Indigenous Leadership Principles

3 Hours

This course examines the development of leadership within individuals and explores the influence of leaders within Indigenous Leadership roles.  The course will pay special attention to the role of mid-levels managers in tribal organizations and their ability to work both up, down, and across organizational tribal structures. The challenges of balancing the needs of supervisors, subordinates, colleagues, and citizens will be addressed along with case studies exploring how Indigenous leaders successfully handled challenges and crisis, using Indigenous Leadership models.

 

AIS 3213

Federal Indian Policy

3 Hours

This course presents an overview of major legal principles of federal Indian law, major developments in federal Indian policy, and how they have affected the education of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Three fundamental legal principles of federal Indian law are presented: tribes are independent sovereign governments, separate from the states and the federal government; tribal sovereignty generally extends over a federally recognized geographic territory and over the activities and conduct of tribal and nontribal members within that territory; and tribal sovereignty is inherent and exists unless and until Congress takes it away. Court case examples illustrating these principles are given. Since questions about tribal sovereignty are often viewed as questions of the intent of Congress, acts of Congress concerning treaties, statutes, and public laws are reviewed, along with court case examples. A history of federal Indian education laws and policies traces tribal control from pre-contact through Federal control, state control, and finally to the return toward tribal control.

AIS 3233

American Indian Sovereignty

3 Hours

This course will introduce and consider the concept of sovereignty involving the relationship of tribal people to federal and state governments through historical development of treaties, congressional acts, and court decisions. It will also explore the ways in which Federal Indian law and policy have been significantly influenced through many broad swings in public ideology.

 

`AIS 3243

American Indian Women

3 Hours

This course will examine the historical experience of Native American women with respect to their cultures.  This class pursues ethno history using the cultural framework of Native Communities to interpret the historical record.  Over the course of the semester we will examine gender and gender roles in Native American culture, Indian women in the social structure, historical and contemporary roles, problems and opportunities of contemporary women, the feminist movement and Indian rights, as well as the contributions of Individual native women.   

AIS 4003

Issues in American Indian Education

3 Hours

This course studies the history of Indian education policy and practice in the United States focusing on traditional tribal methods as well as contemporary, federal, state, and tribal programs. Discussions will include cross-cultural differences in learning styles, emphasis on American Indian styles. Other cross-cultural differences will be explored such as socialization needs related to readiness for school. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 4009

Internship

9 Hours

Individualized supervised internship in an appropriate agency, organization, services , or business related to professionalize working with American Indian tribal communities. Involves providing reports for cooperating tribe or agency. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 4013

Internship

3 Hours

The Department of American Indian Studies offers students the ability to experience real life experiential learning through its Internship course.  Internship allows American Indian Studies (AIS) majors and minors to build real-life work experience while applying AIS knowledge in the workforce. AIS Internship allows students to build valuable work experience while getting the chance to work on Native causes with Native people. This course may be used as a capstone course in American Indian Studies. Students will utilize research methods and theory to conduct their own research culminating in a research paper. Professional development aimed to prepare students for graduate studies and careers may also be covered.

 

 

AIS 4159

TRIBAL Language IV Internship

12 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide intensive language study and entry-level professional experience in a tribal language program setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at a faculty-approved site for a minimum of 480 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals and current level of ability. It is strongly recommended that students complete their Tribal Language Internship 4 at the same site that they interned for Tribal Language Internship 3; however, exceptions will be allowed on a case-by-case basis.  Internships may include classroom teaching experience, assisting with administration of a tribal language program, or other professional experience related to language program development and management.  Only sites that can provide a minimum of ten hours a week of intensive language learning for the student are eligible to serve as internship sites. Other site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the Center for Tribal Languages to enroll.

 

AIS 4203

Senior Seminar

3 Hour

This course is the capstone course in American Indian Studies.  Students will utilize research methods and theory to conduct their own research culminating in a research paper.  Professional development aimed to prepare students for graduate studies and careers will also be covered.