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20-21 Bacone College Academic Catalog

Site: Bacone College Online
Course: Bacone College Online
Book: 20-21 Bacone College Academic Catalog
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Date: Friday, November 27, 2020, 2:29 PM

Table of contents

1. Mission Statement and Core Curriulum/Goals

Bacone College Mission Statement

Mission Statement Approved to Be Presented to HLC

As a historic Native American serving institution, Bacone College provides a quality holistic liberal arts educational experience in a culturally diverse environment empowering life-long learners with the knowledge, skills, and capacity to be transformational leaders in both native and non-native communities.

Institutional Education Goals

To fulfill its mission, the College has established education goals stipulating it will provide:

·         Intellectually challenging baccalaureate and associate degree programs that include study in both professional programs and the arts and sciences.

·         A core curriculum, which allows students to demonstrate critical thinking, computer proficiency, computational ability, and self-expression in writing and oral form in understanding and developing new ideas and presenting them to others.

·         The opportunity for students to learn and live in a diverse cultural collegiate community.

·         Emphasis and privilege in its curricular and co-curricular programs to the voice and culture of American Indians as represented in the College's students, staff and faculty.

·         The opportunity for students to experience personal and spiritual growth and to acquire knowledge of Christian values and perspectives.

·         Academic and non-academic support services that facilitate student success.

 

Core Curriculum Goals and Outcomes

The College has adopted the following goals in its core curriculum that all students are required to master: Furthermore, in partially assessing its success in accomplishing its education and core curriculum goals, the college regularly evaluates the outcomes shown below.

Engendering and Seeking Goal 1: Question, doubt, and think, which inspires the search for knowledge and awareness.

  • Students evaluate whether or not a question has validity and value.
  • Students embrace and apply knowledge to alternate conditions.

Engendering and Seeking Goal 2: Develop awareness of how the student himself and how the answers the student seeks fit within the larger picture of life and learning.

  • Students analyze their views of life in relation to varied world views.

 Engendering and Seeking Goal 3: Develop curiosity about material by asking questions.

  • Students examine information for alternative explanations and possible implications.

Seeking and Pondering Goal 1: Learn to combine the subjective and objective, intuition and facts, beliefs and emotions with observations and investigations.

  • Students synthesize and analyze documents to find subjective and objective elements in varying media.
  • Students express the objective and subjective thoughts through writing and speaking.

Seeking and Pondering Goal 2: Develop the initiative to learn issues and topics that help a person better know how he or she relates to the larger community and the natural environment.

  • Students analyze, understand, and express knowledge of world, American, and regional, human and natural history, culture, and institutions.

Seeking and Pondering Goal 3: Support their ideas by evaluating various sources and formats (written, numerical, spoken, and visual) of information.

  • Students apply open minded, analytical approaches to the evaluation of information.
  • Students value and appreciate the richness of multiple literacies and forms of expression, and the limitations of each in contribution to knowledge and understanding.
  • Students adhere to ethical standards in both the analysis and generation of knowledge.

Pondering and Knowing Goal 1:  Use life's many uncertainties to inspire renewed seeking for answers to the many problems that face humans.

  • Students construct probing questions from newly acquired information.
  • Students self-assess their learning by measuring achievement of goals.
  • Students report their progression towards learning goals.

 Pondering and Knowing Goal 2:  Evaluate the current state of knowledge and apply it to solve problems across many disciplines.

  • Students analyze and incorporate information from various sources of media.

 Pondering and Knowing Goal 3:  Apply knowledge to specific problems and circumstances.

  • Students formulate sound methodologies utilizing both quantitative and qualitative analysis to solve problems.
  • Students devise problem solving techniques that work effectively with diverging viewpoints.
  • Students challenge uncertain conclusions, and investigate alternative solutions.

Knowing and Engendering Goal 1:  Engender new questions that will guide lifelong learning and self-discovery.

  • Students create unique questions to existing problems.

 Knowing and Engendering Goal 2:  Develop an awareness of global culture.

  • Students evaluate, interpret, and formulate answers to multifaceted real world issues.
  • Students offer solutions to problems from diverse points of view.

Knowing and Engendering Goal 3:  Develop effective use of research resources and scientific methods.

  • Students review and analyze data.
  • Students categorize relevance of concepts.
  • Students demonstrate the ability to differentiate opinion, theory, and fact.

2. Accreditation and Professional Status

Bacone College is authorized by:

The Oklahoma Regents for Higher Education

State Capitol Complex, 500 Education Bldg., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73105-4500 and is accredited by:

  1. The Higher Learning Commission, 235 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, Illinois 60604-1413 (On Probation)
  2. The Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 N. Wacker Dr., Suite 2850, Chicago, Illinois 60606-3182 (On Probation)
  3. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation, 4545 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 275, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73105-3418
  4. International Accreditation Council for Business Education, P O Box 25217, Overland Park, Kansas 66225, Phone:  913-631-3009

The College is chartered under the laws of the State of Oklahoma, empowered to grant the Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, Bachelor of Arts, and Bachelor of Science degrees, and to provide selected service courses for elective or terminal curricula purposes.


Accreditation means that the standards of the school are such that its academic curriculum is recognized and honored by other member institutions of the Association. It ensures the students a quality program with credits that can be transferred to other institutions.

 

Bacone College is a member of the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), the Oklahoma Independent Colleges and Universities (OICU), the Joint Review Committee on Education and Radiological Technology (JRCERT), the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), and the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE).


3. Campus Police

Bacone College has its own campus police department, which has the same authority and arrest powers as a municipal police department. Each officer is duly sworn and commissioned in accordance with Oklahoma state law and peace officer training standards and may enforce both criminal laws and the rules and regulations of Bacone College. Additional information may be found in Annual Clery Act Disclosure Report, which is distributed annually to all members of the campus community, and is outlined in the latest published revision of the Student Handbook.


4. Affirmative Action

Bacone College, in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and other Federal laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, handicap, or status as a Veteran in any of its policies, practices, or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services. Inquiries regarding admission to the College should be addressed to:

Admissions Office
Bacone College
2299 Old Bacone Road
Muskogee, Oklahoma 74403
1-888-682-5514 or 1-918-683-4581 Ext. 7340
www.bacone.edu e-mail: admissions@bacone.edu


5. History and Heritage

Oklahoma's oldest continuing center of higher education began in 1880. With the help of the American Baptist Home Mission Society, Professor Almon C. Bacone, a missionary teacher, started a school in the Cherokee Baptist Mission at Tahlequah, Indian Territory. The only faculty member, Professor Bacone, enrolled three students and began his work. By the end of the first semester, the student body had quadrupled; by the end of the first year, student population was fifty-six and the faculty numbered three.

Seeing the need to expand, an appeal was made to the Creek Tribal Council for 160 acres of land in Muskogee, the "Indian Capital of the World." The land was granted, and in 1885 Indian University was moved to its present site. In 1910, it was renamed Bacone Indian University after its founder and first president and was later changed to Bacone College.

Classes from first grade through four years of College met in Rockefeller Hall, a three-story building made possible by a $10,000 contribution from John D. Rockefeller. "Old Rock," as it came to be called, served as classroom, dormitory, dining hall, chapel, teacher quarters and administration building. It was razed in 1938 and Memorial Chapel was built in its place.

Professor Bacone dreamed of a school, based on Christian principles, for the education of American Indians. The college has retained its Christian heritage, but is not reserved strictly for American Indians. Its Mission Statement calls for meeting the "needs of American Indians in a multicultural setting." All students, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age or religion are welcomed and encouraged to attend Bacone College. Throughout its history, the College has attracted Indian and non-Indian students. Bacone College attempts to prepare students to function in the mainstream of society, without losing their culture and heritage.

The College has never lost its concern for the individual student. Learning is seen as a way of life that encourages flexibility, breadth of perspective, and respect for the contributions made to the quality of human existence by those of all ages and races. As the student body has grown and the needs of society have become more complex, the curriculum has changed to meet the needs of the students.

The campus contains many reminders of Bacone College's history, tradition, and goals. One of these is a small cemetery, the final resting place of Bacone Presidents Almon C. Bacone (1880-1896) and Benjamin D. Weeks (1918-1941), as well as others associated with the school over the years. Another reminder on the west side of the campus proper is a stone pulpit that marks the spot on which President Bacone and two Baptist missionaries who were also trustees of Indian University, Joseph Samuel Murrow and Daniel Rogers, knelt in prayer to dedicate to the Christian education of American Indians the 160 acres of land received from the Creek Indians.

Today the College offers an opportunity for reflection upon how we, of all races and ethnic backgrounds, can live, study, work, and worship together in order to strive not only for a meaningful educational experience, but for a society committed to Christian values and principles.

 


6. ADMISSIONS OFFICE

General Admission Information

Bacone College invites individuals from a variety of cultures and backgrounds to apply for admittance into its academic programs.  The College operates on a “rolling admissions” format, meaning that Application for Admission Forms may be submitted at any time. Applications may be submitted on-line at www.bacone.edu.  Once received, applications are promptly reviewed and processed by the Office of Admissions.  The admissions committee carefully weighs a variety of factors with each applicant in determining the prospective student’s potential to benefit from the College’s educational programs. 

To schedule a visit or submit academic records, please address all correspondence to:

Admissions Office
Bacone College
2299 Old Bacone Road
Muskogee, Oklahoma 74403
1-888-682-5514 or 1-918-781-7340
www.bacone.edu e-mail: admissions@bacone.edu

6.1. Enrollment Management

Enrollment Management at Bacone College strives to create a streamlined process of recruitment, admission, financial, and academic counseling to fulfill our mission to be student-centered.  Personalized services and individual attention creates a supportive and nurturing environment.  The fundamental concept of building our Christian community begins with our friendly recruitment and admissions counselors and continues with the student throughout their academic career at Bacone College.

Enrollment Management consists of the following departments: Department of Admissions, Department of Financial Aid, International Student Admissions.  Each department works in concert to provide an efficient enrollment experience for all students.


6.2. General Admission Procedures

When possible, prospective students are encouraged to visit the Office of Admissions for assistance in completing the application process. The following procedures are necessary in expediting a prospective student’s application:

Work with Admissions Counselor to complete your application.   Individuals may also meet with the respective dean or director for assistance in applying for acceptance into programs with selective admissions requirements.

Complete and submit the Application for Admission form along with the required non-refundable application fee (See fee schedule). You may also apply online for free.  

Submit sealed official academic transcripts from high school (Seventh semester or final transcripts), GED Testing, ACT or SAT I testing, and all colleges previously attempted.

Upon receipt of all academic records, the Admissions Committee will review the application and will determine admittance into Bacone College.  Students are encouraged to apply for federal financial aid at this time. Please visit www.fafsa.ed.gov to complete the application online.

The student will be notified by a Letter of Admittance.  Enclosed will be the Intent to Accept Admissions form to be completed by the student and returned with the new student enrollment fee (See fee schedule).

The Office of Admissions will forward the student’s file to the Financial Aid Office.


6.3. Admissions Standards

The Office of Admissions will offer a Letter of Admittance to applicants who have a completed Admission’s file and have met the minimum standards of admissions established by Bacone College.  Established minimum requirements are defined as:

High School Graduates:   Grade Point Average of 2.0 or higher, ACT composite of a 18 (SAT I= 860, and Class Rank of top 50%.

Non-Traditional High School Graduates:   GED score= 50 (500 on new tests), ACT composite of 18 (SAT= 860).  Students who are Home Schooled must have an ACT composite of 18 (SAT=860).

College Transfer:  12 Earned Hours or more- 2.0 GPA Cumulative.


6.4. Recommended High School Courses:

The following courses are recommended to high school students in preparation for college-level studies.

YEARS

UNITS/COURSE AREAS

 

4

English (Grammar, Composition, Literature)

2

Lab Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics or any lab science with the exception of General Science with or without a lab; Applied Biology/Chemistry or Principles of Technology may be substituted for one of the lab science courses)

3

Mathematics (from Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Trigonometry, Math Analysis, Calculus) or 2 years of applied Mathematics and Algebra II

2

History

1

Citizenship Skills (from Economics, Geography, Government, Non-Western Culture)

3

Additional units (Foreign Language, Speech, Economics, Geography, Government, Psychology, Sociology)

15

Units

Students who have deficiencies in these high school course recommendations may be required to remove these deficiencies within the first 24 credit hours of enrollment. The student’s standardized test scores and high school transcripts determine whether or not additional, preparatory course work will be required. Additional testing may be performed by the respective academic division.


6.5. College Transfer Students

A transfer student is an undergraduate student with more than 6 attempted college credit hours, excluding developmental (0-level) courses and credit hours accumulated by concurrently enrolled high school students.  A student, with 6 or fewer attempted college credit hours, excluding remedial (0-level) courses, is considered a first-time entering student.

Students transferring in under 30 credit hours must also submit their high school transcript, ACT or SAT I scores. Transfer students will follow the General Admission Procedures listed earlier in this section.


6.6. International Students

Students from nations outside of the United States are welcomed at Bacone College. Admissions counselors are happy to assist with the necessary steps required to study in this country. Application procedures for international students are as follows:

Complete and submit the Online Application for Admission form along with the required application fee.

Submit official copies of all secondary, college and university work, including examination scores in English. All documentation must be submitted with a Review of Credentials from an approved agency. Official TOEFL scores of 500 (paper based Exam), 173 (Computer Based Exam), or 61 (Internet Based Exam) successful completion of 12 weeks of study, or achievement of Level 9 at an approved English Language Center are required of applicants from nations in which English is not the official or spoken language. International applicants from nations where English is the official language are required to submit official ACT or SAT I scores meeting established admission criteria.

Submit affidavit of support and official bank statements.

The Office of Academic Affairs reviews international applications for admission. If accepted; international students must submit a $7,500 deposit in US currency and have a US sponsor guarantee the cost of one academic year. Upon receipt of the deposit and guarantee, a SEVIS I-20 and Letter of Admittance will be issued to the student. The SEVIS I-20, Letter of Admittance, bank statements, transcripts, passport and other supporting documentation must be presented to the nearest American Embassy or U. S. Consulate for processing. To remain “in-status” as an F-1 student, international students must follow all regulations pertaining to the issuance of the SEVIS I-20 as stipulated by the U. S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and Bacone College. International students are required to pay all charges (including tuition, room, board, fees) prior to the start of each semester.

All International students shall be required to take a full course load (12 credits) and be residential students. International students may appeal to the President for exceptions to these requirements as allowed by immigration statues.


6.7. GED Recipients

Students without a high school diploma who have received a GED diploma are also eligible to apply for admission.  In addition to the General Admissions Procedures, GED recipients are required to submit:

Bacone College Admissions Application.

Official high school transcripts covering time spent in high school.

Official GED transcript.

Official ACT or SAT I transcript.


6.8. Non-High School Graduates

Application and acceptance arrangements may be made through the Office of Admissions for students without a high school diploma or GED.  Admissions counselors will assist with the admissions process.  The College will follow the federal guidelines for documentation of Ability to Benefit.

Special Non-Degree-Seeking Students and Auditing Courses

Students who wish to enroll in courses without intending to pursue a degree may be permitted to enroll in up to 9 credit hours by making application in the Office of Admissions.  Once a student has completed 9 credit hours, and wishes to enroll in additional course work, the student must make formal application into the College.  Students wishing to audit a course for no credit need to complete an Application for Admission in the Office of Admissions.


6.9. Concurrent Enrollment

High school juniors or seniors may be admitted to Bacone College provided they meet the following requirements:

Meet the published criteria of Bacone College for admission.

  • Be enrolled in fewer than 6 credit courses per semester at their high school, which can be validated by their high school principal.
  • Be eligible to complete requirements for graduation from their high school no later than the spring of their senior year, which can be validated by their high school principal.
  • Junior and senior high school students are required to have a composite ACT score of 18, or a combined SAT I score of 860, or a 3.00 cumulative high school GPA.

A high school student who is admitted to Bacone College as a Concurrent Enrollment Student may enroll in a combined number of high school and college courses for each semester. Their full-time college and high school workload cannot exceed 19 college semester credit hours. To calculate the total workload, each high school credit is the equivalent of 3 college semester credit hours. Add up the college semester credit hours and the high school equivalent credits together to find the total.

An exceptional student who meets the above criteria may enroll in a maximum of 6 credit hours during a summer session or the term following the junior year in high school without being concurrently enrolled in high school during the summer term.

Students who have participated in a concurrent program other than Bacone College, must provide an official College transcript to the Office of the Registrar before credits can be transferred.


6.10. Special Program with Selective Admissions Requirements - Bachelors in Elementary Education

      

To review the list of admissions requirements, please refer to the specific degree information under Academic Programs.


6.11. Academic Records

The Office of Admissions must receive all official academic records in a sealed envelope.  Any records submitted to the college that have been opened or copied will not be accepted as official. 

Once submitted, academic records and transcripts become a permanent part of the applicant's/student’s records at Bacone College and will not be returned.  When students require additional copies of academic records from institutions other than Bacone College, the student must contact the issuing institution.


6.12. When Background Checks Are Required of Student Applicants

The college requires background checks for applicants who (1) declare that they have been arrested or convicted of any Federal, state, local or tribal law offense and (2) when any student who declares a major in healthcare, education, health-science or criminal justice related fields. In regards to this policy, there is no distinction between main campus residential students, commuter students, or dually-enrolled tribal college students.  


Background checks are conducted through a third-party vendor and include a seven-year scope, nationwide wants and warrants check, statewide wants and warrants check, debarment check (for Federal funds), sex offender and registry check. Moving violations are not considered during the background check process. Minor offenses (such as youthful experimentation with marijuana, public intoxication, DUI without injury to a third party) are presumptively waived. More serious violations may be waived by special permission of the President. These checks are required of students who declare that they have been arrested or convicted of any Federal, state, local or tribal law offense to ensure that there are no terms and conditions of probation that would prevent them from attending Bacone College, that there are no outstanding criminal proceedings, and to ensure that Bacone meets its due diligence requirements under VAWA and Title IX. 

 

These checks are also required of students declaring a major in healthcare, education, health-science or criminal justice related fields because the state licensing boards for these fields require a background check as a condition of licensing. This process is a safeguard to ensure that students are not enrolled who are subsequently unable to pass licensing examinations due to adverse criminal history. 


6.13. Transfer Probation

Transfer students who were academically suspended at another institution may make a formal request for admission on probationary status to the Admissions Office and the Office of Academic Affairs. 

6.14. Re-Admission after Absence

Students who have attended Bacone College previously, but have not attended in the past academic year, must re-submit an Application for Admission.  If the student has attended any other college in the meantime, official transcripts of the college work attempted since the last date of attendance must also be submitted.  A student who was not enrolled in Bacone College for one academic year and was not a candidate for graduation will return under the policies stated in the current catalog.


6.15. Leave of Absence Status

A student, who finds it necessary to leave Bacone College voluntarily due to personal or professional reasons, may apply for Leave of Absence Status (LOAS) of up to 180 days in a 12-month period.  LOAS assures the student of readmission to the College without further paperwork or review by Admissions. Upon return, the student may continue his/her academic studies by retaking the specific courses previously enrolled in, or their equivalent in total credit hours, at no additional expense.  In addition, the student may choose to re-enter the College under the academic catalog in effect at the time the LOAS was granted or may elect to enter under the current catalog. Students under full-time study may change to a later catalog at any time.

The Office of Financial will explain to a student that is a Title IV, HEA program loan recipient, the effect that failure to return from the leave may have on the student's loan repayment term. A student requesting a Leave of Absence Status must submit a completed, signed, and dated LOAS application prior to the requested leave time.

The LOAS application is available online at www.Bacone.edu as well as at the Office of Academic Affairs and the Registrar's Office and must be approved by the Office of Academic Affairs. The College’s Business Office will approve the disposition of the student’s financial obligations (if any) at the time of application for LOAS. (Tuition and fees are the only expense reassigned to the next full-term semester. Room and Board charges are exempt from the LOAS Policy, and follows the tuition refund time frame as stated in the Bacone College Catalog.) “LA” will appear on the student’s transcript designating the Leave of Absence Status.


6.16. Academic Suspension Policy

Academic Suspension Policy

Students who are suspended from the College for academic reasons are prohibited from having access to the campus and campus-sponsored events for the duration of the suspension. Appeals for academic suspensions must be made in writing submitted to the Office of Academic Affairs.

Re-Admission after Academic Suspension from Bacone College

Students under academic suspension at Bacone College will not be re-admitted for at least one full semester subsequent to the date of academic suspension. Students wishing to appeal the decision may do so by submitting a letter of appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs.  Student admission after suspension will be probationary. 

Students must submit the following items after suspension:

Application for Admissions.

Official transcripts of any college work attempted since the date of suspension.


7. OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID

Office of Financial Aid Mission Statement

The Office of Financial Aid is dedicated to assisting all students in finding the financial means necessary for the attainment of their educational goals. We are committed to creating a friendly, Christian-focused, professional and effective customer service environment to better serve American Indian and other students and the Bacone College community.

7.1. Financial Aid Regulations

Bacone College's financial aid program is designed around the federal system of need-based student aid to ensure that all qualified and motivated Americans have the financial means to pursue higher education at Bacone College. Our present configuration of federal, state and tribal grants, work-study, and loan programs was designed to offer all qualified students a chance to advance their minds, skills, and economic potential, while also providing for the betterment of society. We are committed to working with students and families to make higher education affordable. Most federal and state educational assistance is based on financial need as determined by the information provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Financial need is the difference between the cost of attending Bacone College and the Estimated Family Contribution (EFC). The EFC is calculated using formulas prescribed by the U.S. Department of Education. The applicant must have a high school diploma, GED, or demonstrate the ability to benefit in order to receive financial aid at the institution to which he/she is applying according to the guidelines set forth by the Department of Education.

Some additional requirements for financial aid are:

  • Students must maintain a cumulative 1.60 grade point average (GPA) for the first 30 credit hours attempted.
  • Students must maintain a cumulative 1.80 grade point average (GPA) for the 31-60 credit hours attempted.
  • Students must maintain a cumulative 2.0 grade point average (GPA) for the 61 or more credit hours attempted.
  • Students must successfully complete at least 67% of all attempted course hours. Withdrawals,  I,  F, and other unsatisfactory grades are examples of grades that will be counted against the completion rate.
  • Federal Regulations require a Title IV Funds calculation must be completed for any recipient of Title IV grant or loan assistance that receives all "F's" for a semester and does not post attendance in any of their enrolled classes for at least 60% of a particular semester.

Audit courses do not qualify for financial aid. Should a student receive financial aid for any classes, or hours, which are later changed to audit, the student will be required to repay any applicable financial aid funds.


7.2. Financial Aid Application Process

1.      Apply for admission to Bacone College.

2.      Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible after January 1st of each year. FAFSA forms are filed electronically on the Internet at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Bacone College's school code for the FAFSA is 003147.

3.      Respond promptly to any correspondence requesting additional information. For example: Federal Tax Transcripts, Student Data Forms, Verification Worksheets, etc.

4.      If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the Financial Aid Office at the number listed below:

            Office of Financial Aid
            Bacone College
            2299 Old Bacone Road
            Muskogee, Oklahoma 74403-1597

            TOLL FREE: 888-682-5514
            918-781-7474
            e-mail:  finaid@Bacone.Edu


7.3. Federal and State Grant Aid

The Federal Pell Grant is based on financial need and is available to undergraduate students only. The award amounts can change yearly. The amount that a student can receive is based not only on the financial need but also the cost of attendance and the enrollment status as full-time or part-time.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): $500 per year

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are offered to full-time undergraduate students with demonstrated exceptional need as determined by the FAFSA. Awards are based on the student's FAFSA application date and are made to Pell-eligible students who have submitted all requested documentation. Funds are limited, and students are encouraged to apply early and submit requested documents (such as tax transcripts) in a timely manner. Students must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress to be eligible for FSEOG.


7.4. Oklahoma Tuition Aid Grant (OTAG)

Up to $1,300 per year      

OTAG is a financial-need based grant available to Oklahoma residents only. Students automatically apply for it by completing a FAFSA, and must be enrolled at least half time. Students who have listed Bacone College on their FAFSA are selected by Oklahoma State Regents and reported to us. The Oklahoma State Regents may change the FAFSA completion deadline based on the amount of funds available and the number of students eligible for awards. Students who complete the FAFSA after March 31st may not receive funds from this program.


7.5. Oklahoma Tuition Equalization Grant (OTEG)

Up to $2,000 per year  

OTEG is also a financial need based grant available to Oklahoma residents only. There are specific rules for this grant and they are dictated by the Oklahoma State Regents.  Students automatically apply for it by completing a FAFSA, and must be enrolled full-time. The Regents direct Bacone College on criteria and awarding practices.


7.6. Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP)

$181 per credit hour   

OHLAP is a unique program set by the Oklahoma Legislature for eighth-, ninth- and tenth-grade students. Below are some of the requirements:

Oklahoma resident; Enrolled in the eighth, ninth or 10th grade in an Oklahoma high school; student’s parents, custodians or guardians earn less than $50,000 per year.  For the 2020-2021 year, the amount awarded for OHLAP students at Bacone College was $181 per credit hour (per credit dollar amount is coming from the OK State Regents Office).


7.7. Federal Work Study (FWS)

Up to $1600 per year

The FWS program is a financial need based program that provides part-time jobs on campus to help students earn money to pay for school. Students are paid at least minimum wage, and the financial aid office determines the yearly amount awarded to the student. The FWS program encourages community service and helps students gain valuable work experience while paying for their education.


7.8. Veterans Education Benefits

Bacone College is approved to train students under all chapters of GI Bill®[1] benefits including VA Vocational Rehabilitation and the Post 9/11 GI Bill®. The VA Certifying Official, located in the Registrar’s Office at the Welcome Center, will provide information and assistance in the proper completion of all forms. When all required forms and documents have been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, students eligible for VA education benefits will be certified to the VA promptly. Students must request certification for every semester in which they enroll and want to receive their VA education benefits.

To research exactly what benefit you may be eligible to receive, or if you are eligible for more than one chapter of benefits, which benefit is your best option, or to find in-depth information about the various chapters, go to the GI Bill® website: ww.gibill.va.gov.

If students wish to contact the VA Regional Processing Office in Muskogee, OK, the following are toll free telephone numbers at which they can contact the VA directly: Call 1-888-GIBILL1 with questions concerning your VA education benefits, or call 1-800-827-1000, with questions pertaining to all other Veterans benefits.

Students utilizing VA education benefits must turn in all previous transcripts and training records to be evaluated for prior credit, whether or not prior credit is granted.

Students utilizing VA education benefits may be in debt to the VA for withdrawing or being dismissed from courses early.

To research exactly what benefit you may be eligible to receive, or if you are eligible for more than one chapter of benefits, which benefit is your best option, or to find in-depth information about the various chapters, go to the GI Bill®[2] website: ww.gibill.va.gov.

If students wish to contact the VA Regional Processing Office in Muskogee, OK, the following are toll free telephone numbers at which they can contact the VA directly: Call 1-888-GIBILL1 with questions concerning your VA education benefits, or call 1-800-827-1000, with questions pertaining to all other Veterans benefits.

For All Students Using Veterans Benefits

You must notify the Bacone College Veteran Student Certifying Official in the Registrar’s Office of the following:

  • Adds
  • Drops
  • Withdrawals
  • Cancelled courses
  • Degree changes
  • Major changes
  • Non-attendance
  • Repeated courses

Failure to notify the Bacone College Veteran Student Certifying Official of changes could result in delays in your payments from the VA or an overpayment which will require you to reimburse the VA for paid courses.

Services for Students

VA benefits-eligible students are encouraged to use other campus services and programs including advisement, tutoring, and Veterans Administration paid work-study.


7.9. Tribal Grant Aid

Tribal Grants: Higher ED Grants are provided to supplement financial assistance to eligible American Indian/Alaska Native students entering college seeking a baccalaureate degree. The Higher Education Grant Program is not an entitlement program. Students do not automatically receive funding because they are American Indian/Alaska Native. Students must meet certain criteria in order to apply for a Higher ED Grant. Bacone College receives tribal grants from over 25 different Indian tribes. All American Indian students are encouraged to apply with their respective tribes. Contact your tribes Higher Education Office or Administrator to apply for tribal scholarships and grants. You must be an enrolled tribal member in order to be considered for tribal assistance.  If you are not enrolled, contact the particular tribal government and apply for enrollment.  Bacone College recognizes both federal and state recognized tribes.  Below is a partial listing of tribes whose students have attended Bacone College: 

 

 

Oklahoma Tribes

 

Absentee Shawnee Tribe

(405) 275-4030

Fax (405) 275-1922

Ft. Sill Apache Tribe

(580) 588-2298

Fax (580) 588-3133

Peoria Tribe of Indians OK

(918) 540-2535

Fax (918) 540-2538

Alabama

(405) 452-3987

Fax (405) 452-3968

Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma

(405) 547-2402

Fax (405) 547-5294

Ponca Nation

(580) 762-8104

Fax (580) 762-2743

Apache Tribe

(405) 247-9493

Fax (405) 247-2686

Kaw Nation of Oklahoma

(580) 269-2552

Fax (580) 269-2301

Quapaw Tribe

(918) 542-1853

Fax (918) 542-4694

Caddo Tribe

(405) 656-2344

Fax (405) 656-2892

Kialegee Tribal Town

(405) 452-3262

Fax (405) 452-3413

Sac & Fox Nation

(918) 968-3526

Fax (918) 968-1142

Cherokee Nation

(918) 456-0671

Fax (918) 458-5580

Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma

(405) 964-2075

Fax (405) 964-6211

Seminole Nation

(405) 257-6287

Fax (405) 257-6205

Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribe

(405) 262-0345

Fax (405) 262-6872

Kiowa Tribe

(580) 654-2300

Fax (580) 654-2188

Seneca-Cayuga Tribes

(918) 542-6609

Fax (918) 542-3684

Chickasaw Nation

(580) 436-2603

Fax (580) 436-4287

Miami Nation

(918) 542-1445

Fax (918) 542-7260

Shawnee Tribe

(918) 542-2441

Fax (918) 542-2922

Choctaw Nation

(580) 924-8280

Fax (580) 924-1150

Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma

(918) 542-1190

Fax (918) 542-5415

Thlopthlocco Tribal Town

(918) 623-2620

Fax (918) 623-1810

Citizen Potawatomi

(405) 275-3121

Fax (405) 275-0198

Muscogee Creek Nation

(918) 732-7600

Fax (918) 758-1434

Tonkawa Tribe

(580) 628-2561

Fax (580) 628-3375

Comanche Nation

(580) 492-4988

Fax (580) 492-3796

Osage Tribe

(918) 287-5432

Fax (918) 287-2257

United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees (918) 431-1818

Fax (918) 431-1873

Delaware Nation

(405) 247-2448

Fax (405) 247-6329

OTOE-Missouria Tribe

(580) 723-4466

Fax (580) 723-4273

Wichita & Affiliated Tribes

(405) 247-2425

Fax (405) 247-2430

Delaware Tribe of Indians

(918) 336-5272

Fax (918) 337-5513

Ottawa Tribe

(918) 540-1536

Fax (918) 542-3214

Wyandotte Nation

(918) 678-2297

Fax (918) 678-2944

Eastern Shawnee Tribe

(918) 666-2435

Fax (918) 666-2186

Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma

(918) 762-3621

Fax (918) 762-6446

Yuchi (Euchee) Tribe

(918) 224-3065

Fax (918) 224-3065

 

 

Out-of-State Tribes

 

Mississippi Band of Choctaws

(601) 650-7409

Fax: (601) 650-7413

 

Seminole Tribe of Florida

(877) 592-6537

Fax: (954) 893-8856

 

 

Chehalis Tribe

(360) 273-5911

Fax: (360) 273-5914

 

Eastern Band of Cherokee

(828) 497-4222

Fax: (828) 497-9750

 

 

Virginia Tribes

Chickahominy, Eastern Division (aka Eastern Chickahominy Indian Tribe)

(804) 966-7815

Monacan Indian Nation (formerly Monacan Indian Tribe of Virginia)

(434) 946-0389

Nansemond Indian Tribal Association

Refer to website

Pamunkey Nation

Refer to website

Rappahannock Indian Tribe (formerly United Rappahannock Tribe)

(804) 769-0260

The Upper Mattaponi Indian Tribe (formerly Upper Mattaponi Indian Tribal Association)

(804) 769-0041

 

 

 

 


7.10. Types of Loans offered at Bacone College

Effective July 1, 2010 the William D Ford Federal Direct Loan program became the sole provider of Federal Direct Stafford and PLUS loans at Bacone College. Direct Loans are low-interest loans for students and parents to help pay for the cost of a student's education after high school. The lender is the U.S. Department of Education (hereinafter will be called "the Lender") rather than a bank or other financial institution.

Students and/or parents borrow directly from the federal government and have a single contact-the Direct Loan Servicing Center-for everything related to the repayment of your loans, even if you receive Direct Loans at different schools.

Students have online access to your Direct Loan account information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at Direct Loans on the web at www.dl.ed.gov.  Students can choose from several repayment plans that are designed to meet the needs of almost any borrower, and you can switch repayment plans if your needs change.

If you have previously borrowed a federal Stafford, PLUS, or Graduate PLUS loan through a private lender in the FFELP loan program (Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Citibank, Sallie Mae, Discover, etc.,) they will no longer be offering loans and you will need to sign a new Master Promissory Note (MPN) with the Direct Loan program.

The Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan is federally-sponsored “need-based” loan. The federal government pays the interest while you are enrolled at least half time, during the "grace period", and authorized periods of deferment. Interest begins to accrue when you enter repayment.

The Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is a federally-sponsored loan which has no interest subsidy. The interest accrues from the date of disbursement. You may pay the interest while you are enrolled or defer the interest. Accrued interest will capitalize once when you enter repayment. Students are encouraged to make the interest payments while in school to help decrease the total costs of the loan.

Go to the Direct Loan website at https://studentloans.gov for more information including completing the Master Promissory Note (MPN) and signing using your FAFSA PIN.
New borrowers must electronically sign the Master Promissory Note before we will certify your loan(s) with the lender.

Complete the ENTRANCE COUNSELING at https://studentloans.gov.  All new student loan borrowers must complete Entrance Counseling before Stafford Loan funds will be certified for disbursement.

Fees, Interest and Repayment:

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS: As of July 1, 2018, the interest rate on a new Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan is a fixed 5.05%.

For ANY students who borrow an Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan, the interest rate is a fixed 5.05%.

You may pay up to 1.0% in loan fees.

For loans disbursed prior to July 1, 2006, the interest rate continues to be variable based on the 91-day T-bill.

Repayment begins six months from the date of graduation, withdrawal, or enrollment less than half time. There is no pre-payment penalty.

Important Information:

Academic year loans are disbursed in equal increments, one each semester or term.

You are required to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) in order to receive the Federal Stafford Loan. Undergraduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA 2.0 or better; Furthermore, you must earn the credits for your enrollment/funding status. This is a brief synopsis only; you are required to read and understand the entire Bacone College SAP policy.

Direct Loan Servicing

This is your site for managing your account, view your account balances and payment history, enroll in electronic services, make online payments and change your billing options. Also 1098-E tax information and loan consolidation.

Manage My Direct Loan

This site is your source for information from the U.S. Department of Education about how to manage your student loans. It is also the site to sign the Master Promissory Note and Complete Entrance Counseling. Information on repayment plans and calculators, loan discharge, public service and teacher loan forgiveness programs are available.

National Student Loan Database System (NSLDS)

This site is an excellent resource to help you track the principal and outstanding aggregate limit on your entire FFELP and Direct Stafford Loan borrowing history.

Refund

This site offers financial literacy information, creating a budget using EdWise, information on repayment and loan forgiveness programs and your right and responsibilities as a loan borrower.

Deferments

The Office of Financial Aid is required to ensure student loan lenders are updated several times a year with current enrollment status. If you borrowed a loan at another school and now would like your previous loan deferred, please contact your previous lender. If they request Bacone College to complete a Deferment Form, you may submit the form to the Registrar’s Office that will verify your current enrollment status at Bacone College. Deferment forms can be obtained from your lender, and may be available for download from their website.

Repayment

Once you graduate or drop below half-time, you have a one-time six month "grace period" before repayment begins. If you are not able to make the scheduled payments, contact your lender for a deferment, forbearance, or to discuss other repayment plans.

Achieving Your Financial Goals - Paying It Back:

When borrowing student loans, it is the borrower's responsibility to ensure the loan is paid back in accordance with the terms detailed in the Master Promissory Note. Bacone College has partnered with lenders and guarantors to develop a comprehensive default prevention plan. If you are delinquent in repayment, the College, the lender, and the guarantor will contact you to reestablish satisfactory payment arrangements.

Defaulting on a federal student loan is very serious and could have costly consequences such as:

  • Negative Credit History
  • Wage Garnishment
  • Higher Interest Rates on Future Purchases
  • Denied Consumer Loans and Loss of Eligibility of Future Financial Aid
  • Stress
  • Collection costs
  • Offset paid out of federal tax returns, state tax returns, lottery winnings, and other federal and state funds
  • Academic Year Borrowing Limits by Class Standing

Dependent Students

Class Standing

Cumulative Credits Earned

Base Stafford Loan Eligibility
(Subsidized and Unsubsidized)

Additional Unsubsidized
Stafford Loan Eligibility

Freshman

0-30 credits

$3500

$2000

Sophomore

31-60 credits

$4500

$2000

Junior

61-90 credits

$5500

$2000

Senior or 2nd BA

91+ credits

$5500

$2000

 

Independent Students and Dependent Students Whose Parents Are PLUS Denied

Class Standing

Cumulative Credits Earned

Base Stafford Loan Eligibility
(Subsidized and Unsubsidized)

Additional Unsubsidized
Stafford Loan Eligibility

Freshman

0-30 credits

$3500

$6000

Sophomore

31-60 credits

$4500

$6000

Junior

61-90 credits

$5500

$7000

Senior or 2nd BA

91+ credits

$5500

$7000

 

Aggregate Lifetime Limits

Category

Maximum Stafford Loan Eligibility

Dependent Undergraduate

$31,000 (no more than $23,000 of which may be subsidized)

Independent Undergraduate

$57,500 (no more than $23,000 of which may be subsidized)


Federal Direct Parent Loans: The Parent Loan is an unsubsidized loan; interest begins to accrue when the student (the parent) receives the first loan disbursement. The Federal Direct Parent (PLUS) Loan interest rate, which is set by the federal government, is fixed at 7.6% for loans disbursed after July 1, 2018. The federal government charges Parent Loan borrowers a 4.29% origination fee; however, 1.5% of the fee is rebated up front when the loan is disbursed. For example, if a parent borrows $5,000, the student will receive $4,875 ($5,000 X .025 = $125). When loan repayment begins, parents must make the first 12 loan payments on time or the amount rebated will be charged back to the total loan amount.

Private Collegiate Loans or Alternative Loans: This type of loan is available to students who have utilized all their loan eligibility for the subsidized and unsubsidized loans. It also provides a dependent student with an alternative if the Parent Plus Loan has been denied. There are several alternative loans that are available for students, and each lender dictates its own rules and regulations. For example, the Wells Fargo Collegiate Loan Program is available for U.S citizens, permanent residents and international students who are temporary residents. The loan is based on positive credit histories, and a co-signer is required. Origination fees are determined by the private loan lender(s), and the annual loan amount may vary between $1,000 and $25,000 but cannot exceed the cost of education. The interest rate is variable, is determined by the lender, and begins upon disbursement. The financial aid office certifies the loan amount a student can receive.

Assistance From Other Sources: Other sources of state and federal financial assistance are available to qualified students including Vocational Rehabilitation, Veterans education benefits, Workforce Oklahoma, and assistance from the Department of Human Services. Students are encouraged to contact the appropriate government office in their community for more information about these programs.

Helpful Websites for Scholarship Search

Below is a list of websites that can be used for scholarship search:

www.wiredscholarship.com
www.fastweb.com
www.smexpress.com
www.collegenet.com
www.spiritfund.com


7.11. Change of Major or Second Degree

Students who change their major or course of study are advised to try to complete their degree or certificate in a reasonable, prescribed amount of time in order to retain eligibility for financial aid. All students enrolled in an eligible degree program may attempt 150% of the hours required in pursuit of that degree or certificate.

Students who have a degree and are pursuing a second degree of the same type are required to meet with an advisor in the new major to establish what classes are needed to complete the new degree. Students can only receive financial aid for up to 150% of these hours.


7.12. Financial Aid Probation - Transfer Students

The Office of Admissions reviews academic transcripts for all transfer students.  Transfer students with no grade history at Bacone College are placed on financial aid probation their first semester of attendance if the transcript shows that the minimum requirements shown below have not been met. Transfer students admitted on financial aid probation are eligible to receive financial assistance their first semester of attendance. Continuation of financial aid eligibility beyond the first semester of attendance will be approved only if the requirements in chapter 7.13 are met.


7.13. Satisfactory Academic Progress

Academic Progress – Satisfactory (policy revised 12-22-16)

Bacone College requires that all of its students make satisfactory academic progress toward a degree in order to remain eligible as an enrolled student. Satisfactory academic progress is also necessary for students applying for and receiving assistance through the Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, Federal Work Study, Oklahoma Tuition Aid Grant (OTAG), and Oklahoma Tuition Equalization Grant (OTEG) Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP), Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan, Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Direct Parent PLUS Loan programs and VA education benefits. .  Bacone College students must meet THREE requirements to maintain their enrollment and, if applicable, financial aid eligibility:

  •  Students are required to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average, and
  •  Students are required to complete (pass) a certain percentage of hours they attempt, and
  •  Students must complete their degree within a timely manner.

These three requirements are summarized in the following charts. Failure to meet these minimum academic standards can result in the loss of continued enrollment and financial aid eligibility. Students are expected to know, based on this Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy, when they may be placed on warning, probation, or suspension. Satisfactory academic progress is reviewed at the end of each academic semester once grades have been posted.

1) Grade Point Average Requirement - Each student must meet a minimum cumulative grade point average to remain eligible for continued enrollment and federal student aid.

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy Requirements

Undergraduate Students

Total Hours Attempted from all Institutions

1-30 Credit Hours

31-60 Credit Hours

61 or more Credit Hours

Minimum Cumulative GPA Requirements

1.60 GPA

1.80 GPA

2.0 GPA

 

2) Satisfactory Completion of Semester Hours Requirement - Students must also successfully complete and pass 67% of all courses they attempt. Grades of A, B, C, D, F, P, S, W, AW, WP, WF, I, N, NA, NP, X, and U are all considered attempted hours. All transfer hours are included in this calculation.

 

Percentage of cumulative attempted hours a student must complete to remain eligible for Federal Student Aid

 Undergraduate Students

Students must successfully complete:

67% of all attempted hours

 

3) Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion - Students must complete their degree program within an allotted time frame to remain eligible for financial aid. The chart below indicates the time frame in which a degree must be acquired. Be aware that hour limits are cumulative; therefore, all hours from all institutions attended will be included, even if a student did not receive federal student aid. For financial aid purposes grades of A, B, C, D, F, P, S, W, AW, WP, WF, I, N, NA, NP, X, and U are all considered attempted hours. Once students reach their maximum time frame for their specified degree, they are no longer eligible for federal student aid.

 

 Attempted Hours Allowed for Earning a Degree

186 HOURS - First Bachelor's Degree

 

Repeated Coursework - Title IV funds may only pay for one repeat of a previously passed course. More than one repeated course will not be calculated in your enrollment status pertaining to Title IV funds.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Evaluation

Satisfactory Academic Progress is evaluated at the conclusion of each academic semester after grades have been posted. All attempted and transfer hours are counted during this evaluation.

  • Warning is given to students for one semester who do not meet either requirement #1 or #2 shown above. This is a warning status and students can continue enrollment and receive financial aid during their next semester of attendance. Note: A warning is not given to students regarding maximum time frame, it is the student's responsibility to know how many hours they have attempted and where they stand.
  • Suspension will be required for any students who fail to meet either requirement #1 or #2 at the conclusion of their warning semester. Students cannot receive funds from the aid programs listed above while suspended.
  • Probation will be required for all students who appeal their suspension and the appeal is granted.  Probation is contingent upon the student making satisfactory academic progress.  Failure to meet academic progress standards will result in suspension.  Continued probation may be necessary for students who are making significant progress but still unable to meet the standards set above.
  •  Rules are applied uniformly to all students.


7.14. Appeal of Suspension

A student with extenuating circumstances may appeal a suspension by submitting a typed appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs AND the Office of Financial Aid (if applicable). Appeals must explain in detail why the student failed to meet the minimum academic standards, what extenuating circumstances caused the failure, and how the situation has since improved. Examples of extenuating circumstances include illness, medical issues with immediate family members, or a death in the family.

Personal or financial issues with family, friends, or roommates are not considered extenuating circumstances. A student's typed appeal should include:

  • The reason(s) why the student failed to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress.
  •  Supporting documentation that may be pertinent to the student's appeal.
  •  An academic plan for success. (Details will be outlined in students’ suspension letter)

The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Financial Aid (if applicable) appeal committees will evaluate all documentation submitted and the student's appeal will be approved or denied. The results of the appeal will be emailed/mailed by USPS within approximately ten (10) working days after the appeal is received in the Office of Academic Affairs. If denied, the student's academic and financial aid suspension is upheld, the student will be ineligible to enroll.  A student suspended for failure to meet the Financial Aid academic progress standards can enroll but is responsible for paying for their own educational costs until the student improves his/her scholastic record to meet the minimum standards for financial aid. Students who were denied due to maximum time frame are responsible for paying for their own educational costs for the remainder of their degree program. If approved, the student will either be: Placed on probation for one semester only, or placed on a continued probation based on the academic plan for success that they submitted with their appeal.

The student's approval email/letter will explain all requirements that must be met during his/her probationary period to continue as a Bacone student and to receive financial aid. A student who fails to complete a single course or has a complete withdrawal from the college after receiving financial aid may be automatically placed on suspension.


7.15. Student Satisfactory Academic Progress Responsibility

Students are held responsible for reading and understanding the Satisfactory Academic Progress eligibility requirements and knowing their status at the end of each semester. If questions arise, contact the Office of Financial Aid toll free at 888.682.5514.


7.16. Refund Policy for Financial Aid Recipients Who Withdraw or Do Not Receive Passing Grades in Any Enrolled Courses

(Return of Title IV Funds)

To officially withdraw from all courses students must go online to www.bacone.edu and complete the withdrawal process electronically.  If students have any questions with the electronic withdrawal process they are encouraged to contact Bacone College toll free at 888.682.5514 for assistance.

Students receiving federal financial assistance who completely withdraw from all classes, or fail to receive a passing grade in all courses during a period of enrollment, will be subject to the Return of Title IV Funds refund policy required by federal regulation. The Return of Title IV Funds are calculated during each period or term of enrollment. This policy applies to students receiving assistance through the PELL Grant, Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan, Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, and Direct Parent PLUS Loan programs.

This policy assumes students “earn” their financial aid based on the period of time in which they are enrolled through the semester. This policy refers to two types of withdrawals; official and unofficial. When a student officially withdraws from all courses, the Office of Financial Aid will receive notification and will determine the date of withdrawal, institutional charges, and all aid disbursed.  At the end of each semester, those students who did not receive a passing grade in any of their courses may be considered an unofficial withdrawal. These students’ withdrawal dates will be at the midpoint in the semester, the last time they attended class, or any scheduled academic event related to the period of enrollment. For those students who fail to return from an approved leave of absence, the withdrawal date will be designated as the date the leave of absence began.  After determining students’ withdrawal dates, official or unofficial, the Office of Financial Aid must then determine if the amount of aid disbursed to the student is greater than the amount the student earned. Any unearned funds must be returned to the federal student aid programs. Students who remain enrolled beyond 60 percent of the semester are considered to have earned 100 percent of aid received. Students who are enrolled for less than 60 percent of the semester will likely be responsible for repaying a portion of the financial aid received.  When performing a Return to Title IV calculation, all students’ institutional charges, i.e., tuition, fees, and room and board, are included in the calculation, as well as all disbursed federal aid. Any refund amount calculated from this formula that the College must return will be returned to the appropriate federal aid programs as determined by the Return of Title IV Funds process. Any loan funds returned as a result of the Return of Title IV Funds process will go into repayment based on the regular repayment terms of their promissory note. Students must be aware that when the College is required to return unearned funds due to their withdrawal, they may have a balance due to the school. Bacone College must complete the Return to Title IV process within 45 days of the date of a student’s withdrawal. Students will be notified by mail within approximately two (2) weeks of this completed process.


7.17. Refund Policy for Students Who Are No Shows

For students who enroll and do not attend a single class, the following “No Show” Refund Policy will be applied as follows:

Administratively withdraw the student.

Assess a "No Show" fee of $1000 for students not registered to live in the dorms, and $2000 for students registered to live in the dorms.

Full refunds would be made for tuition or tuition, room, and board; all other fees are not subject to refund.


7.18. Refund Policy for Students Due to Medical Emergencies

The “Medical Emergency” Refund Policy will be as follows:

Administratively withdraw the student.

50% refund of tuition and a prorated refund of room and board for students who cannot finish a semester due to a documented medical emergency.


7.19. Bacone College Scholarship Programs

(Completion of the FAFSA is required)

Each year many scholarships are awarded to deserving students based on merit and talent. If more than one scholarship is offered, the student will receive the highest award.  Completion of the FAFSA is required for all Bacone College scholarships.  Bacone College scholarships aid students in meeting their college tuition expenses and are not cash awards.  Bacone College scholarships cannot exceed a student’s total college expenses.  The scholarships listed below can be applied towards a student’s Tuition, Room, and Board as a main campus student enrolled full-time (minimum of 12 credit hours) in the fall and spring semesters, and must meet all other criteria established by the administration of Bacone College. Failure to comply with any of the Bacone College scholarship criteria during the course of a semester will result in the modification or forfeiture of the scholarship, including possible prorating in the current semester.

Bacone College Institutional scholarships, when added together with all other federal and state grants, or any other scholarships and grants, will not exceed the total cost of Tuition, Room, and Board. Bacone College Scholarships do not cover fees or books. Federal Work Study, Tribal Awards, and student loans can be used to cover outstanding balances, fees and/or books. All institutional scholarships will be applied with one-half of the award for participation during the fall semester and one-half of the award for participation during the spring semester.  If a student withdraws from a semester completely, or falls below full-time status, their Bacone College Scholarship will be pro-rated from the last day of full-time attendance.

Applications for scholarships will be accepted until all scholarships are allocated.  All scholarships are applicable for full-time attendance only and may be reduced according to Bacone College policy.  Unless specified, all scholarships are tuition only scholarships valid in the fall and spring terms only.  Students who receive an athletic scholarship or any institutional funding over 50% of tuition must be a residential student.

Scholarship Opportunities at Bacone College

Athletics: 

Overall Average for Athletics is $7000 / YR on Campus or $3800 / YR for off campus (GPA Requirement to maintain scholarship: 2.0)

Academic Scholarships (Incoming Freshmen Only): 

**Bacone College Scholars Society:  Merit based scholarship for first-time freshmen.  Scholarship is valid for up to four years of attendance at Bacone College and funds up to $7000.  Must meet 2 of 3 criteria for initial eligibility: 

A minimum ACT composite score of 24;

A high school GPA of at least 3.75;

High school standing within the top 10% of graduation class.

Members of the Bacone College Scholars Society are expected to participate in various leadership roles on campus such as Student Government Association, the Baconian Newspaper, Campus Ambassador’s, etc.  Students will be eligible to participate in special classes, seminars and workshops. (GPA Requirement to maintain scholarship:  3.5)

**Presidential Scholarship: Merit based scholarship for first-time freshmen.  Scholarship is valid for up to four years of attendance at Bacone College.  Must meet 2 of 3 criteria for initial eligibility:

  • A minimum ACT composite score of 23:
  •  A high school GPA of at least 3.50;
  •  High school standing within the top 15% of graduating class.
  • (GPA Requirement to maintain scholarship:  3.25)

** Bacone College Scholars Society and Presidential scholarships must be accompanied with two (2) written recommendations from a teacher, school counselor, or principal, and a two (2) page, typewritten, double-spaced essay describing your qualifications as a leader or significant achievements the student has accomplished**

Success Scholarship:

For Non-resident students.

Initial Eligibility Requires Meeting the Following Two Criteria:

  • Meet admission requirements into Bacone College; and
  • Demonstrate a financial need. Renewable Each Year Up To Four Years Based on the Following Criteria:
  • Be a student in good standing;
  • Maintain a full academic load of at least 12 credit hours per semester, and
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5.

Alexander Posey Scholarship (100 Available / 50 reserved for Creek Students)

  • Must be an enrolled member of a federally recognized tribe OR
  • Must maintain full time status
  • Must maintain a minimum GPA requirement of 2.0

Rennard Strickland School of Criminal Justice:

  • Rennard Strickland Learning Work Community- limited to 10
  • Rennard Strickland Students of Promise
  • Non-Native

Descendant Scholarship:

Eastman Richard Scholarship:

Provides a full tuition scholarship to needy and deserving students who are direct descendants of Eastman Richard.

Qualifications:

  • Awards are for tuition at Bacone College only and do not cover the costs of fees or books.
  • If there is not an eligible scholarship recipient to award the Eastman Richard Trust Scholarship to, it will not be awarded during that year.

Additional gifts may be added to the endowment at any time.

Each prospective Bacone College Student who is a candidate for the Eastman Richard Trust Scholarship, shall have their eligibility for the scholarship as a descendant of the Eastman Richard family certified by two living descendants of Eastman Richard, Esther Holloway and Bettye Snider.

Unless the prospective student is fully certified by Esther Holloway and Bettye Snider as decedents of Eastman Richard, the prospective student is not eligible to receive the scholarship.

Esther Holloway and Bettye Snider have designated their successors as certifiers of the family relationship to Eastman Richard. They are: Rebecca June Holloway and Lisa Diane Snider.

All tuition Awards will be made only to direct descendants of Eastman Richard.

Descendant Grant:

A grant for the direct blood descendants of the following contributors to Bacone College;

  • Samuel Richard
  • Walter Starr
  • William McCombs
  • Benjamin Wacoche

Qualifications include:

  • Must provide proof of their heritage (birth certificates and bloodline from tribe).
  • Must apply for Federal Financial Aid with Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Resident Students - This grant applies to Total Cost (excluding books and fees) with Federal Aid (excluding loans) and outside scholarships and grants being applied to room and board first. Any remaining cash-based funds will be applied to tuition. This grant will be used to make up the difference and can be reduced as other funds are applied.

Commuter students - This grant will cover any remaining tuition cost after Federal Aid (excluding loans) and outside scholarships and grants are applied.

If the student does not qualify for any Federal Aid except for loans, and no outside resources, the grant will cover tuition only.

Christian Ministry Scholarships

Praise Team – A mixed contemporary praise and worship ensemble that leads worship in chapel, Wednesday Night Worship, and travels to churches. Amounts of scholarships vary. (GPA requirement to maintain scholarship: 2.5)

Gospel Choir – A mixed soulful Gospel ensemble that leads worship in chapel, Wednesday Night Worship, and travels to churches. Amounts of scholarships vary. (GPA requirement to maintain scholarship: 2.5)

Worship Arts – Students who prepare visuals, run sound, and perform drama in chapel, Wednesday Night Worship, and travel to churches. Amounts of scholarships vary. (GPA requirement to maintain scholarship: 2.5)

Christian Ministry – Christian Ministry Majors who plan chapel and Wednesday Night Worship and travel to churches. (GPA requirement to maintain scholarship: 2.5)

 

[1] GI Bill is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).  More information about education benefits offered by VA is available at the official U.S. government website at http://www.benefits.va.gov/bill.

[2] GI Bill is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).  More information about education benefits offered by VA is available at the official U.S. government website at http://www.benefits.va.gov/bill.

 


8. BUSINESS OFFICE/COLLEGE EXPENSES

College Expenses

Bacone College will make every effort to contain costs from the date they are announced through the current academic year. Our Board of Trustees, however, reserves the right to make changes in tuition and fees at any time.

Students need to have a plan for meeting their college expenses before they register and begin attending classes. The beginning point for this is the Financial Aid office. Once a Financial Aid Award letter has been presented to a student, the student will know what portion of his/her account the student is responsible to pay.

8.1. Cash Paying Students

Once you have applied for and received your financial aid award package, your next question may be, "How do I take care of the costs that financial aid doesn’t cover?" The full balance after scholarships, grants, and loans is due at the start of the semester. If your family cannot pay the balance in full before the semester starts, Bacone College offers a payment plan option. Similar to the purchase of a house or a car, higher education is a long-term investment with long-term value. 

The Financial Aid office will present each student with an Estimated Charges worksheet and a separate Payment Plan if needed.  Bacone College is one of the few private colleges today who does not charge an up-front payment plan enrollment fee or interest charges on unpaid balances. 


8.2. Payment Plan

Payment Plan terms are as follows:

Semester Payment Plans

This payment plan is designed for students who enroll for only the Fall or Spring semesters separately:

Fall

Payments for enrollment costs, less verified financial aid are due as follows –

Down payment (due prior to enrollment- see schedule above)

1/3 of the balance due by September 2
1/3 of the balance due by September 30
1/3 of the balance due by October 28

Spring

Payments for enrollment costs, less verified financial aid are due as follows –

Down payment (due prior to enrollment- see schedule above)

1/3 of the balance due by February 3
1/3 of the balance due by March 10
1/3 of the balance due by April 14

Summer

Payments for enrollment costs, less verified financial aid are due as follows –

One-half of all charges not covered by financial aid must be paid by the first day of class. The remainder of charges must be paid by the first day of the fifth week of class for eight-week terms.

Students who do not complete their payment plan obligations by the final day of the semester or do not stay current with their payment plan will be administratively withdrawn unless an extended payment plan has been approved by the Bacone College Vice President of Finance.  Appeals may be made in writing to the President.



8.3. Payment of Accounts

The College reserves the right to withhold grades, academic records, transcripts, and diplomas until all financial obligations to the College are satisfied. Students whose accounts remain delinquent by the 8th week in a given semester may be administratively withdrawn.

Students that have made some payments in an academic term but are behind in their payment plans by Finals Week may be allowed to take their finals. However, until they have satisfied their balance or made sufficient progress in doing so, as determined by the Business Office, these students will receive an "AW" on their grade report and transcript for all of the courses in which they are enrolled in that academic term. Students will have until the middle of the next academic term to have their balances cleared. Upon doing so by that time, the "AW" will be replaced with the final grade the professor assigned to the course. However, students failing to have their balance cleared or at an appropriate level by the middle of the next academic term will have the "AW" become a permanent grade in all of their courses for the academic term in which they failed to meet their financial obligations.

Students that have failed to make any payments on their account balance by the middle of an academic term will be subject to immediate withdrawal.


8.4. Delinquent Accounts

When a student’s account is delinquent, no degree will be awarded (i.e. no participation in the Commencement ceremony) and no transcript of credits will be issued until settlement has been made. Students owing money from previous semesters will not be permitted to re-enroll until adequate arrangements are made through the Business Office.  Students who fail to make appropriate payment toward their payment plan may be administratively withdrawn at any time.


8.5. Charges for the 2020-2021 Academic Year

Tuition:

Main Campus:

 

     

Full-time (12-17 Credit Hours)

Fall/Spring

$6,000 Per Term

Part-time (1-11 Credit Hours)

Fall/Spring

   $400 Per Cr. Hour

Enrolled in 18+ Credit Hours

Fall/Spring

   $400 Per Cr. Hour

Tribal Colleges: (12-17 Cr. Hour)

 

 

Chartering Tribes

Fall/Spring/Summer

$250.00

Pawnee Nation

Fall/Spring/Summer

$ 174.00

 

Division of Online Teaching and Learning (DOTL) 8 week sessions:

DOTL (less than 9 Cr. Hour)

Fall/Spring/Summer

   $400 Per Cr. Hour

 

 

 

Other:

 

 

Community Audit

(1/7th of the hourly rate)

$58 Per Cr. Hour

Concurrent Enrollment for High School Students  

$400 Per Cr. Hour

 

 

General Fees:

 

 

Main Campus:

 

 

General Fee (full-time)

$1,350 Per Term

General Fee (part-time)

$550 Per Term

Tribal Colleges:

 

Pawnee, Osage

$200 Per Term

DOTL                                                           Fall or Spring Semester

$100 Per Term

 

 

 

 

Other General Fees:

 

Concurrent

$ 100 Per Term

 

Room and Board:

 

 

Private Room

 

$2,300 Per Term

Multi-Occupancy

 

$1,800 Per Term

Meal Plan - 19 Meals per week

 

$2,500 Per Term

 

 

 

Other Fees:

 

 

Fall and Spring Semesters:

 

 

Admissions Application Fee

         $0

 

International Student Deposit

$12,575

Per Student

No Show Fee (Off-Campus)

  $1,000

Per Occurrence

No Show Fee (On-Campus)

  $2,000

Per Occurrence

Processing Fee (CLEP, APP, Challenge or PEP Credits)

         $0

Per Cr. Hour

Graduation Application Fee

       $75

Non-Refundable

Official Transcript Fee – Current Students (first 5 copies)

    $0 (+5 = $5ea)

Per Copy academic yr.

Official Transcript Fee – Former Students w/ $0 balance

         $5

Per Copy

Course by Special Arrangement or Directed Study

     $825

Per Course

Book Shipping & Handling (based on actual order)

   

S&H Fee


SUMMER:

 

 

Tuition Main Campus

     $338

Per Cr. Hour

General Fee - 8 Week Main Campus

     $200

Per 8 Wk Session

 

 

 

Multi-Occupancy Room

     $580

Per 8 Wk Session

Private Room

     $770

Per 8 Wk Session

No Show Fee (Summer)

     $550

Per Occurrence

Application Fee (New Student)

         $0

Per Occurrence

Processing Fee (CLEP, APP, Challenge or PEP Credits)

         $0

Per Cr Hour

Classes by Special Arrangements or Directed Study

     $825

Per Course

 

 

 

Individual Course Charges 2020-2021

 

 

 

Course

Description

Trans Doc

Amount

ESE 3114

Exercise Physiology I

Course Fee

$25.00

ELE 4115

Mentor Teacher Charge

Course Fee

$150.00

ELE 4125

Mentor Teacher Charge

Course Fee

$150.00

ESE 3403

Prevention and Care of Injuries Charge

Course Fee

$25.00

ESE 3124

Exercise Physiology II

Course Fee

$35.00

ESE 4113

Administration of Exercise Prescription

Course Fee

$50.00

ESE 4123

Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription

Course Fee

$50.00

ESE 4996

Internship in Exercise Science

Course Fee

$35.00

MIN 4933

NCCA Conference

Course Fee

$0

MIN 2449

Internship

Course Fee

$625.00

MIN 4883

Profile and SACC Membership

Course Fee

$225.00

 

 

 

 

MIN 4893

Christian Counseling Certification II

Course Fee

$650.00

RAD 1114

Introduction to Imaging w/lab

Lab Supplies

$20.00

RAD 1223

Clinical I

Liability Insurance

$25.00

RAD 1223

Clinical I

Trajecsys Clinical Tracking System

$150.00

RAD 1223

Clinical I

Energized Lab

$40.00

RAD 1223

Clinical I

Film Badge Service

$60.00

RAD 1333

Clinical II

OSRT Convention (membership registration and hotel)

$160.00

RAD 2153

Clinical III

Liability Insurance

$25.00

RAD 2153

Clinical III

Energized Lab

$40.00

RAD 2153

Clinical III

Film Badge Service

$60.00

RAD 2203

General Registry Seminar

HESI: Exit Exams (3 exams)

$180.00

RAD 2305

Radiography Seminar

Corectec: Registry Review

$80.00

RAD 2363

Clinical V

Pinning: Pins

$70.00

RAD 2363

Clinical V

OSRT Convention (membership registration and hotel)

$160.00

RAD 2413

Career Skills

ASRT Membership

$35.00


 (*Cost subject to change based on dining service provider contract renewal for 2020-2021)

 

 


8.6. Tuition, Room & Board Refunds

A student must officially withdraw in order to receive a Tuition or Room/Board refund. To officially withdraw from all courses students must go online to www.bacone.edu and complete the withdrawal process electronically.  If students have any questions with the electronic withdrawal process they are encouraged to contact Bacone College toll free at 888.682.5514 for assistance.

If completed within the proper time frame refunds will be as shown below:

Tuition Refunds

 

Fall or Spring Semesters:

 

Withdrawal Before Classes Begin

100%

Withdrawal During the First Week of Semester

  75%

Withdrawal During Second Week of the Semester

  50 %

 

Summer Eight-Week Session:

 

Withdrawal Before Classes Begin

100%

Withdrawal During the First Week of Semester

  50%

Withdrawal During Second Week of the Semester

  25 %

Withdrawal After Second Week

No Refund

 

 

 

Room and Board Refunds

 

Fall and Spring Semesters:

 

Withdrawal Before Classes Begin

100%

Withdrawal During the First Week of Classes

  90%

Withdrawal During Second and Third Weeks of Classes

  75 %

Withdrawal During Fourth and Fifth Weeks of Classes

  50 %

Withdrawal During Sixth and Seventh Weeks of Classes

  25 %

Withdrawal After the Seventh Week of Classes

No Refund


Summer Eight-Week Session:

 

Withdrawal Before Classes Begin

100%

Withdrawal During the First Week of Classes

  50%

Withdrawal During the Second Week of Classes

  25 %

Withdrawal After Second Week of Classes

No Refund

 

 

 

Cost of Books and Supplies

The cost of books and supplies varies between programs. Students are encouraged to work with financial aid and ensure that they have budgeted wisely for the academic year.


8.7. Computer Requirement

By the end of the first semester at Bacone College, each student is required to have a computer appropriate for accessing course material, conducting research, completing assignments, and communicating with peers and instructors. As a minimum, computers need to be capable of accessing the internet (wireless), creating lengthy word processing documents, and watching class-related videos. Some degree programs such as Media Arts and Computer Information Systems may have very specific computing requirements. Students can check with advisors to verify computing needs.

A DVD/CD-ROM drive may be needed to install software in select courses. A web camera, speakers, and/or microphone may be necessary for select courses.


9. STUDENT LIFE

Student Life Offices

Bacone College believes that education occurs outside the classroom as well as inside. To encourage the extracurricular growth of its students, the college provides a well-rounded student life program. A complete guide to this program is published each year in the student handbook. Available on the web site, this handbook should be consulted for more specific information about matters discussed in this section of the catalog. A hard copy of the handbook is available upon request to Student Life.

The Student Life Offices are located at the Samuel Richard Hall. Student Life is responsible for the function of student discipline and implementation of the fair hearing process.  Also located in this area is the Student Senate office.

9.1. Housing and Hospitality

The Office of Housing and Hospitality is available to students 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. M-F. 

Bacone College currently has five residence halls available for student use: Isaac McCoy Hall, Alexander Posey Hall, and three apartment style halls. Room and Board rates are detailed in the fees section of this catalog. The housing office is located at the Palmer Center.

Students are required to have a Bacone College Student I.D. Card regardless of residency status. These cards are utilized in the Campus Dining Hall, library, and residential hall door entry.  The cards may also be utilized to obtain student discounts at various businesses throughout the city.

Residential life is one of the many ways that our students become an active part of the campus community. The residential life experience is available to those students who meet residency requirements on a space-available basis; some scholarships require full-time residency on campus for continued award.

Residency Requirements:

  • Freshmen and Sophomores shall be residential students. (Excluding DOTL students)
  • Students receiving Athletic scholarships shall be residential students.
  • Students receiving 50%+ Academic scholarships shall be residential students.
  • All International students shall be residential students.
  • Students in some program-specific scholarships.

Appeals for housing exemption should be submitted to Housing and approved by the Dean of Students. If denied, a final written appeal may be submitted to the Office of the President.

Any student who must request a replacement residential hall key may be charged the standard key replacement fee.  Residential students are required to provide proof of medical/accident coverage and verification of immunization, including the Hepatitis series, prior to assignment of a room in the residence halls.  If a vehicle is to be driven on campus, a vehicle registration form as well as proof of vehicle insurance must be provided to the Housing Office.  All vehicles must be registered regardless of residency status.

The College's policies related to vehicles and guests may be found in the latest published revision of the Student Handbook


9.2. Student Housing Refund Policies

Fall and Spring Semesters:

Withdrawal Before Classes Begin                                                      100%

Withdrawal During the First Week of Classes                                    90%

Withdrawal During Second and Third Weeks of Classes                   75 %

Withdrawal During Fourth and Fifth Weeks of Classes                     50 %

Withdrawal During Sixth and Seventh Weeks of Classes                  25 %

Withdrawal After the Seventh Week of Classes                                 No Refund

Summer Eight-Week Session:

Withdrawal Before Classes Begin                                                     100%

Withdrawal During the First Week of Classes                                   50%

Withdrawal During Second Week of Classes                                    25 %

Withdrawal After Second Week of Classes                                        No Refund

For further information, or to apply for campus housing, please contact housing@bacone.edu or:

Student Housing
Bacone College
2299 Old Bacone Road
Muskogee, OK 74403
918-360-9703


9.3. Dining Service (Meal Plans)

Bacone College Food Service offers well-planned cafeteria service meals that assure a balanced, nutritious diet. 

Commuter students may also arrange for meals. Whenever necessary, students with special dietary needs may make special arrangements with the Housing Office, located at the Palmer Center. (The Housing Office will make notification to the meal provider.) Meals are served at the dining room from the first day of classes through the last day of test week. 

The food service program serves 14 meals per week except during the Christmas holiday, Thanksgiving holiday, Spring Break week, and Easter, when the dining hall is closed. All students residing in the residence halls during Fall and Spring are required to participate in the food service program.



9.4. Food Service Refund Policies


Fall and Spring Semesters:

 

Withdrawal Before Classes Begin

100%

Withdrawal During the First Week of Classes

  90%

Withdrawal During the Second and Third Weeks of Classes

  75 %

Withdrawal During the Fourth and Fifth Week of Classes

  50%

Withdrawal During the Sixth and Seventh Week of Classes

  25%

Withdrawal After the Seventh Week of Classes

No Refund

 

 

 

Summer Eight-Week Session:

 

Withdrawal Before Classes Begin

100%

Withdrawal During the First Week of  Classes

  50%

Withdrawal During the Second Week of Classes

  25 %

Withdrawal After the Second Week of Classes

No Refund

 

 

9.5. Center for American Indians

The Center for American Indians (Center) was established in Fall 2009 as a pilot program located in the Office of the President. The Center will coordinate campus-based cultural programs, and will work in collaboration with the Division of American Indian Studies in research related to the future of American Indian education and collections in higher education.

The Center is expected to attract interest, energy, funding, faculty, staff and students and expanding American Indian Programs. These expectations will then provide for a new creative energy for this primary and historic mission of higher education with American Indians. The Center will also validate the American Indian Voice as the Privileged Voice on Bacone College's Campus. The Center is located at the Kiva.


9.6. American Indian Student Programs

Bacone College offers a variety of programs for American Indian Students.  The college is committed to the provision of scholarship and program opportunity and a variety of American Indian clubs, i.e., stickball, arts, crafts, and song and dance.


9.7. Center for Christian Ministries

The Center for Christian Ministries is located in the Bacone Memorial Chapel.  The Chaplain and the Director of Christian Ministry are available to assist students in need of counseling.  Drop by anytime during regular business hours.  Evening appointments are available upon request.

Students are encouraged to participate in planned worship experiences on the campus such as Bacone Hour and Baptist Collegiate Ministries, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and Wednesday Night Worship.  Christian outreach and mission opportunities are available through the Chaplains Office, including regular missions/service days for our students.

Christian Counseling

Christian Counseling services are provided by the Center for Christian Ministries. Two licensed pastoral counselors are available to serve students with Christian pastoral assistance.

Christian Clubs

Student Ministry at Bacone College is focused on students ministering to students. An important vehicle for student ministry is the Christian Clubs which include the Gospel Choir, Praise Team/Band, and Worship Arts Club.  These student ministries provide support and leadership for the worship and Bible study ministries of the campus.

 

 


10. ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

The Office of Academic Affairs is responsible for supporting student learning and experiences, program initiatives, and providing faculty support. 

10.1. Academic Honors

1.      Semester Honor Rolls: Outstanding students are recognized each semester through the publication of the President's and Academic Dean's Honor Rolls. In order to be eligible for the President's Honor Roll, students must earn for the semester a GPA of 3.75 or above. The Academic Dean's Honor Roll requires students to earn a semester GPA between 3.50 and 3.74. Students must complete 12 or more semester hours, with a grade no lower than a "B", in college level courses (1000 level and above) at the time of final grade reporting, to be eligible for either honor roll. High school equivalency courses do not meet the criteria for inclusion in the determination of honor awards.

 

2.    Graduation Honors:

◦   Summa Cum Laude - For students achieving a cumulative GPA of 3.90 and above.

◦   Magna Cum Laude -  Students are awarded this honor with a cumulative GPA between 3.70 and 3.89.

◦   Cum Laude - Students receive this honor with a cumulative GPA between 3.50 and 3.69.


10.2. Academic Forgiveness

A currently enrolled student may request academic forgiveness for work completed five years or more prior to the request. Forgiveness can be for ALL work, or for ALL work at a specific institution. Acceptance of any portion of previous work at a specific institution will make all work applicable. Students must apply to the Registrar for academic forgiveness upon application or re-application to the College. Academic forgiveness does not affect any financial aid policies or regulations.


10.3. Academic Classification

The number of credit hours completed according to the following determines academic classification:

Freshmen............................ 0-30 credit hours
Sophomores...................... 31-60 credit hours
Juniors............................... 61-90 credit hours
Seniors................................ 91 + credit hours

Students enrolled in first-year Health Science programs will be considered freshmen regardless of the number of credit hours earned before being admitted into the program.

No student with fewer than 61 credit hours may register for a class at the 3000 level or higher without signed approval from the appropriate instructor and Division Chair or Dean.

 

 


10.4. Semester Load and Status

A full-time student is one who carries a minimum load of 12 credit hours in the regular semester or 6 credit hours during a summer session for main campus.

A resident student is one who carries a minimum load of 12 credit hours in the regular semester or 6 credit hours during summer and is residing in Bacone College housing.

A student should carry a normal load of 12 to 17 credit hours per regular semester. In most cases, this enrollment should lead to the successful completion of all bachelor degree requirements in 8 regular semesters and all associate degree requirements in 4 regular semesters. This does not include, however, any developmental or high school equivalency course work that may be needed. It also does not include any transfer credit or college credit earned while in high school.

A student who wishes to carry more than 17 credit hours per regular semester and more than 9 credit hours during summer must have approval from the Office of Academic Affairs.

A full-time student within the Division of Online Teaching and Learning is one who carries a minimum load of 9 credit hours in the Fall and Spring semesters as well as 9 credit hours during a summer session.


10.5. Academic Progress

 (policy revised 12-22-16)

Bacone College requires that all of its students make satisfactory academic progress toward a degree in order to remain eligible as an enrolled student. Satisfactory academic progress is also necessary for students applying for and receiving assistance through the Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, Federal Work Study, Oklahoma Tuition Aid Grant (OTAG), and Oklahoma Tuition Equalization Grant (OTEG) Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP), Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan, Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Direct Parent PLUS Loan programs and VA education benefits. .  Bacone College students must meet THREE requirements to maintain their enrollment and, if applicable, financial aid eligibility:

  • Students are required to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average, and
  • Students are required to complete (pass) a certain percentage of hours they attempt, and
  • Students must complete their degree within a timely manner.

These three requirements are summarized in the following charts. Failure to meet these minimum academic standards can result in the loss of continued enrollment and financial aid eligibility. Students are expected to know, based on this Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy, when they may be placed on warning, probation, or suspension. Satisfactory academic progress is reviewed at the end of each academic semester once grades have been posted.

1) Grade Point Average Requirement - Each student must meet a minimum cumulative grade point average to remain eligible for continued enrollment and federal student aid.

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy Requirements

Undergraduate Students

Total Hours Attempted from all Institutions

1-30 Credit Hours

31-60 Credit Hours

61 or more Credit Hours

Minimum Cumulative GPA Requirements

1.60 GPA

1.80 GPA

2.0 GPA

 

2) Satisfactory Completion of Semester Hours Requirement - Students must also successfully complete and pass 67% of all courses they attempt. Grades of A, B, C, D, F, P, S, W, AW, WP, WF, I, N, NA, NP, X, and U are all considered attempted hours. All transfer hours are included in this calculation.

 

Percentage of cumulative attempted hours a student must complete to remain eligible for Federal Student Aid

 Undergraduate Students

Students must successfully complete:

67% of all attempted hours

 

3) Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion - Students must complete their degree program within an allotted time frame to remain eligible for financial aid. The chart below indicates the time frame in which a degree must be acquired. Be aware that hour limits are cumulative; therefore, all hours from all institutions attended will be included, even if a student did not receive federal student aid. For financial aid purposes grades of A, B, C, D, F, P, S, W, AW, WP, WF, I, N, NA, NP, X, and U are all considered attempted hours. Once students reach their maximum time frame for their specified degree, they are no longer eligible for federal student aid.

 

 Attempted Hours Allowed for Earning a Degree

186 HOURS - First Bachelor's Degree

 

Repeated Coursework - Title IV funds may only pay for one repeat of a previously passed course. More than one repeated course will not be calculated in your enrollment status pertaining to Title IV funds.


10.6. Satisfactory Academic Progress Evaluation

Satisfactory Academic Progress is evaluated at the conclusion of each academic semester after grades have been posted. All attempted and transfer hours are counted during this evaluation.

·         Warning is given to students for one semester who do not meet either requirement #1 or #2 shown above. This is a warning status and students can continue enrollment and receive financial aid during their next semester of attendance. Note: A warning is not given to students regarding maximum time frame, it is the student's responsibility to know how many hours they have attempted and where they stand.


10.7. Appeal of Suspension

A student with extenuating circumstances may appeal a suspension by submitting a typed appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs AND the Office of Financial Aid (if applicable). Appeals must explain in detail why the student failed to meet the minimum academic standards, what extenuating circumstances caused the failure, and how the situation has since improved. Examples of extenuating circumstances include illness, medical issues with immediate family members, or a death in the family. Personal or financial issues with family, friends, or roommates are not considered extenuating circumstances. A student's typed appeal should include:

·      The reason(s) why the student failed to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress.

·      Supporting documentation that may be pertinent to the student's appeal.

·      An academic plan for success. (Details will be outlined in students’ suspension letter)

The Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Financial Aid (if applicable) appeal committees will evaluate all documentation submitted and the student's appeal will be approved or denied. The results of the appeal will be emailed/mailed by USPS within approximately ten (10) working days after the appeal is received in the Office of Academic Affairs. If denied, the student's academic and financial aid suspension is upheld, the student will be ineligible to enroll.  A student suspended for failure to meet the Financial Aid academic progress standards can enroll but is responsible for paying for their own educational costs until the student improves his/her scholastic record to meet the minimum standards for financial aid. Students who were denied due to maximum time frame are responsible for paying for their own educational costs for the remainder of their degree program. If approved, the student will either be: Placed on probation for one semester only, or placed on a continued probation based on the academic plan for success that they submitted with their appeal.

The student's approval email/letter will explain all requirements that must be met during his/her probationary period to continue as a Bacone student and to receive financial aid. A student who fails to complete a single course or has a complete withdrawal from the college after receiving financial aid may be automatically placed on suspension.


10.8. Student (SAP) Responsibility

Students are held responsible for reading and understanding the Satisfactory Academic Progress eligibility requirements and knowing their status at the end of each semester. If questions arise, contact the Office of Financial Aid toll free at 888.682.5514.


10.9. Refund Policy for Financial Aid Recipients Who Withdraw or Do Not Receive Passing Grades in Any Enrolled Courses (Return of Title IV Funds)

To officially withdraw from all courses students must go online to www.bacone.edu and complete the withdrawal process electronically. If students have any questions with the electronic withdrawal process they are encouraged to contact Bacone College toll free at 888.682.5514 for assistance.

Students receiving federal financial assistance who completely withdraw from all classes, or fail to receive a passing grade in all courses during a period of enrollment, will be subject to the Return of Title IV Funds refund policy required by federal regulation. The Return of Title IV Funds are calculated during each period or term of enrollment. This policy applies to students receiving assistance through the PELL Grant, Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan, Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, and Direct Parent PLUS Loan programs.

This policy assumes students “earn” their financial aid based on the period of time in which they are enrolled through the semester. This policy refers to two types of withdrawals; official and unofficial. When a student officially withdraws from all courses, the Office of Financial Aid will receive notification and will determine the date of withdrawal, institutional charges, and all aid disbursed. At the end of each semester, those students who did not receive a passing grade in any of their courses may be considered an unofficial withdrawal. These students’ withdrawal dates will be at the midpoint in the semester, the last time they attended class, or any scheduled academic event related to the period of enrollment. For those students who fail to return from an approved leave of absence, the withdrawal date will be designated as the date the leave of absence began.

After determining students’ withdrawal dates, official or unofficial, the Office of Financial Aid must then determine if the amount of aid disbursed to the student is greater than the amount the student earned. Any unearned funds must be returned to the federal student aid programs. Students who remain enrolled beyond 60 percent of the semester are considered to have earned 100 percent of aid received. Students who are enrolled for less than 60 percent of the semester will likely be responsible for repaying a portion of the financial aid received.  When performing a Return to Title IV calculation, all students’ institutional charges, i.e., tuition, fees, and room and board, are included in the calculation, as well as all disbursed federal aid. Any refund amount calculated from this formula that the College must return will be returned to the appropriate federal aid programs as determined by the Return of Title IV Funds process. Any loan funds returned as a result of the Return of Title IV Funds process will go into repayment based on the regular repayment terms of their promissory note. Students must be aware that when the College is required to return unearned funds due to their withdrawal, they may have a balance due to the school. Bacone College must complete the Return to Title IV process within 45 days of the date of a student’s withdrawal. Students will be notified by mail within approximately two (2) weeks of this completed process.


10.10. Academic Dishonesty Policy

The fundamental principle of academic life is integrity. The Bacone College community does not condone academic dishonesty in any form. When an act of academic dishonesty has occurred the incident must be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs by the faculty member in whose class(es) the act(s) of academic dishonesty occurred. Following the reporting of the incident(s) the subsequent actions may be taken:

  1. The instructor has the right to not accept the assignment or test in question and record a "zero" for the assignment or test, and/or require the student to redo the assignment (or test), or require the student to complete a substitute assignment or test.
  2. The student may be dropped from the class and assigned a failing grade (F). A written recommendation from the instructor is required.
  3. In cases of extreme or repeated incidents (two or more) of academic dishonesty, the student may be suspended from Bacone College.

The instructor and/or the Office of Academic Affairs will notify the student as to the action taken. If the student believes there has been an erroneous accusation made, the student may appeal the action. The student must file a written appeal within 10 working days of notification. The Office of Academic Affairs hears the appeal in the presence of the student, the instructor and the division chair as deemed necessary. The student and faculty member are informed in writing of the action taken.


10.11. Advanced Credit

The student, through several available options, may earn a total of 15 college credit hours toward the associate degree and 30 hours toward the bachelor degree.

Through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and Advanced Placement Program (APP), a student may test out of a subject and receive college credit.

Students may earn the credit hours shown by proving competency in the following CLEP subject matter tests (no credit will be allowed for general examination by CLEP). Credit will be given for these same subjects with a grade of 3 on the APP.

Subject

Minimum Score

Bacone Course

Credit*

American Literature

50

LIT 2773

One 3 hr. elective

English Literature

50

LIT 2543

One 3 hr. elective

English Comp I

50

ENG 1113

3

Humanities

50

AES

3

Principles of Economics

50

ECN 2113

3

Calculus

50

MTH 2135

5

Natural Science

50

 

4

* Credits are what Bacone College will allow towards a major or general education requirement. If a student CLEPs out of any course where there are no credits specifically reflected above, the student will receive the ACE recommended number of credit hours to apply to elective hours - - the credits will not fulfill general education requirements.

College credit may also be earned through distance learning courses offered through approved colleges and universities. The Division Chair, the Registrar, and the Office of Academic Affairs must approve for transfer of credit from distance learning courses offered by other institutions.

Students may obtain up to 21 credit hours of general education advanced standing credits via transfer credits, CLEP testing and AP exams.


10.12. Audit Courses

Student Audit

Students who wish to participate in a class without earning credits toward a degree may audit the class. Grades or grade points for these courses will not be issued. Students must pay the full tuition rate for courses taken by audit. Students may change enrollment status from audit to credit, or credit to audit, until the close of the late enrollment period. Audited courses do not apply toward meeting graduation requirements. 

Community Audit

Community members are encouraged to participate in auditing a program at Bacone College.  There is no tuition; however, there is a fee that is one-seventh (1/7th) of the hourly established rate. Any applicable fees for materials as outlined in the Financial Section of the catalog also apply.  Full-time students have priority for enrollment in all classes; therefore, community participants cannot enroll in any audited class until after the last day to enroll.  Consequently, the date a community participant can enroll is two weeks after the first day of class in the fall and spring semesters.

10.13. Student Advising

Once a new main campus student completes the Admissions and Financial Aid processes, Admissions evaluates the student’s academic documents, such as standardized test scores or transcripts from other colleges, to determine a student’s correct placement in their classes.

The Registrar determines if a course taken elsewhere is equivalent to one required for a major at Bacone College.  A grade of “D” is not transferable toward any Bacone College requirements.


10.14. Introduction to the Majors at Bacone College

Each major offered by Bacone College has designated a specific course, or courses, which will satisfy the Introduction to the Major requirement of the First 30. For the specific introduction to the major course, please visit with your advisor.


10.15. Attendance and Responsibility for Learning

Bacone College expects students to attend class on a regular and punctual basis. Students who are absent from class, regardless of the cause, have the responsibility of communicating with the instructor to discuss the missed work. The instructor will determine whether the student will be permitted to submit the work and will decide on the time and nature of the make-up assignment. Students who do not appear at the time prearranged for the make-up assignment forfeit any right to make-up the work. Excessive class absences do have a negative impact upon a student’s participation in a class and could result in a final grade of “F” for a course.

  

Campus Attendance Policy

1.     All students will be advised of the campus absence policy at orientation and in first year seminar.   All faculty members will include the policy in their syllabi

2.     All communication with students will be by Bacone email only and students are required to use only that for class communication or Moodle.  Students will be trained in the use of Bacone email in classes, orientation, and other means for the first two weeks.  These instructions will be repeated constantly.

3.     Student athletes who are departing for travel in the afternoon are required to attend morning classes.  Athletes will provide their instructors with their schedules as the season opens and notify their instructors of travel in advance.

4.     Students who are absent due to illness will need to prove their illness with a doctor’s form

5.     Instructors will have the discretion to award extra credit as appropriate to their syllabus

6.     Attendance will be taken from the first day of class attendance.

 

Intervention Practices

1.     When a student has accumulated 2 unexcused absences, the Attendance Intervention Team will act:

2.     The faculty member who is aware of the absences will email the Intervention Team which will consist of: the  student’s faculty advisor, the Director of TRIO,  Ms. Kaila Harjo (VP of Student Affairs),  and the student’s coach (if an athlete) advising them of the absences.  The following steps will be taken

a.     The faculty advisor will have a personal conference with the student advising them of the impact on their academic performance within one week,

b.     The VP Student Life will have a conference with the student, advising them of the possible impact on their Bacone scholarship and financial aid within one week

c.     If an athlete, the Coach will be notified and will handle the absences according to the athletic agreement signed by all athletes

d.     The Director of TRIO or designee will meet with the student to offer tutoring and other services.

e.     Each of these will send an email to the other members of the Intervention Team as they conduct their interviews with the student

3.     Upon the 4th Unexcused Absence, the instructor may advise the student that their grade will be reduced one letter grade due to excessive unexcused attendance

4.     Upon the 6th Unexcused Absence, the instructor may advise the student they are being withdrawn from the class and the instructor will ask the VPAA to have the student Administratively Withdrawn (showing a grade of “AW” in the student record.)

5.     Faculty will be accorded the right to exercise discretion based on knowledge of the student.

6.     Students have an opportunity for appeal of grades or absences.  Appeals of grades are made to the Division Chair in accordance with policies in the college catalog.  Appeals of absences are made in writing to the VPAA in accordance with policies in the college catalog.


10.16. Courses Repeated and Final Grades

Students may repeat a course in which they have made a grade of D or F.  They may repeat a course a maximum of four (4) times.  When repeating a course, the last grade earned is the grade that will be used in computing the hours attempted, hours for credit, and for cumulative grade point determination.  All entries remain a part of the student’s permanent transcript.

Final grades, other than incompletes, may be changed by faculty or college action only when there has been an error in computing the grade.


10.17. Adding and/or Dropping Classes

Students need to be familiar with the current Academic Year Calendar for the dates associated with adding a class to their official schedule and have until the last business day of the tenth week to officially drop a class. The dates to add and/or drop courses during the summer sessions, or for courses that meet at special times, may vary. Students must check the current, official Academic Calendar or inquire in the Office of the Registrar to find out the allowed dates for adding or dropping classes in those sessions or for classes that meet at special times, including accelerated programs.

To add or drop a class, students are required to meet with their advisor to review their options, then acquire the signatures necessary. The completed form (with signatures) must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar during normal business hours.

Prior to add/drop no record of courses that are dropped is needed since the period is during active enrollment.  After add/drop any dropped course must be reported as a W, and the hours listed as attempted on the transcript.

A student may be withdrawn from class(es) by the Office of Academic Affairs in cases where the student displays disrespectful or disruptive behaviors.

10.18. Credit Hour

A semester hour of credit is given for the equivalent of one 50-minute class period per week for a semester of 17 weeks. In the case of laboratory work, one semester hour of credit is granted for each two or more hours of laboratory work. With the exception of accelerated classes, the length of classes during summer and evening sessions will be proportioned according to the clock hours of a course meeting during the regular day classes.

Internship experiences for credit hours required the student to be registered and enrolled for the semester in which the internship is earned. Students must work 40 hours for each one hour of credit. For example, to earn three credits for the internship, 120 work hours must be completed over the course of the semester. A six-credit internship requires 240 work hours.


10.19. Disclosure Policy

Bacone College retains directory data and confidential data about current and former students. Upon admission, students provide and entrust the college with data for academic and personal records and other data generated during the student’s enrollment. As custodian of these records, Bacone College acknowledges the student's right of privacy concerning this information. The college further recognizes that certain information is a matter of public record and may be released for legitimate purposes. Bacone College strictly follows and adheres to the guidelines and stipulations stated in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (as amended). For more information regarding these guidelines, contact the Office of the Registrar or the Office of Academic Affairs. Or you may log onto the following website for a detailed description of FERPA:

            http://www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html

10.20. Final Examinations

The week set aside for final examinations is published each semester in the College’s official Academic Calendar. A detailed schedule of final exams is distributed to faculty and posted for students during each semester.  Examinations are to be given only at the scheduled time and each class must meet at that time. Only the Office of Academic Affairs can approve requests for early examinations or excuses from examinations. In emergency situations, a student may petition to take an incomplete in the course.


10.21. Skill Assessments

For all first-time freshmen and students transferring from other institutions with less than 30 credit hours, ACT sub-scores are used to determine where students need to be placed in mathematics, reading, and writing course work.


10.22. Grade Reporting

Each instructor reports to the Registrar mid-term deficiency progress grades of those students who are performing unsatisfactorily at the end of the sixth week of classes in the fall and spring semesters. Mid-term deficiency progress grade reports are not reported in summer term. Students may print a final grade report using the CAMS Student Portal following the end of each semester or summer term.


10.23. Academic Appeals

Relationships between students and educators at Bacone College are based on the assumption of mutual acceptance of certain rights and responsibilities. Disputes involving academic performance (grades) can often be resolved through an appeal process. An Academic Affairs Committee will be appointed to review an appeal only after an attempt has been made by the involved persons to resolve their differences within the following framework:

·      Student conferences with the instructor.

·      If necessary, student conferences with his or her faculty advisor.

·      If necessary, student conferences with the appropriate Division Chair.

·      If necessary, the Division Chair conducts a conference with all parties present.

When appealing a final grade received in a course, students must file an appeal before the end of the eighth week of the fall or spring semester following the semester, session or term in which the grade was recorded.

Information on appeal procedures is available in the Office of Academic Affairs. After an Academic Committee has issued an opinion on an appeal, the plaintiff or defendant can appeal the decision to the Office of Academic Affairs. An appeal must be submitted in writing to the Office of Academic Affairs within ten days after the decision of the Academic Committee.


10.24. Grading System

Final grades are reported for each student for every course undertaken according to the following grading system:

A

4.0 Grade Point

Excellent

B

3.0 Grade Point

Good

C

2.0 Grade Point

Average

D

1.0 Grade Point

Below Average

F

0.0 Grade Point

Failure

I

Incomplete

When, in the instructor’s judgment, justifiable circumstances exist, the instructor may issue an “I” grade.

W

Withdraw

No grade points awarded. A “W” grade is assigned to a student’s record as an understanding that a student has withdrawn from a class.

U

Unsatisfactory

Failure to successfully complete a credit or non-credit course.

CR

Credit

Credit allowed for proficiency/testing, e.g., CLEP, ACT-PEP, APP.  Credit hours are included in hours earned, but not used in computation of grade point average.

AU

Audit

An “AU” indicates that no credit was earned, and is not used in the computation of a grade point average.

AW

Administrative Withdrawal

The student has been “involuntarily” withdrawn by the institution during the designated semester for disciplinary or financial reasons.  An Administrative Withdrawal requires approval by the Office of Academic Affairs.  An “AW” grade is not used in the computation of a grade point average.

LA

Leave of Absence Status

The student has voluntarily withdrawn due to personal, professional, or military reasons. LOAS application must be signed by the Associate Dean of Faculty (Office of Academic Affairs). The Vice President of Finance will approve the disposition of student’s financial obligations at time of application.

NS

No Show

No Show grade applied when student receives no show status during a semester.  NS is not used in the computation of a grade point average.


10.25. Incompletes

Incomplete is defined as when a student has done satisfactory work in a course but has failed to complete a portion of the course requirements because of documented, extenuating circumstances. The instructor submits the request (via MOODLE: Fac Res Site: Incomplete Grade Request) for approval to the Office of Academic Affairs specifying the class assignments and exams yet to be completed. The time period to complete the coursework will not exceed beyond mid-term of the following semester. For students in accelerated programs, the time period to complete the coursework may not exceed beyond six months from the date the incomplete was approved.  At the end of the contracted period the instructor must submit a change of grade request for the "I" with the final grade to be awarded (via MOODLE: Fac Res Site: Grade Change Request) to the Office of Academic Affairs. If the instructor has not requested a change to the "I" grade within the specified time period, or the student does not complete the assignments as stipulated, the "I" grade will be changed to the grade submitted by the instructor on the original request. The "I" grade is not used in the computation of a student’s grade point average.


10.26. Withdrawal

When a student finds it necessary to withdraw from all classes, he or she must officially withdraw from the College or the academic record will reflect the grade assigned by the instructor according to the instructor's grading policy for that class. The withdrawal process begins by completing the official online withdrawal request at www.bacone.edu. During the fall and spring semesters, students have until the end of the last business day of the tenth week to withdraw from a class and not have a grade reported for the course. After the tenth week, no withdrawals are possible and the student will receive a grade for the course. Summer sessions and courses meeting at special times and have withdrawal dates that vary. Students must check the current, official Academic Calendar or with the Office of the Registrar to find out the allowed dates of withdrawal for those sessions. Once a student has officially registered, in order to receive a 100% refund a withdrawal form must be completed prior to the first day of class.


10.27. Course by Special Arrangement

Under certain circumstances, students may petition for an “arranged” section of a required course that is unavailable to them at its regularly scheduled time. The decision to authorize such an arranged class is made by the student’s advisor, the applicable division chair/dean, the Registrar, and the Office of Academic Affairs, respectively. Factors taken into consideration include the degree of conflict, convenience, previous opportunities to take the course, semesters remaining in which the course might be taken, and whether or not a substitution or waiver of the required course might be possible.  An additional fee will be required when the course is solely for the convenience of the student and not due to some error on the part of the College.


10.28. Directed Study

In consultation with an advisor or sponsor, students are invited to propose directed study in subject areas not included in the catalog or in the regular curriculum. This opportunity is available as an accommodation to students where special need, strong interest, and a lack of appropriate alternatives exist. Approval of directed study is by the student’s advisor, the applicable division chair/dean, the Registrar, and the Office of Academic Affairs.  An additional fee will be required.


10.29. Policy Regarding the Appropriate Use of Technology in the Classroom

Bacone College recognizes the growing importance and impact technology is having upon teaching and learning in higher education. As a result, the College supports the appropriate use of the latest technology by students and professors. However, the College is equally aware of the potential, serious distractions to learning that can occur by the thoughtless and insensitive use of technology in a classroom setting. To promote the most effective classroom learning environment possible, the following identify the appropriate use of technology in Bacone College’s classrooms.

  • The faculty member(s) of record for each course has the right and responsibility to determine the appropriate use of technology by students in the classroom(s) where course sessions are held.
  • Cell phones must be switched to off, silent ring, or vibrate and put away.
  • PDA's, IPOD's, and other similar technological devices must be turned off and put away.
  • Laptops may be used in the course at the discretion of the instructor or professor. Students are not allowed to access non-class related websites, instant messaging, or software programs at any time during the class session.
  • Recordings of class sessions shall be used only for the student's private study and information from those recordings will not be made available to other persons not enrolled in the course.
  • Faculty may dismiss from any particular class session, a student violating any of the above requirements or uses another technological device not listed above in a way that is distracting to the professor and/or members of the class.

10.30. Transfer of College Credits

Bacone College reserves the right to determine for itself college course credits from other institutions that are acceptable to be transferred in to meet graduation requirements. Courses will not be accepted in transfer and applied to student degree programs until the College has made such determination and the student's advisor, the applicable division chair/dean, and the Registrar have granted PRIOR approval. Transfer credits will only be applied to the permanent record of a student currently enrolled at the College. Transcripts received for a student who does not have a current enrollment will be filed until such time as the student officially enrolls for classes at Bacone College. Bacone College allows credits transferred from another institution to apply towards one of its degree programs where a minimum grade of "C" has been earned in the course(s) taken at another institution.  All coursework taken at any previous college(s) will be applied to the permanent academic record of the student according to the grading policies and procedures of Bacone College (see under Academic Forgiveness in the Academic Information section regarding the policy to request removal of any previous coursework).

Current students who want to take a course at another college should complete a Request for Transfer of College Credit form prior to that time to be sure that course will be accepted in transfer (refer to the Academic Information section regarding the minimum number of hours required for associate degrees and bachelor degrees). This form may be obtained from the website www.Bacone.edu or the Registrar's Office.


10.31. Transfer of College Credit Policy for Non-Regionally Accredited Institutions

The Higher Learning Commission states, in their Commission Policy and Good Practices on Transfer of Credit, under The Role and Responsibilities of Institutions, that colleges and universities are ultimately responsible for decisions about the admission of transfer students and the acceptance or non-acceptance of credits earned elsewhere.  Typically, academic faculty and student affairs professionals (working within the framework of faculty rules and standards) determine the transferability of courses and programs.  Institutions must balance responsiveness to students’ preferences about transfer with institutional commitment to the value and quality of degrees or other credentials.

In light of this statement from the HLC, the following procedure will be followed in determining how transfer of credits will, or will not be applied from an institution of higher learning that is not regionally accredited based upon the previously noted HLC Practices on Transfer of Credit.

Step 1 – Registrar will contact surrounding area colleges who are regionally accredited to see if they have accepted credits from the college in question.

Step 2 – The student will be notified that Bacone College will need a syllabus for every course the students wants to have accepted in transfer.

Step 3 – A copy of the course syllabus received will be sent to the respective Division Chair/Dean for consideration.  The Division Chair/Dean may determine that a specific faculty member in their department with expertise in the area of the course should review the syllabus.  Once a review of the syllabus has been conducted, acceptance/denial will be noted and sent to the Registrar.

Step 4 – The Registrar will keep a paper trail of any syllabi sent to Division Chairs/Deans.  Once a determination has been received from the Division Chair/Dean, the Registrar will notify the student by written communication.

Transfer of Elective Credit – Bacone College will not accept elective credit from an unaccredited institution unless it is a recognized course that it offers.

10.32. Transcripts

Transcripts may be requested by one of the following:

  1. By personally stopping by the Office of the Registrar, located in Palmer Center on the campus of Bacone College;
  2. By emailing a scanned, signed request to Registrar@bacone.edu.
  3. By mailing a request to the Office of the Registrar, Bacone College, 2299 Old Bacone Road, Muskogee, OK 74403; or
  4. By faxing a request to the following number: 1-866-498-1487.
  5. By visiting www.bacone.edu and applying for a transcript request.

All requests for transcripts must include the following information:

a. Name

b. Name on Transcript

c. Social Security or Student I.D. Number

d. Approximate dates of attendance

e. The signature of the person whose transcript is requested, authorizing release of the transcript

f. Payment of a transcript fee (current student – first five (5) transcripts free within the calendar year; thereafter, $5.00 per transcript. Former student - $5.00 per copy) – check, money order, or Visa/Master Charge accepted. For transcript inquiries call 918-781-7401.

Bacone College reserves the right to withhold official and unofficial transcripts until satisfactory arrangements have been made for payment in full of an outstanding student account in the Business Office.  Please allow two business days for processing a request for transcript.


10.33. Continuing Education

Continuing education is designed to meet the ongoing educational and occupational needs of east central Oklahoma area residents. Linking the community and the college, continuing education operates on the premise that learning is a life-long process. Focusing on a wide range of educational categories, Continuing Education courses aim toward fulfilling the needs of students of every age, economic status, and educational level.

Continuing education is provided for all segments of the community for credit or non-credit. Short courses, workshops, seminars, and special offerings benefit students professionally, culturally, socially, and vocationally. Contact the Center for Christian Ministry for more information.


10.34. Summer Term

The Summer Term consists of one eight-week session. Students may take no more than nine credit hours unless they obtain permission from the Academic Vice President to take more.


10.35. Merritt D. Betts Library

The mission of the Merritt D. Betts Library System is to support scholarship and education by providing outstanding and innovative information services and resources to the students, faculty, and the research community.

The Library provides access to materials in print and increasingly in electronic formats, including Westlaw, Medline and other Internet-based resources. Databases are accessible 24/7 – with appropriate credentials.


10.36. Bacone College Archives and Special Collections

The Bacone College Archives and Special Collections are housed in Betts Library which is the administrative division that oversees the library’s rare, fragile, archival, or other holdings needing special care. Our goal is to make these materials accessible to researchers while preserving the items for posterity. This is a non-circulating part of Betts Library and is accessible by appointment only. 

The collection ranges from American Indian literature to scholarly monographs including government documents detailing ethnographic studies and historical records of American Indian tribes.  In addition, the holdings include some manuscript collections, notably the journals and diaries of Joseph Murrow, a prominent American Baptist missionary who resided in the Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory in the latter nineteenth century. 

Betts Library houses existing materials and seeks to acquire manuscripts, photographs, older published materials, and contemporary scholarly monographs in American Indian history and cultures, with special attention to history of tribes in Indian Territory.  The library accepts as donations published materials appropriate to research on American Indian history and culture.  In addition, published or manuscript materials related to the history of Bacone College, especially collections of papers from Alumni who have achieved significant prominence in American history are desired for the collection.  Oral history materials (recordings and/or transcriptions, preferably the latter) are sought from all the aforementioned and from individuals associated with Bacone College who can reflect on the past history of the institution.  In accordance with Bacone College's donation policy, all donations are required to be approved by the Development Office and by the Executive Director of Betts Library prior to acceptance.

 


10.37. Student Support Services/Trio

Student Support Services is a program to offer students additional services in order to assure they have the support they need to stay in college and, ultimately, graduate.  To reach those goals, SSS/TRiO offers a variety of services in designed to assist students in meeting their academic, personal, career and social goals. You may visit their Center for Academic Success for additional academic advising, academics assistance, such as coaching or tutoring, and help in completing the financial aid process. Other services are cultural enrichment trips, professional and peer mentoring, guidance in applying to graduate school and workshops on important topics, like personal financial management, time/task management, test taking skills, and writing skills. 

SSS/TRiO is 100% funded by the United States Department of Education.  According to the grant and the Department of Education, the goals of the program are to improve the retention and graduation rates of students.  To qualify, one must (1) be an American citizen, (2) have an academic need, and (3) meet one of the following criteria: a) first-generation college student (parents do not  have a 4-year (bachelor’s) degree);  b) financially under-resourced, and/or c) documented physical or mental disability.  Applications and more information are available in Palmer Center 204 or by calling 918-781-7254.


10.38. Statement on Learning and Physical Disabilities

Bacone College accepts students with learning and physical disabilities and provides reasonable accommodation to help them be successful. Depending on the nature of the disability, some students may need to take a lighter course load and may need more than four years to graduate. Disability accommodations in higher education are approached differently than in grades K-12, and colleges and universities are not obligated to provide the same accommodations provided by a previous school. For details from Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 regarding Documentation Guidelines, Burden of Proof, Individualized Accommodations, and Guidelines, See Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Students needing accommodation should apply as early as possible, usually before the semester they plan to attend classes. Students need to identify and document the nature of their disability which usually consists of results from testing done by a psychologist, psychiatrist, medical doctor and/or other qualified licensed individuals. It is the responsibility of the student to provide the College with the appropriate materials documenting the learning and/or physical disability. The documentation needs to include a recommendation for accommodations from the qualified licensed individual. The College does not provide assessment services for students who may be learning disabled nor does the College have structured programs available for students with emotional or behavioral disabilities. For information regarding learning or physical disability accommodations please contact the Office of Academic Affairs.

 

 


11. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS LIST

Division of American Indian Studies

·         Associate of Arts in American Indian Studies

·         Bachelor of Arts in American Indian Studies

 

Division of Professional Studies

·         Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science

·         Associate of Applied Science in Radiography

·         Bachelor of Science in Family Studies Education

·         Associate of Science in Child Development

·         Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development and Education

·         Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education

 

School of Business and Finance

·         Associate of Science in Business Administration

·         Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Concentrations in Accounting, General Business, Management, Marketing, Tribal Leadership)

·         Bachelor of Science in Recreation Management

·         Bachelor of Science in Sport Management

 

Division of Liberal Arts

·         Associate of Arts in Art

·         Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts

·         Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry – (Concentrations in Christian Counseling, American Indian Ministry)

·         Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts (Concentrations in English, History, Communications, Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies)

 

Rennard Strickland School of Tribal Law and Criminal Justice

·         Associate of Science in Criminal Justice

·         Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

 

Division of Online Teaching and Learning

·         Associate of Science in Child Development

·         Associate of Science in Business Administration

·         Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Concentrations in Accounting, General Business, Business Administration, General Business, Management, Marketing, Tribal Leadership)

·         Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry

 


12. CORE CURRICULUM, LEARNING GOALS AND OUTCOMES

The “Bacone College Core” are those courses that the College requires all students to take to demonstrate knowledge in the classic fields of human thought in the sciences and humanities. The philosophy underlying the Bacone College Core is to help students become:

 

  • Spiritually self-aware, self-directed, life-long learners.
  •  Informed, responsible, resourceful citizens and community leaders in local and global contexts.
  •  Ethical and moral decision-makers.
  • Critical thinkers with effective communication skills.
  • Individuals with an awareness of cultural diversity and social heritage.
  • Individuals appreciative of aesthetic expressions.
  •  Learners who are skilled in mathematical reasoning and scientific inquiry.

 

The value and efficacy of the Bacone College Core will be demonstrated by graduating students who:

 

  • Have participated in community service projects in various course settings.
  •  Have participated in campus and community cultural and civic events.
  • Can communicate effectively in verbal and in written prose.
  • Have achieved a passing grade in all courses in the core curriculum.
  • Can critically evaluate information and its sources.
  • Have achieved an understanding of aesthetic beauty by engaging in a mode of artistic expression.
  • Have experienced spiritual growth by learning more about the Christian faith.
  • Have experienced moral growth by living according to a Christian code of ethics.

 

The Bacone College Core is designed according to specific curricular themes consistent with a liberal arts education:

 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Programs

The Spiritual Self

  • Spiritual Life -- 3 hours
  • Body and Mind -- 2 hours

The Social

  • History -- 3 hours
  • The American Indian Experience -- 3 hours

The Aesthetic

  • The Nature of Creativity -- 3 hours

The Scientific

  • The Natural Sciences -- 4 hours
  • Mathematics -- 3 hours

Cognitive and Critical Thinking

  • First Year Seminar /Introduction to Major (one course according to major) -- 3 hours
  • First Year Seminar (Majors/Undecided)
  • English Composition I -- 3 hours
  • English Composition II -- 3 hours
  • Critical Thinking and Speaking -- 3 hours
  • Religion—3 hours
  • Logic -- 3 hours

Total Bacone College Core hours: 36

Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Programs

The Spiritual Self

Spiritual Life -- 3 hours

  • The Social
  • The American Indian Experience -- 3 hours

The Scientific

  • The Natural Sciences -- 4 hours
  • Mathematics -- 3 hours

Cognitive and Critical Thinking

  • First Year Seminar (Majors/Undecided)
  • English Composition I -- 3 hours
  • English Composition II -- 3 hours
  • Critical Thinking and Speaking -- 3 hours

Total Bacone College Core hours: 25

Liberal Arts Guided Electives

As part of its goal to provide students with a rich exposure to the liberal arts, Bacone College requires students pursuing a bachelor's degree to choose 9 credit hours from selected courses in the following liberal arts disciplines:

 

  • Political Science, Psychology, and/or Sociology -- 3 hours
  • Literature (LIT or COM1113 or ENG 3000+) -- 3 hours
  • Art  -- 3 hours

 

Students pursuing the Associate of Arts or the Associate of Science degree are required to choose 6 credit hours from the allowed courses in the following liberal arts disciplines:

 

  • Political Science, Psychology, and/or Sociology -- 3 hours
  • Literature (LIT or COM1113 or ENG 3000+) -- 3 hours
  • Art -- 3 hours

 

All students should consult with their advisor to make sure they choose courses that meet the Liberal Arts Guided Electives (LAGE) requirement.  LAGE credit hours are in addition to the credit hours required in satisfying the core curriculum for the bachelors or associates degrees. 

Requirements for Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Degrees

  • Successful completion of a minimum of 60 semester hours of college work and a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is required for graduation. The last 15 of the final 30 hours applied toward the degree must be satisfactorily completed at Bacone College.
  • Degrees are conferred at the end of the fall, spring, and summer semesters with one commencement ceremony for all graduates in May of each year. Consult individual degree plans for any additional requirements that may be necessary including CGPA . Candidates must file applications for degrees prior to the semester they expect to graduate. At that time, the Office of the Registrar will conduct a final degree check. No degree will be awarded and no participation in the Commencement ceremony will be allowed if a balance is owed.
  • Students completing all graduation requirements during the fall semester will participate in graduation exercises the following spring semester. Students who lack nine (9) credit hours toward graduation by the end of the spring semester may participate in the spring graduation exercises. However, all requirements for the degree must be met by the end of the summer term before the degree will be conferred.  The requirements for the degree must be completed within one year from the date of the student’s application for graduation to guarantee that the student may graduate under the catalog/degree plan of the student’s year of entrance at Bacone College. In order to meet the U. S. Department of Education guidelines, the term in which the requirements for a degree are completed will be the date of degree completion listed on the student transcript.
  • In the event an applicant for an associate degree already has a bachelor degree or higher, only those classes applied to the associate degree will be accepted and transferred to the Bacone College academic record.

Requirements for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Degrees

  • A minimum of 124 credit hours is required for the bachelor degree.
  • The last 30 of the final 60 hours applied toward the degree must be satisfactorily completed at Bacone College.
  • Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.0 as a minimum for graduation. Consult individual degree plans for any additional requirements that may be necessary including CGPA.
  • Degrees are conferred at the end of the fall, spring, and summers semesters with one commencement ceremony for all graduates in May of each year. Candidates must file applications for degrees prior to the semester they expect to graduate. At that time, the Office of the Registrar will conduct a final degree check. No degree will be awarded and no participation in the Commencement ceremony will be allowed if a balance is owed. Up to 30 credit hours may be earned through evaluation of competency in subject matter by using the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Advanced Placement Program (APP), ACT-PEP, or distance learning courses. Students completing all graduation requirements during the fall semester will participate in graduation exercises the following spring semester. Students who  lack nine (9) credit hours toward graduation by the end of the spring semester may participate in the spring graduation exercises. However, all requirements for the degree must be met by the end of the summer term before the degree will be conferred.  The requirements for the degree must be completed within one year from the date of the student’s application for graduation to guarantee that the student may graduate under the catalog/degree plan of the student’s year of entrance at Bacone College. In order to meet the U. S. Department of Education guidelines, the term in which the requirements for a degree are completed will be the date of degree completion listed on the student transcript.
  • In the event an applicant for the bachelor degree already has a bachelor degree or higher, only those classes applied to the specific degree will be accepted and transferred to the Bacone College academic record.

 

 

13. NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS UNDER FERPA FOR POSTSECONDARY INSTITUTIONS

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights are:

  • The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access.  Students should submit to the registrar, dean, or head of the academic department [or appropriate official] written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  • The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes is inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the College official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the College decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
  • The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit and health staff); a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
  • Upon request, the College discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. [NOTE: FERPA requires an institution to make a reasonable attempt to notify the student of the records request unless the institution states in its annual notification that it intends to forward records on request.]
  • The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: 

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
Washington, DC 20202-4605


14. TRUSTEES, ADMINISTRATION, AND FACULTY

Board of Trustees

Joe Bunch, Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Joseph Garcia, Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico

Matthew Komalty, Carnegie, Oklahoma

Dwight Pickering, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Quinton Roman Nose  (Chair), Watonga, Oklahoma

John Shotton, Red Rock, Oklahoma

Lahoma Schultz (Secretary/Treasurer), Enid, Oklahoma

Geoffrey Standing Bear, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Neely Tsoodle, Anadarko, Oklahoma

Reggie Wassana, Concho, Oklahoma

W. Richard West, Jr.(Vice Chair), Los Angeles, California

Trustee Emeriti

Kenneth Adams, Newport News, Virginia

Stephen Adkins, Charles City, Virginia

Ann Barker-Ong, Muskogee, Oklahoma

Elizabeth Higgins, Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Peggy Parsons, Muskogee, Oklahoma

Administration

Dr. Ferlin Clark, President

Dr. Beverly Smith,  VP of Academic Affairs

Dr. Nicole Been, VP of Strategic Initiatives and Special Projects        

Kaila Harjo, VP of Student Affairs

Will Lowe, Director of Human Resources

Mike Gonzales, Athletic Director

Aaron Adson, Director of Center for American Indians

Wendy Burton, Public Relations Coordinator

Faculty

Abraham, Jyoti - Associate Professor of Biology

Conine, Jeff – Associate Professor of English

Cournoyer, Gerald – Assistant Professor of Art, Director of Art Program

Dixon, Shawn – Assistant Professor Health Sciences, Program Director Radiography Program

Michael, Nicky Kay—Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies

Moore, Ted--Chair, American Indian Studies; Art Instructor

Ren, Ran – Assistant Professor Business

Sharp, Donna – Assistant Professor General Education, Education

Smith, Beverly—Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies and Director of Retention and Assessment

Strange, Linda – Professor of Mathematics

Trammel, Joanna – Assistant Professor Business

Truelove, Rebecca – Assistant Professor Education

Wiley, Stephen – Assistant Professor Ministry, Director Center for Christian Ministry

Win, Wambli Sina – Associate Professor Criminal Justice

Winters, John – Associate Professor Business

Administrative Staff

Joshua Chapman, Interim Director of Financial Aid

Linda Milam, Registrar

Gail Shaffer, Assistant Registrar

David McMillan, Librarian

Chris Ehlers ,  Director of Information Technology

Patricia Farrell, Director of Student Support Services

Administrator Emeriti

Marlene Smith, Ed.D,Academic Vice President, Emeritus

Lewis Woodson, MS,Vice President of Finance, Emeritus In Memoriam July 8, 1931 – June 30, 2019

Professor Emeriti

Linia Harman MT, Professor Emeritus, Math/Science n Memoriam August 3, 1921 – July 25, 2013

Ruthe Blalock Jones, Professor Emeritus, Art

Wendella Thomason, MT, Professor Emeritus, Home Economics and Developmental Studies In Memoriam September 27, 1928 – April 10, 2012

Billie Tower, MS, Professor Emeritus, Nursing

Walter Richard West, Sr.,MFA, Professor Emeritus, Art In Memoriam September 8, 1912 – May 3, 1996

John Williams, MA, Professor Emeritus, Social Science

 



15. DEGREE DESCRIPTIONS, COURSE SEQUENCES AND PLANS

Requirements for Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Degrees

Successful completion of a minimum of 60 semester hours of college work and a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is required for graduation. The last 15 of the final 30 hours applied toward the degree must be satisfactorily completed at Bacone College.

  • Degrees are conferred at the end of the fall, spring, and summer semesters with one commencement ceremony for all graduates in May of each year. Consult individual degree plans for any additional requirements that may be necessary including CGPA . Candidates must file applications for degrees prior to the semester they expect to graduate. At that time, the Office of the Registrar will conduct a final degree check. No degree will be awarded and no participation in the Commencement ceremony will be allowed if a balance is owed.
  • Students completing all graduation requirements during the fall semester will participate in graduation exercises the following spring semester. Students who lack nine (9) credit hours toward graduation by the end of the spring semester may participate in the spring graduation exercises. However, all requirements for the degree must be met by the end of the summer term before the degree will be conferred.  The requirements for the degree must be completed within one year from the date of the student’s application for graduation to guarantee that the student may graduate under the catalog/degree plan of the student’s year of entrance at Bacone College. In order to meet the U. S. Department of Education guidelines, the term in which the requirements for a degree are completed will be the date of degree completion listed on the student transcript.

In the event an applicant for an associate degree already has a bachelor degree or higher, only those classes applied to the associate degree will be accepted and transferred to the Bacone College academic record.

Requirements for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Degrees

·      A minimum of 124 credit hours is required for the bachelor degree.

·      The last 30 of the final 60 hours applied toward the degree must be satisfactorily completed at Bacone College.

·      Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.0 as a minimum for graduation. Consult individual degree plans for any additional requirements that may be necessary including CGPA.

·      Degrees are conferred at the end of the fall, spring, and summers semesters with one commencement ceremony for all graduates in May of each year. Candidates must file applications for degrees prior to the semester they expect to graduate. At that time, the Office of the Registrar will conduct a final degree check. No degree will be awarded and no participation in the Commencement ceremony will be allowed if a balance is owed.

·      Up to 30 credit hours may be earned through evaluation of competency in subject matter by using the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Advanced Placement Program (APP), ACT-PEP, or distance learning courses.

·      Students completing all graduation requirements during the fall semester will participate in graduation exercises the following spring semester. Students who  lack nine (9) credit hours toward graduation by the end of the spring semester may participate in the spring graduation exercises. However, all requirements for the degree must be met by the end of the summer term before the degree will be conferred.  The requirements for the degree must be completed within one year from the date of the student’s application for graduation to guarantee that the student may graduate under the catalog/degree plan of the student’s year of entrance at Bacone College. In order to meet the U. S. Department of Education guidelines, the term in which the requirements for a degree are completed will be the date of degree completion listed on the student transcript.

·      In the event an applicant for the bachelor degree already has a bachelor degree or higher, only those classes applied to the specific degree will be accepted and transferred to the Bacone College academic record.

PLEASE SEE DEGREE DESCRIPTIONS, COURSE SEQUENCES AND PLANS IN CHAPTERS BELOW.

 


16. DIVISION OF AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES

Bacone College provides teaching of historical and contemporary Native perspectives of culture and life. The Division of American Indian Studies offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Associate of Arts degree in American Indian Studies.  The Bachelor's degree offers a core liberal arts curriculum built around courses in American Indian history, culture and literature.  Those courses build basic skills in critical and analytic reading, writing, and speaking.  The curriculum also promotes students' career interests by offering a series of courses dealing with contemporary issues in American Indian communities—health, education, leadership, governance, environment, and arts.  Students will also be required to complete an off campus internship that complements coursework.  The specialized courses and internship are intended to prepare students with a career plan that they can pursue after graduation. 

The Division of American Indian Studies and the Center for American Indians support culturally appropriate academic and cultural enrichment programs for American Indian students.  The degree programs, however, are open to all students at Bacone College.  The activities sponsored by the Center for American Indian provide academic enrichment, social and cultural support for all American Indian students, both those who choose majors in American Indian Studies or in other academic programs at Bacone.


16.1. Associate of Arts in American Indian Studies Degree Programs

The Associate of Arts in American Indian Studies is a two-year program that comprises a core of liberal arts oriented courses from a variety disciplinary areas—Indian Art, American Indian Literature, American Indian History, and American Indian Tribal Government.  Bacone College also offers a variety of other courses dealing with American Indian topics such as Media Studies and Special Studies in American Indian Studies courses which change from year to year, but are noted in the Class Schedule.  The Associate of Arts Degree program promotes students' acquisition of basic skills in critical and analytic reading, writing, and speaking. It is intended to prepare students to transfer to upper division programs leading to the Bachelor's degree. 


Admission Requirements

Graduation from an accredited high school (or its equivalent) with a satisfactory scholastic record; Minimum - ACT composite score of 18 or a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in a minimum of twenty (20) college credits applying toward the AA in AIS degree. Introduction to American Indian Studies should have been completed with a grade of "C" or better within the five (5) years prior to admission to fulfill degree requirements.

*Any course under the American Indian Studies rubric in a given semester may fulfill the AIS Emphasis requirements.


Course Sequencing

First Year Fall Semester      

AIS 1103         Introduction to American Indian Studies      

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

________3      General Elective/AIS Emphasis        

15 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

AIS 2023         American Indian Mythology

ENG 1213       English Composition II

SPC 1713        Speaking & Thinking Critically

REL 1003        Introduction to Christianity

_______2        General Elective/AIS Emphasis (2 CR HR)

_______3        General Elective/AIS Emphasis

17 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

______ 4         Science Course w/Lab (4 CR HR)    

AIS___3          AIS Elective

AIS 2003         American Indian Government           

_______3        General Elective/AIS Emphasis        

_______3        Liberal Arts Guided Elective                         

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

AIS___3          AIS Elective

AIS 2333         American Indian Literature

AIS 2913         Contemporary American Indian Affairs

_______2        General Elective/AIS Emphasis (2 CR HR)

_______3        General Elective/AIS Emphasis

_______3        Liberal Arts Guided Elective

17 Credit Hours

65 Total Hours for Associate of Arts in American Indian Studies


65 Total Hours for Associate of Arts in American Indian Studies


 


16.2. Bachelor of Arts in American Indian Studies Degree Programs


 

Bachelor of Arts in American Indian Studies

Course Sequencing

 

First Year Fall Semester      

AIS 1103         Introduction to American Indian Studies      

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

REL 1003        Introduction to Christianity   

15 Credit Hours         

 

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213       English Composition II

SPC 1713        Speaking & Thinking Critically

AIS 1213         Survey of American Indian Arts and Crafts

AIS 2003         American Indian Government

_______3        General Elective/AIS Emphasis

15 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

_______4        Science Course w/Lab           

AES 2003       Creativity: Treasuring the Arts          

AIS 2513         American Indian Philosophy and Religion   

AIS 2333         American Indian Literature   

_______3        General Elective                    

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

ESE 2112        Personal Health

_______3        LIT or COM Course

_______3        AIS /ART 1123-2133 or 2213-2223

_______3        General Elective

AIS 3123         American Indian Health Management and Services or

AIS 3133         Tribal Economic Development/Tribal Management

17 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester    

AIS 3013         American Indian History I (or HIS 3013)     

LOGIC 3213  Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic          

_______3        General Elective        

_______3        General Elective        

_______3        AIS Emphasis Elective (or AIS 3123/3133)              

15 Credit Hours         

 

Third Year Spring Semester

AIS 2003         American Indian Government

AIS 3023         American Indian History II

AIS 2401         American Indian Song and Dance

_______3        General Elective

_______3        General Elective

_______3        AIS Major (choose one) AIS 3113, 3003, 4003

16 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester  

AIS 4009         American Indian Internship   

_______3        General Elective        

_______3        General Elective                    

15 Credit Hours         

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

AIS 4203         Senior Seminar

_______3        General Elective

_______3        General Elective

_______3        General Elective

_______3        General Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Arts in American Indian Studies


16.3. Bachelor of Arts in American Indian Studies Emphasis in Tribal Languages


Course Sequencing

First Year Fall Semester

AIS 1103        Introduction to American Indian Studies

_______3        LAGE – LIT 2333/COM1113/PSC/SOC Core

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar

ENG 1113       English Composition I

SPC 1713        Speaking and Thinking Critically

15 Credit Hours

 

First Year Spring Semester

______3          LAGE – American Indian LIT/Philosophy/History/Religion

______4          4 Credit hour Science course with Lab

ENG 1213      English Composition II

MTH 1513      College Algebra

_______3        REL 1003/1013/2253 Religion Course

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester

CIS 2113         Information in Modern Society

ESE 2112        Personal Health

LOGIC 3213  Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

______3          Elective

______3          Elective

14 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Spring Semester

AIS 1159        Internship – Tribal Language I (12 CR HRS)

12 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester

AIS 2159        Internship – Tribal Language II (12 CR HRS)

_______3        General Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Summer Semester

AIS 2733        Curriculum Development for Tribal Languages

AIS 2743        Teaching Methods for Tribal Languages

AIS 2723        Applied Linguistics for Tribal Languages

9 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Spring Semester

AIS 3159        Internship Tribal Language III (12 CR HR)

______ 3         General Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester

AIS 4159        Internship Tribal Language IV (12 CR HR)

12 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

AIS 4203        Senior Capstone

_______3        General Elective (3 CR HR)

_______3        General Elective (3 CR HR)

_______3        General Elective (3 CR HR)

_______3        General Elective (3 CR HR)

_______1        General Elective (1 CR HR)

16 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit Hours for Bachelor of Arts in American Indian Studies – Tribal Languages

 

The AA and BA degrees in American Indian Studies can be completed in their entirety at the Bacone College Main Campus.


17. DIVISION OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

The Bacone College Division of Professional Studies seeks to train students to become highly qualified health services practitioners, Exercise Science professionals, educators, researchers, scientists, and graduate students within a diverse, empowering environment.

The mission of the Division of Professional Studies is to assist in meeting the demands for highly competent health care providers, Exercise Science specialists, and others who are educated at the Baccalaureate degree level to provide skilled, informed, and caring expertise, with respect for individual, cultural, and spiritual differences. The Division of Professional Studies maintains Bacone College’s commitment to serve American Indians and other ethnic groups in a culturally diverse, Christian environment while focusing on overall wellness and quality of life.


17.1. Associate of Applied Science in Radiography

Mission Statement:

The mission of Bacone College Radiography Program is to assist in meeting community needs for highly competent radiographers, who give skilled care with respect for individual, cultural, and spiritual differences, while maintaining the college commitment to serving American Indians. This is accomplished through didactic education, and clinical education provided at affiliated hospitals and clinics. The combination of theory and clinical practice enables the student to acquire the knowledge, skills, and professional values necessary for the practice of radiography in diverse community and clinical settings.

Program Goals/Student Learning Outcomes:

The program goals/student learning outcomes of Bacone College, Associate of Applied Science Degree in Radiography, can be located in the Radiography Student Handbook, Bacone College Website, or Trajecsys (clinical tracking system).

Program Overview:

Radiography is an exciting and dynamic field of medical imaging. Radiographers use radiation generating machines and associated equipment to produce images of internal body structure/organs. These images contain vital information needed by the physician for proper patient diagnosis.

Bacone radiography students receive classroom instruction at the Muskogee location and clinical experience at affiliated hospitals and clinics. Upon successful completion of the program, the student will receive an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Radiography and is eligible to take the national certification examination administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Radiographers may be employed in a hospital/clinical settings, private physician office, or mobile diagnostic environments.

*Students who graduate after December 31, 2014 will be required to have a minimum of an associate’s degree in order to be eligible to apply and take the ARRT national certification exam.

 

Didactic Faculty

 

Shawn Dixon, M.Ed., RT(R)ARRT

Program Director & Instructor

Crystal Campbell, MSHA, RT(R)(ARRT)

Clinical Coordinator & Instructor

 

Accreditation (On Probation)

Bacone College Radiography Program is Accredited by the:

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)
20 North Wacker Drive. Suite 2850
Chicago, IL 60606-3182
www.jrcert.org
Tel: (312) 704-5300; Fax: (312) 704-5304

 

PROGRAM CURRICULUM/COURSE SEQUENCE

 

The Radiography Program is a 19-month (five-semester) consecutive program consisting of 53 credit

hours of Radiography courses (didactic and clinical) and 19 credit hours of related general education

courses, with a total credit hours of 72. Upon completion of the program, graduates receive an

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in Radiography, and are eligible to apply for the examination by

the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).The sequencing are as follows:

 

           FIRST YEAR

Fall (August-December) Semester                                   Credit Hours                       Day

RAD1224   Imaging II w/ Lab                                                                          4                                        M

RAD1224L Imaging II Lab                                                                               0                                        W

RAD1223   Clinical I                                                                                         3                                       TR

RAD1123   Patient Care & Education                                                               3                                        F

MTH1513  College Algebra                                                                              3= 13 credit hours        

 

Spring (January-May) Semester                                  Credit Hours                     Day                                 

RAD1403   Radiation Protection                                                                       3                                        M

RAD2223   Imaging III w/ Lab                                                                         3                                        M

RAD2223L Imaging III Lab                                                                              0                                        W

RAD1333   Clinical II (fluoro & surgery rotations)                                          3                                        TR                

RAD2213   Image Evaluation & Acquisition                                                    3                                        W

SPC1713    Speaking & Thinking Critically                                                     3= 15 credit hours

 

Summer (June-August) Semester                                  Credit Hours                     Day

RAD2113   Radiation Physics                                                                            3                                       MT

RAD2153   Clinical III (4 wk evening rotations)                                               3= 6 credit hours            WR

 

            SECOND YEAR

Fall (August-December) Semester                                 Credit Hours                     Day

RAD2254   Clinical IV (CT rotation)                                                                 4                                       TRF                   

RAD2305   Radiography Seminar                                                                      5                                       M                                 

AIS1103     Introduction to American Indian Studies                                         3

RAD2313  Digital Imaging                                                                                 3= 15 credit hours             

 

Spring (January-May) Semester                                    Credit Hours                    Day

RAD2363   Clinical V (specialty rotation)                                                         3                                       TRF

RAD2413   Career Skills                                                                                    3                                        M

RAD2203   General Registry Seminar                                                               3                                        W

REL1003    Introduction to Christianity                                                             3= 12 credit hours             

                     

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS WITH PREREQUISITES= 58

 

*Prerequisites for the program  BIO2134, RAD1103, RAD1114, ENG1213                                                                                                

**Minimum grade for prerequisites and RAD prefix courses is a “C”

***Must have a complete admission file, orientations completed, and grade of “C” or better in RAD1114 to be considered

      for the Fall start date.

Rev.4/21/20


 


17.2. Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science

The Exercise Science program is committed to serving all qualified students in a culturally diverse population through introducing the skills to improve fitness and wellness in the community.

With the expansion of professions in sports, fitness and activity related to health care, Exercise Science is widely recognized as a degree program that can be used as a foundational Bachelor’s degree for acquiring health profession certifications and degrees. Graduating with a degree in Exercise Science opens the door to a broad range of opportunities for careers including personal training and/or strength and conditioning, athletic training, exercise testing technician for cardiac rehabilitation patients, wellness program director, exercise-based research, coaching and other health care-related field vocations

Exercise Science

The Exercise Science program is committed to serving all qualified students in a culturally diverse population through introducing the skills to improve fitness and wellness in the community. Exercise Science is now being widely recognized as a degree program that can be used as a foundational bachelor's degree for acquiring health profession certifications and degrees. Someone graduating with a degree in Exercise Science, and possibly pursuing other post-graduate certification, would have a broad range of career choices including but not limited to: fitness / strength training, athletic training, physical therapy, medicine and other healthcare-related field careers.  Students are prepared to sit for the ACSM Certified Personal Trainer Certification and the NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist Certification.

 


Admission Requirements

Each of the following requirements must be fulfilled prior to program admission:


·      Completion of two semesters of study with 24 or more hours toward graduation (developmental courses do not count).

·      The student has successfully completed (C or better): 1) ENG 1113 English Composition I, 2) ENG 1213 English Composition II, 3) BIO 1114 Human Biology, 4)  MTH 1513 College Algebra, and 5) CHM 1364 or BIO 2134.

 

Entrance Requirements for Exercise Science

The Exercise Science Program requires students meet the following threshold criteria for program admission: completion of two semesters of study with 24 or more hours toward graduation, completion of two of three science courses with a "C" or better (BIO 1114, BIO 2134, and/or CHM 1364), and a 2.25 composite GPA.  After successful completion of these criteria, students will be transferred into the ESE program in which the program coordinator will serve as their advisor.

 

Graduation Requirements

Exercise Science

A minimum of 124 credit hours and 2.25 GPA are required to graduate. All ‘Degree Requirement’ courses, ‘Program Electives’ courses, as well as ENG 1113, ENG 1213, BIO 1513, MTH 1513, and CHM 1363 or BIO 2134 must have a grade of C or better.

                                                                                                       

 Bacone College

Division of Professional Studies

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science

Recommended Course Sequence

 

Freshman – Fall

 

4   BIO 1114 Human Biology

3   ENG 1113 English Composition I

3   MTH 1513 College Algebra

3  AIS  American Indian Studies

3   CLE 1103 Freshman Seminar 

16

 

Freshman – Spring

 

3   ENG 1213 English Composition II

4   CHM 1364 Chemistry

3   LIT or COM 1113 Guided Elective Course

3   SPC 1713 Speaking and Thinking Critically

 3    REL Religion                                             

16

Sophomore – Fall

 

3  RAD 1003 Medical Terminology

3  ESE 2103  Foundations of Ex Science

2  ESE 2112 Personal Health

3  PSY or SOC Guided Elective Course

3  BIO 2123 Nutrition

3  HIS History

17

 

Sophomore – Spring

 

3   ESE 3303 Wellness & Fitness

4   BIO 2134 Anatomy & Physio I

3   SME 4113 Sports Law

 2   ESE 3102 Consumer, Env & Community Health

1   HPE Sport Elective

3   SME 4303 Psy of Human Behavior in Sports

16

Junior – Fall

 

4   ESE 3114 Exercise Physiology I

4   BIO 2134 Anatomy and Physiology II

3   LOGIC 3213

3  RME 2313 Sociology of Sports& Recreation

2  PED 2002 Educational Technology

16

 

Junior – Spring

 

4        BIO 2324 Microbiology

4     ESE 3124 Physiology II

3     ESE 3403 Care & Prevention of Injuries

3     AES Aesthetics & Social Sciences

1     HPE Sport Elective

15

Senior – Fall

 

3  ESE 3513 Kinesiology 

3  ESE 3603 Strength & Conditioning Pre.

3  ESE 4113 Sports Law

3  ESE 3703 Personal Train. Certificate Prep. 

3  ART  Art Elective

15

Senior – Spring

 

3   ESE 4213 Fitness Assessment & Ex. Prescription

3   RME 3403 Org. & Adm. Of Sports Management

 3   ESE Capstone Project ( ESE seniors only)

 4   ESE 4994 Internship  (ESE seniors only)

13

 


  **A minimum of 124 credit hours and 2.25 GPA are required to graduate. All ‘Degree Requirement’ courses as well as ENG 1113, ENG 1213, BIO 1513, and MTH 1513, must have a grade of C or better.**

__________

(2.21.2019)

 

 

 

 


17.3. Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Inactive Program)

This program is currently inactive. Currently, the college has no faculty for this program and classes are not being offered. And no students are being recruited for this program at this time.

Program Mission Statement

The program mission is to serve American Indians in a Christian environment to assist in

meeting the community need for professionally competent, registered nurses who plan

and provide skilled care with respect for personal, cultural, and spiritual differences.

 

Goals and Outcomes

 

·      Students will be clinically competent.

            Student Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate proper head-to-toe and 

            physical assessments.

            Students will demonstrate satisfactory nursing skills and techniques as a 

            provider of individual or group client care.

            Students will demonstrate proper patient safety skills.

·      Students will demonstrate communication skills.

            Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to communicate verbally

            with others in classroom and clinic settings.

            Students will be able to produce written communication skills.

            Students will be able to demonstrate the use of information technology in patient care and information management for nursing care.   

·      Students will model professionalism.

           Student Learning Outcomes: Students will gain professional development knowledge outside the classroom.

            Students will develop job placement skills.

            Students will demonstrate legal, ethical, and professional behavior as a care provider.

·      Students will develop critical thinking skills.

            Student Learning Outcomes: Students will learn to continuously collect and record data that will be comprehensive, systemic, and accurate.

            Students will use critical thinking in applying research findings in planning nursing care.

           Students will demonstrate clinical reasoning in areas of healthcare trends.

·      Students will feel that the program is effective.

             Student Learning Outcomes: Students will complete the program.

             Students will be satisfied with the education they received prior to graduation.

             Graduates will pass the NCLEX exam on first attempt.

             Graduates will be employed within six months.

             Employer satisfaction of recent graduates.

             Graduates will remain employed in nursing in three years.

             Assessment:

·       Students will integrate concepts of liberal education to guide nursing practice.

·       Students will incorporate knowledge and skills in leadership, quality improvement, and patient safety to provide high quality health care.

·       Students will integrate evidence, clinical reasoning, and inter-professional collaboration in patient centered care.

·       Students will utilize patient care technologies and information management to support decision making in the provision of quality patient care.

·       Students will demonstrate clinical reasoning to guide professional nursing practice reflecting: health care trends, ethical principles, economic influences, legal parameters, and political factors.

·       Students will implement various communication strategies to guide practice decisions and improve patient outcomes.

·       Students will develop strategies to promote healthy lifestyles and disease prevention for individuals/target population.

·       Students will demonstrate professionalism in the contribution for the advancement of nursing.

·       Students will utilize strategies which promote holistic patient centered nursing care for culturally, ethnically, and spiritually diverse patients across the health-illness continuum, throughout the lifespan, and in all settings.

 

Indicators of Success

 

  • 75% of candidates will successfully complete the program with a minimum 2.50 GPA.
  • 75% of graduates will pass the NCLEX exam on first attempt.
  • 50% of graduates will be employed in underserved areas within three years.
  • 30% of graduates will have an advancement in position within three years of graduation.
  • 25% of graduates will continue higher education or certification within three years of graduation.
  • 30% of graduates will be employed in non-traditional roles within three years.
  • 100% of graduates will be actively engaged in self-directed learning to maintain state-of-the-art nursing practice within one year.
  • 20% of graduates will be members of a professional organization.
  • 75% of graduates will remain employed in nursing for three years.

 

Employer surveys will evaluate graduates after one year.

 Admission Criteria: Students accepted directly from high school must meet following criteria: ACT composite 21 or higher, cumulative 2.5 GPA, and passed four years of high school math, science, and English.

Transfer students or students not meeting any of the above criteria must have minimum cumulative GPA 2.5 and passed prerequisites with the grade of a “C”.

Foreign students: must have passed the TOEFL or IELTS tests if English is not the primary or native language.

Prerequisites are stated on the degree plan.

 

BSN PROGRAM CURRICULUM/COURSE SEQUENCE

 

           FIRST YEAR

Fall Semester                                                                                                     Credit Hours                   

ENG 1113 English Composition I                                                                             3                                       

BIO 1114  Human Biology                                                                                        4

BIO  1114L Human Biology Lab                                                                              0                                       

MTH 1513 College Algebra                                                                                      3

AIS 1003 American Indian Studies                                                                           3                                       

ART 1003 Art Fundamentals                                                                                     3= 16 credit hours        

 

 

 

Spring Semester                                                                                                   Credit Hours                                

ENG 1213 English Composition II                                                                              3

CHM 1364 Chemistry                                                                                                  4

CHM 1364L Chemistry Lab                                                                                        0

BIO 2134 Anatomy & Physiology I                                                                            4

BIO 2134L Anatomy & Physiology I Lab                                                                   0 

LIT 1113 Introduction to Literature                                                                             3

RAD 1103 Medical Terminology                                                                                 3= 17 credit hours

           

SECOND YEAR

Fall Semester                                                                                                        Credit Hours                   

BIO 2324 Anatomy & Physiology II                                                                            4

BIO 2324L Anatomy & Physiology II Lab                                                                   0

NUR 1113 Fundamentals of Nursing                                                                            3 

LANG Native American Language                                                                               3

SPC 1713 Speaking & Thinking Critically                                                                   3

HIST 2113 US History                                                                                                  3= 16 credit hours 

 

Spring Semester                                                                                                  Credit Hours                 

REL 1003 Religion                                                                                                        3

BIO 2324 Microbiology                                                                                                4

BIO 2324L Microbiology Lab                                                                                      0

NUR 1112 Nursing Skills & Techniques                                                                      2

NUR 1102 Pharmacology/Dosage Calculations                                                           2

LOGIC 3213 Intro to Critical Thinking                                                                        3= 14 credit hours

           

THIRD YEAR 

 Fall Semester                                                                                                      Credit Hours                 

NUR 1224 Medical/Surgical Nursing                                                                           4

NUR 1222 Medical/Surgical Nursing Clinical                                                              2

NUR 2023 Nursing Care of Children                                                                            3

NUR 2021 Nursing Care of Children Clinical                                                              1

NUR 2033 Nursing Care of Family                                                                              3

NUR 2021 Nursing Care of Family Clinical                                                                 1= 14 credit hours

         

Spring Semester                                                                                                   Credit Hours                  

NUR 2042 Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Care                                                     2

NUR 2041 Psychiatric-Mental Health Care-Clinical                                                     1

NUR 2144 Advanced Medical-Surg Nursing Care                                                        4       

NUR 2142 Advanced Medical-Surg Nursing- Clinical                                                  2

NUR 2243 Nursing Strategies for Progressive Leadership                                            3

NUR 2242 Nursing Strategies for Progressive Leadership Capstone                            2

PSC 2023 Developmental Psychology                                                                           3= 17 credit hours

FOURTH YEAR

  Fall Semester                                                                                                    Credit Hours                 

NUR 3003 Health Care Community & Nursing Informatics                                       3

NUR 3103 Theories & Concepts in Professional Nursing                                           3

NUR 3183 Transcultural Nursing & Health Care                                                         3

NUR 3243 Health Assessment & Promotion                                                                3

BIO 2123 Nutrition                                                                                                       3 = 15 credit hours

 Spring Semester                                                                                                 Credit Hours                 

NUR 3303 Nursing                                                                                                        3

NUR 4173 Nursing Research                                                                                         3

NUR 4385 Community Health Nursing                                                                         5

NUR 4484 Leadership and Management Practice   in Health Care Organizations        4= 15 credit hours

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS WITH PREREQUISITES= 124


18. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND FINANCE

Mission Statement

 

The School of Business and Finance provides a student-centered learning environment to develop the business skills and appreciation for continuous learning necessary to succeed in a dynamic global economy. The faculty is empowered to help develop ethical, knowledgeable, and technologically competent business professionals. We strive to do this to further the College’s mission of providing a premier educational experience through Christian principles while providing equal educational opportunity to all.

To best serve our students and to efficiently use institutional resources, the School of Business and Finance will seek to:

 

1.     Offer a responsive, flexible business curriculum within a learning environment that prepares and supports analytical thinking and lifelong learning.

2.     Integrate technology into our teaching and communications with students and colleges.

3.     Create an environment to fulfill our mission by providing opportunities for faculty development; support for faculty efforts to serve students and improve our programs; and appropriate rewards for achievements in teaching, intellectual contributions, and service.

4.     Target well-defined markets and promote the School of Business and Finance effectively in those markets.

5.     Build and maintain partnerships with key constituencies.

 

In order for a student to apply for admittance into the School of Business and Finance at the BSBA  level, he/she must have earned a minimum of 60 credit hours; have a current GPA of 2.50 or higher on a 4.00 scale; and grades earned in the following required courses must be a “C” or higher:  English Comp I, English Comp II, College Algebra, Principles of Management, Principles of Marketing, Business Law I, Financial Accounting, and Managerial Accounting, Business Finance, Buyer Behavior, and either ECN or any 3000 level department course.

 


18.1. Associate of Science in Business Administration


Recommended Course Sequence for Associate of Science in Business Administration

 

First Year Fall Semester      

CLE 1003       First Year Seminar     

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

ACC 2113       Financial Accounting 

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

AIS ____3       American Indian Studies       

15 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

ACC 2123       Managerial Accounting

BUS 2143       Business Law I

ENG 1213       English Composition II

REL____3      Religion Course

________4      Science w/Lab (4 CR HR)

16 Credit Hours

 

First Year Summer Semester

______3          Intro to Psychology or Sociology

______3          General Elective

6 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

CIS 3213         Technology Applications in Business

MKT 2283      Principles of Marketing         

MGT 2223      Principles of Management     

SPC 1713        Speaking and Thinking Critically      

______3          General Elective        

______3          ART Course   

18 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

MGT ___3      Any 3000 level Management Course

MKT 2513      Buyer Behavior

FIN 3113         Business Finance

ECN 2513       Microeconomics

LIT ___3         Literature Course

15 Credit Hours

 

66 Total Credit Hours for Associate of Science in Business Administration

 


18.2. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Degree Programs

Required Total General Education is 45 credit hours. For more detail go to Bacone College Core Curriculum for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Degree.

 

Required Courses in Business Administration Core - 46 credit hours

 

The major in Business Administration has a core of 46 credit hours taken by all students majoring in this business program. Besides the core, students choose from one of six different emphasis areas. These areas of emphasis are accounting, general business, management, marketing and tribal leadership. Students must maintain a 2.50 cumulative GPA to earn a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the School of Business and Finance.  Furthermore, the student must also earn a 'C' or higher in all Business core class and major related course work.

 

18.3. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Accounting

The objective of this program is to prepare students to commence and to continue to develop in a wide range of professional accounting careers. Upon completion, students will have the basic conceptual knowledge of business and sufficient depth and breadth in accounting that will prepare for careers as professional accountants in financial institutions, industry, private practice and in the non-profit sector.

 

Successful completion of the program requires students to meet the Bacone College’s general education requirements, the School of Business and Finance’s core requirements and the required course of study for the focus on accounting. All courses taken to satisfy the accounting focus require a grade of ‘C’.

        

 

First Year Spring Semester

ACC 2123       Managerial Accounting

HIS ____3       History Course

ENG 1213       English Composition II

MKT 2283      Principles of Marketing

________3      Guided Elective

HPE ____1     HPE Course (1CR HR)

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

BUS 2143       Business Law I          

ACC 2203       Intermediate Accounting I     

ECN 2113       Microeconomics        

SPC 1713        Speaking & Thinking Critically        

_______4        Science w/Lab (4 CR HR)     

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

REL ___3        Religion Course

FIN 3113         Business Finance

ACC 2213       Intermediate Accounting II

ECN 2613       Macroeconomics

BUS 4553       Quantitative Methods in Business

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester    

CIS 3213         Technology Application in Business

MGT 3253      Statistical Reasoning 

AIS ____3       American Indian Studies       

ACC 3213       Cost Accounting        

LOGIC 3213  Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

15 Credit Hours         

 

Third Year Spring Semester

ACC 3313       Auditing

ACC 3113       Financial Statement Analysis

MGT 3333      Labor Relations Management

________3      Guided Elective

AES 2003       Creativity: Treasuring the Arts

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester  

FIN 3553         Money and Banking  

MGT 4113      Org. Behavior & Leadership Theory 

ACC 4313       Fund Accounting       

ACC 4213       Income Tax Accounting         

CIS 4113         Management Information Systems    

15 Credit Hours         

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

_______3        Guided Elective

BUS 4954       Problems in Business

_______3        Major Elective

_______3        Major Elective

BUS 4013       Business Ethics

16 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Accounting

 


18.4. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in General Business

Students who aspire to leadership positions in areas requiring significant subject matter expertise will find that Bacone’s program in General Business allows the flexibility needed to allow the development of expertise in a select subject area while developing the skills needed to manage or provide leadership.   Successful completion of the program requires students to meet Bacone’s general education requirements and the School of Business and Finance’s core requirement.  In addition, the successful student will develop, working with their advisor, a cognate of courses that meet the subject matter area of interest.

 

Recommended Course Sequencing for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in General Business:

 

First Year Fall Semester

MGT 2223      Principles of Management

MTH 1513     College Algebra

REL ____3     Religion Course

ENG 1113      English Composition I

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar

HPE ___1       HPE Course

16 Credit Hours

 

First Year Spring Semester

AIS ____3      American Indian Studies

SPC 1713       Introduction to Speaking and Thinking Critically

ENG 1213      English Composition II

MKT 2283      Principles of Marketing

________3     Guided Elective

HPE ____1     HPE Course (1 Credit Hour)

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester

ACC 2113      Financial Accounting

BUS 2143       Business Law I

ECN 2113      Microeconomics

________3     Minor/General Elective

________4     Science w/Lab (4 Credit Hour)

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Spring Semester

ACC 2123      Managerial Accounting

AES 2003       Creativity and Social Influences

BUS 4553       Quantitative Methods in Business

ECN 2613      Macroeconomics

________3     Minor/General Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester

CIS 3213        Technology Application in Businesses

MGT 3253      Statistical Reasoning

________3     Minor/General Elective

________3     Minor/General Elective

LOGIC 3213  Introduction to Critically Thinking and Informal Logic

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Spring Semester

HIS ____3      History Course

FIN 3113        Business Finance

________3     Minor/General Elective

________3     Literature Course

________3     Guided Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester

CIS 4113        Management Information Systems

MGT 4113      Organizational Behavior and Leadership Theory

________3     Upper Division Elective

________3     Upper Division Elective

________3     Minor/General Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

BUS 4013       Business Ethics

BUS 4954       Problems in Business

________3     Upper Division Elective

________3     Upper Division Elective

________3     Minor/General Elective

16 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit Hours for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in General Business

 


18.5. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Management

Management is a field concerned with applying social, psychological and economic theories of human behavior to problems of designing, leading and motivating the individuals that make up an organization.  Success in this area requires a broad range of understanding in the areas of finance and accounting, marketing, law, information system and decision science as it applies to the organization. Students in the area aspire to be leaders in business or non-profit organizations.  Bacone’s program seeks to provide students with a broad knowledge-base which will prepare them to be successful in a wide variety of organizations.

 

Successful completion of the program requires students to meet the Bacone’s general education requirements, the School of Business and Finance’s core requirements and the required course of study for the focus on management. All courses taken to satisfy the management focus require a grade of ‘C’.

 

Recommended Course Sequence Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Management

First Year Fall Semester

MGT 2223      Principles of Management

MTH 1513      College Algebra

ACC 2113       Financial Accounting

ENG 1113       English Composition I

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar

HPE ___1       HPE Course (1 Credit HR)

16 Total Credit Hours

 

First Year Spring Semester

ACC 2123      Managerial Accounting

HIS____3       History

ENG 1213      English Composition II

MKT 2283      Principles of Marketing

________3      Guided Elective

HPE ____1     HPE Course (1 Credit Hour)

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

_______3        Guided Elective         

BUS 2143       Business Law I           

ECN 2513       Microeconomics        

SPC 1713        Speaking & Thinking Critically         

_______4        Science w/lab (4 CR HR)      

16 Total Credit Hours

 

Second Year Spring Semester

REL ___3       Religion Course

FIN 3113        Business Finance

MGT 4553      Quantitative Methods in Business

ECN 2613       Macroeconomics

AIS ____3      American Indian Studies

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester                                   

CIS 3213         Technology Application in Business             

MGT 3253      Statistical Reasoning                     

MGT 3323      Human Resource Management     

ACC 3213       Cost Accounting                           

LOGIC 3213   Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic          

15 Credit Hours                                                     

 

Third Year Spring Semester

MKT 3313      Marketing Research

FIN 3553         Money & Banking

AES 2003       Creativity: Treasuring the Arts

LIT ____3       Literature Course

_______3        Guided Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester                                 

MGT ___3      Upper Level Management             

MGT 4113      Organizational Behavior and Leadership Theory      

ACC 4213      Federal Tax Accounting                

MKT ___3      Upper Level Marketing                 

CIS 4113         Management Information Systems

15 Credit Hours                                                     

 

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

MGT 3313      Production & Operations Management

BUS 4954       Problems in Business

_______3        General Elective

_______3        General Elective

BUS 4013       Business Ethics

16 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Management


18.6. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Marketing

Marketing is the process of communicating the value of a product or service to prospective consumers of the product or service. Bacone College’s program in marketing prepares students for careers in advertising, brand management, market research, media planning and public relations. Successful completion of the program requires students to meet the Bacone College’s general education requirements, the School of Business and Finance’s core requirements and the required course of study for the focus on marketing.  All courses taken to satisfy the marketing focus require a grade of ‘C’.

  

Recommended Course Sequence Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Marketing

 

First Year Fall Semester      

MGT 2223      Principles of Management     

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

ACC 2113       Financial Accounting 

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

HPE ___1       HPE Course (1 CR HR)         

16 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

ACC 2123       Managerial Accounting

HIS ____3       History

ENG 1213       English Composition II

MKT 2283      Principles of Marketing

________3      Guided Elective

HPE ____1     HPE Course (1CR HR)

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

MKT 3523      Buyer Behavior          

BUS 2143       Business Law I          

ECN 2513       Microeconomics        

SPC 1713        Speaking and Thinking Critically      

_______4        Science with Lab (4 CR HR) 

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

REL ___3        Religion

FIN 3113         Business Finance

MKT 3333      Social Media Marketing

ECN 2613       Macroeconomics

AIS ____3       American Indian Studies

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester    

SME 3113       Sport Marketing         

MGT 3253      Statistical Reasoning 

BUS 4553       Quantitative Methods in Business

MKT 3313      Retail management and Promotion   

LOGIC 3213 Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic           

15 Credit Hours         

 

Third Year Spring Semester

MKT 3113      Marketing Research

MKT 3413      Sales Management

MGT 3333      Labor Relations Management

________3      Guided Elective

________3      Guided Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester  

MKT 4113      Marketing Management        

MGT 4113      Org. Behavior & Leadership Theory 

BUS 3113       International Business

MKT 4313      Advertising Management      

CIS 4113         Management Information Systems    

15 Credit Hours         

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

BUS 4954       Problems in Business

BUS 4013       Business Ethics

_______3        Guided Elective

_______3        General Elective

_______3        General Elective

16 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Marketing

 

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Tribal Leadership

The Tribal Leadership focus is designed for students who aspire to leadership positions with tribal organizations or to roles in organizations that serve as business partners to tribal organizations.   The successful student develops a broad understanding of business processes and techniques within the context of tribal culture and traditions.

 

Successful completion of the program requires students to meet the Bacone College’s general education requirements, the School of Business and Finance’s core requirements and the required course of study for the focus on accounting. All courses taken to satisfy the tribal leadership focus require a grade of ‘C’.

Required Courses in Tribal Leadership 33 hours

AIS   3213       Federal Indian Policy

AIS   2113       American Indian Tribal Governments

AIS   3233       Tribal Sovereignty

AIS   3243       American Indian Women

AIS____ 3       Upper Level Elective

AIS   3203       Indigenous Leadership Principles

AIS   4013       Internship

CJS   3313       Federal and Tribal Law

MGT 4003      Leadership

MGT 4103      Change Management

MGT 4203      Business Management and Strategy

 

Recommended Course Sequence for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Tribal Leadership

 

First Year Fall Semester      

MGT 2223      Principles of Management     

MTH 1513     College Algebra          

ACC 2113      Financial Accounting 

ENG 1113      English Composition I

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar      

HPE ___1       HPE Course (1 CR HR)         

16 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

ACC 2123      Managerial Accounting

HIS ____3      History

ENG 1213      English Composition II

MKT 2283      Principles of Marketing

________3     Guided Elective

HPE ____1     HPE Course (1 CR HR)

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

BUS 2143       Business Law I

CJS 3313        Federal and Tribal Law          

ECN 2513      Microeconomics         

SPC 1713       Speaking and Thinking Critically      

_______4       Science w/lab (4 CR HR)       

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

REL ___3       Religion

BUS 4553       Quantitative Methods in Business

AIS 3213        Federal Indian Policy

ECN 2613      Macroeconomics

AIS ____3      American Indian Studies

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester    

AIS 3233        Tribal Sovereignty      

MGT 3253      Statistical Reasoning  

FIN 3113        Business Finance        

AIS 2113        American Indian Tribal Governments

_______3       Guided Elective          

15 Credit Hours         

 

Third Year Spring Semester

AIS 3343        American Indian Women

AIS ___3        AIS Upper Level Elective

_______3       Guided Elective

LOGIC 3213  Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

CIS 3273        Technical Applications in Business

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester  

MGT 4003      Leadership      

MGT 4113      Organizational Behavior & Leadership Theory         

MGT 4203      Business Management and Strategy  

________3     Social Science/Political Science        

CIS 4113        Management Information Systems    

15 Credit Hours         

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

AIS 3203        Indigenous Leadership Principles

BUS 4954       Problems in Business

MGT 4103      Change Management

AIS 4013        Internship

BUS 4013       Business Ethics

16 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Tribal Leadership


18.7. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Tribal Leadership

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Tribal Leadership
The Tribal Leadership focus is designed for students who aspire to leadership positions with tribal organizations or to roles in organizations that serve as business partners to tribal organizations. The successful student develops a broad understanding of business processes and techniques within the context of tribal culture and traditions.

Successful completion of the program requires students to meet the Bacone College’s general education requirements, the School of Business and Finance’s core requirements and the required course of study for the focus on accounting. All courses taken to satisfy the tribal leadership focus require a grade of ‘C’.

Required Courses in Tribal Leadership (33 hours)

AIS 3213Federal Indian Policy
AIS 2113American Indian Tribal Governments
AIS 3233Tribal Sovereignty
AIS 3243American Indian Women
AIS ____3Upper Level Elective
AIS 3203Indigenous Leadership Principles
AIS 4013Internship
CJS 3313Federal and Tribal Law
MGT 4003Leadership
MGT 4103Change Management
MGT 4203Business Management and Strategy

Recommended Course Sequence for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Tribal Leadership.

First Year Fall Semester
MGT 2223Principles of Management
MTH 1513College Algebra
ACC 2113Financial Accounting
ENG 1113English Composition I
CLE 1103First Year Seminar
HPE ___1HPE Course (1 CR HR)
16 Credit Hours
First Year Spring Semester
ACC 2123Managerial Accounting
HIS ____3History
ENG 1213English Composition II
MKT 2283Principles of Marketing
________3Guided Elective
HPE ___1HPE Course (1 CR HR)
16 Credit Hours
Second Year Spring Semester
REL ___3Religion
BUS 4553Quantitative Methods
CJS 3313Federal and Tribal Law
ECN 2613Macroeconomics
AIS 3213Federal Indian Policy
15 Credit Hours
Third Year Fall Semester
AIS 3233Tribal Sovereignty
MGT 3253Statistical Reasoning
FIN 3113Business Finance
AIS 2113American Indian Tribal Governments
_______3Guided Elective
15 Credit Hours
Third Year Spring Semester
AIS 3343American Indian Women
AIS ___3AIS Upper Level Elective
_______3Guided Elective
LOGIC 3213Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic
CIS 3273Technical Applications in Business
15 Credit Hours
Fourth Year Fall Semester
MGT 4003Leadership
MGT 4113Organizational Behavior & Leadership Theory
MGT 4203Business Management and Strategy
_______3Social Science/Political Science
CIS 4113Management Information Systems
15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester
AIS 3203Indigenous Leadership Principles
BUS 4954Problems in Business
MGT 4103Change Management
AIS 4013Internship
BUS 4013Business Ethics
16 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Emphasis in Tribal Leadership.


18.8. Bachelor of Science in Recreation Management

The major in Recreation Management degree prepares the student to work in professional settings such as church recreation, therapeutic recreation, directors of city recreation departments and private health clubs, ski instructors, community center supervisors, guides for wilderness trips, intramural sports directors, correctional recreation, adventure sport recreation, personal trainers, and corporate fitness directors. Graduates may also desire to pursue graduate degrees that may prepare them for highly specialized jobs in recreation or recreation management.

 

Minimum of 124 credit hours and 2.25 CGPA are required to graduate. All Degree Requirement Courses must have a grade of C or above.

 

Admission Requirements to Recreation Management

Freshman and transfer students must meet the following objectives for their specific degree plan:

 

For Recreation Management you must successfully complete the following course work to be transferred to the Department of Business:

 

  • Complete twenty-four credit hours toward their degree plan
  • Pass ENG 1213 English Composition II with a “C” or better
  • Pass College Algebra
  • Pass RME 1003 Principles of Recreation Management or equivalent with a “C” or better
  • Complete the reading requirement (advanced reading or sufficient ACT score)
  • Completion of the Reading Requirement
  • Completion of two from AIS/REL/SPC
  • Completion of 24 hours toward graduation

 

Required Total Gen Ed – 36 credit hours

For more detail, go to Bacone College Core Curriculum

Required Liberal Arts Electives – 9 credit hours

For more detail go to Bacone College Guided Electives

 

Required Courses in Recreation Management Core -- 52 credit hours

 

RME 1003      Principles of Recreation Management

ACC 2113       Financial Accounting

SME 2113       Sport Facility Management and Design

BUS 2143       Business Law I

MGT 2223      Principles of Management

MKT 2283      Principles of Marketing

RME 2303      Sport Officiating I

SME 3113       Sport Marketing

CIS 3213        Technology Applications in Business

RME 2433      Sociology of Sport and Recreation

RME 3403      Organization and Administration of Recreation and Sport

BUS 3313       Entertainment Hospitality and Tourism

BUS 4013       Business Ethics

SME 4113       Sport Law

SME 4303      Exercise and Sport Psychology

BUS 4954       Problems in Business

RME 4993      Recreation Management Internship

 

Preferred Business Elective Hours (9 credit hours from 3000 or 4000 level BUS, CIS, MGT, MKT, RME or SME courses)

General Elective Hours – 18 credit hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science in Recreation Management degree

 

 

Recommended Course Sequence Bachelor of Science in Recreation Management Degree

 

First Year Fall Semester      

________4      Science w/Lab (4 CR hr.)      

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

AIS ____3       American Indian Studies       

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

16 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

RME 1003      Introduction to Recreation Management

ENG 1213       English Composition II

ACC 2113       Financial Accounting

REL ___3        Religion

_______3        Liberal Art Guided Elective (ART/THE)

15 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

SME 2113       Sport Facility Management & Design           

SME 2403       Sociology of Sport and Recreation

SPC 1713        Speaking and Critically Thinking      

MGT 2283      Principles of Management     

________3      Liberal Art Guided Elective (LIT/COM/ENG)         

________1      General Elective        

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

BUS 2143       Business Law I

RME 2303      Sport Officiating I

MKT 2223      Principles of Marketing

_______3        General Elective

_______2        General Elective

_______3        Liberal Art Guided Elective (PSC/SOC)

17 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester    

BUS 3313       Entertainment, Hospitality, and Tourism       

CIS 3213         Technology Applications in Business

LOGIC 3213   Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic          

_______3        Preferred Business Elective

_______3        General Elective

15 Credit Hours         

 

Third Year Spring Semester

AES ___3       Creativity: __________________

RME 3403      Organization and Administration of Recreation and Sport

HIS ___3         History

SME 3113       Sport Marketing

_______3        Preferred Business Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester  

SME 4113       Sport Law      

BUS 4013       Business Ethics          

SME 4303       Exercise and Sport Psychology

_______3        General Elective        

_______3        Preferred Business Elective

15 Credit Hours         

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

SME 4993       Internship in Recreation Management

BUS 4954       Problems in Business

_______3        Preferred Business Elective

_______3        General Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science in Recreation Management degree. All Degree Requirement Courses must have a grade of C or above.

 


18.9. Bachelor of Science in Sport Management

Graduates with a major in Sport Management could pursue jobs as athletic directors, coaches on any academic level, sports team managers, armed forces sports coaches, sports administrators in private or semiprivate enterprises, municipal sports directors, front-office personnel and administrators with professional sports organizations, public colleges, and universities (facilities, marketing, media relations, and sports information), and in businesses that have a strong sports emphasis. In addition, graduates could go on to pursue graduate degrees that may prepare them for highly specialized jobs in sports.

 

Sport Management

Graduates with a major in Sport Management could pursue jobs as athletic directors, coaches on any academic level, sports team managers, armed forces sports coaches, sports administrators in private or semiprivate enterprises, municipal sports directors, front-office personnel and administrators with professional sports organizations, public colleges, and universities (facilities, marketing, media relations, and sports information), and in businesses that have a strong sports emphasis. In addition, graduates could go on to pursue graduate degrees that may prepare them for highly specialized jobs in sports. Minimum of 124 credit hours and 2.5 CGPA are required to graduate. All Degree Requirement Courses must have a grade of C or above.

 

Admission Requirements to Sport Management

Freshman and transfer students must meet the following objectives for their specific degree plan:

 

For Sport Management you must successfully complete the following course work to be transferred to the Department of Business:

  • Complete twenty-four credit hours toward their degree plan
  • Pass ENG 1213 English Composition II with a “C” or better
  • Pass College Algebra
  • Pass SME 1003 Principles of Sport Management or equivalent with a “C” or better
  • Complete the reading requirement (advanced reading or sufficient ACT score)
  • Completion of the Reading Requirement
  • Completion of two from AIS/REL/SPC
  • Completion of 24 hours toward graduation

 

Recommended Course Sequence Bachelor of Science in Sport Management

 

First Year Fall Semester                                     

________4      Science w/Lab (4 CR HR)

MTH 1513      College Algebra

ENG 1113       English Composition I

AIS ____3      American Indian Studies

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar

16 Credit Hours                                                     

 

First Year Spring Semester

ACC 2113       Financial Accounting

ENG 1213      English Composition II

SME 1003      Principles of  Sport Management

MGT 2223      Principles of Management

HIS ____3      History

15 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester                                 

ACC 2123      Managerial Accounting                 

MKT 2283      Principles of Marketing                 

SPC 1713        Introduction to Speaking and Thinking Critically     

AES ___3       Creativity: ______________         

_______3        Liberal Arts Guided Elective         

15 Credit Hours                                                     

 

Second Year Spring Semester

BUS 2143       Business Law I

SME 3113       Sport Marketing

SME 2113       Sport Facility Management and Design

REL ___3       Religion

ESE 2112        Personal Health

_______2        General Elective (2 CR HR)

16 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester                                    

CIS 3213        Technical Applications in Business                

MGT 3413      Sales Management                        

ESE 3403        Prevention and Care of Injuries     

LOGIC 3213  Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

_______3        Liberal Arts Guided Elective         

_______2        General Elective (2 CR HR)

17 Credit Hours                                                     

 

Third Year Spring Semester

SME 3003      Governing Bodies in Sport

BUS 4013       Business Ethics

SME 3213      Sport Communications

MGT 3323      Human Resource Management

________3      General Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester                                  

MGT 4113      Organizational Behavior               

SME 4113       Sport Law                                      

SME 4303      Exercise and Sport Psychology

________3      Liberal Arts Guided Elective         

________3      General Elective

15 Credit Hours                                                     

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

SME 4993      Internship in Sport Management

BUS 4954       Problems in Business

________3      General Elective

________3      General Elective

________3      General Elective

16 Credit Hours

125 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science Degree in Sport Management. and 2.5 CGPA are required to graduate. All Degree Requirement Courses must have a grade of C or above.


19. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Department of Education Summary

The Department of Education houses two early childhood non-certification programs, one teacher certification program, and a Family Studies Education program.   The Department collaborates with other divisions within the institution. The Chair of the Department of Education main responsibilities include: oversight of administrative functions of the Teacher Education program; maintaining an effective offering of courses; communication with P-12 partners; chair of Teacher Education Faculty Committee and chair of Teacher Education Council; and collaboration with the School of Art and Sciences faculty and administration. Other collaborative efforts are with Institutional faculty and outside stakeholders in the Family Studies Education Council.  Students complete coursework in both the Division of Education and other Divisions at Bacone College.

 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Education is to prepare highly qualified professionals who truly make the difference in the lives of others through their outstanding scholarship and rich knowledge base, appreciation of and adaptation to diversity, community involvement as it relates, and professionalism and high ethical standards.

 

  • Outstanding scholarship and rich knowledge base
  • Appreciation of and adaptation to diverse learners
  • Community involvement as it relates to education
  • Professionalism and high ethical standards

 

Thus, the overall theme of the Department of Education is “Teachers Make The Difference” through four components: Scholarship, Diversity, Community, and Professionalism.

 


19.1. Associate of Science in Child Development (non-licensure)

Graduates with a major in Child Development could pursue jobs as teachers in child care or Head Start programs and administer child care programs. The emphasis of this degree is to develop a strong understanding of how children develop and learn, the role of the family, and content and pedagogical knowledge of children age birth through eight.

 

  • This degree program is taught through the Division of Online Teaching and Learning and onsite coursework at Pawnee Nation College.
  • Minimum of sixty-six (65) credit hours for the Associate of Science Degree in Child Development with a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average, A “C” or better in Composition I and II, Speak/Think Critically, and all Major Concentration Courses.

 

Course Sequencing for Associate of Science in Child Development

 

First Year First Semester

CLE 1103       First Year Experience

ENG 1113      English Composition I

AIS 1103        Introduction to American Indian Studies

MTH 1513     College Algebra

12 Credit Hours

 

First Year Second Semester

ENG 1213       English Composition II

REL 1003        Introduction to Christianity

PSY, PSC, or SOC_____3

______3          ART/THE Liberal Arts Guided Elective

12 Credit Hours

 

 

First Year Third Semester

SPC 1713        Introduction to Speaking and Thinking Critically

ECH 2103       Child Development

ECH 2203       Health, Safety, & Nutrition

ECH 2102       Legal Issues in Early Childhood Development

PED 1002       Introduction to Education

13 Credit Hours

 

Second Year First Semester

BIO 1114        Human Biology w/lab

ECH 2102       Foundations of Early Childhood

ECH 2003       Creative Experience and Play

ESE 2112        Personal Health

PED 2002       Educational Technology

13 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Second Semester

FSE 2203        Addiction in the Family

FSE 2103        Families with Special Needs

PED 3113        Multicultural Issues in Education

9 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Third Semester

SOC 2223       The Family

_________3    Foreign Language (3 Cr Hr)

6 Credit Hours

 

65 Total Credit Hours for Associate of Science in Child Development


19.2. Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development and Education (non-licensure)


Recommended Course Sequence for Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development and Education

 

First Year Fall Semester      

BIO 1114        Human Biology         

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

AIS 1103         Introduction to American Indian Studies      

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

16 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

GPS 1114        General Physical Science

ENG 1213       English Composition II

PED 1002       Introduction to Education

HIS____3        US History

SPC 1713        Speaking and Thinking Critically

PED 2002       Education Technology

17 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

AES ____3     Aesthetics and Social Sciences         

ESE 2112        Personal Health          

ECH  2102      Foundations of Education      

PSC 2013        American Government

PED 2102       Legal Issues in Education      

MGT 2223      Principles of Management

15 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

ECH 3003       Creative Experience and Play

ECH 2203       Health Safety and Nutrition of Children

FSE 2103        Families with Special Needs

ECH 2103       Child Development (Birth-8 yrs)

REL ____3      Religion

16 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester    

LOGIC 3213   Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic          

PED 3203       Education of the Exceptional Child  

REA 3003       Child's Lit., Literacy, and Technology          

REA 3103       Literacy Language and Cognitive Development       

PED 2212       Motor Skills Dev. For the Young Child         

14 Credit Hours         

 

Third Year Spring Semester

PED 3113        Multicultural Issues in Education

PED 3103       Educational Psychology

ECH 3123       Infant and Toddler Brain Development

REA 3103       Literacy, Language, & Cognitive Development

ECH 3103       Family, School, & Community

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester  

ECH 4103       Integrated Curriculum & Assessment

ECH 4113       Organization and Admin of ECH Programs  

ECH 4203       Science Soc. Studies and Math in ECH        

PED 3303       Classroom Behavior Management    

FSE 2203        Addiction in the Family

15 Credit Hours         

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

ECH 4102       Capstone Seminar

ECH 4116       Capstone Experience

8 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit hours for Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development and Education

 


19.3. Bachelor of Arts in Family Studies Education (non-licensure)

The Mission of the Bachelor of Arts in Family Studies Education is to promote understanding of the consistent and dynamic factors found today in American families, and to equip students with the knowledge and practical skill sets to meet the needs of families found in current society.

·      Demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of individual and family development across the life span in diverse contexts and changing environments.

·      Demonstrate an ability to evaluate and apply research and theory to practice and policy.

·      Analyze processes, policies and contextual factors that affect the delivery of human services to individuals and families.

·      Demonstrate professional, ethical, and culturally sensitive standards of conduct.

·      Demonstrate knowledge and competence in helping, leadership, and administrative skills for human services.

·      Apply theoretical models of the major in clinical settings.

 

Completers of the Bachelor of Arts in Family Studies Education will be able to:

 

·      Identify and describe the role of Families in American Society.

·      Analyze the socio-economic, emotional and educational needs of people at various stages of their life.

·      Design research based and principled practices in the formation, implementation and evaluation of a variety of family experiences.

·      Construct a personal philosophy of service learning to the community at large and its role in being an ethical professional with human service practice.

·      Identify and Implement successful strategies regarding community based education for learners of varying age and social background.

·      Construct, Implement, and Evaluate action plans to meet specific family needs.

 

Indicators of Success

 

·      Successful completion of course work with a GPA of 2.5 in all courses listed in the minor.

·      Successful completion of field experiences in community and educational settings.  Educational settings are not limited to those of a public school.

 

Course sequencing for the Bachelor of Arts in Family Studies Degree

 

First Year Fall Semester

ENG 1113       English Composition I

AIS 1103        American Indian Studies

REL ____3     Religion Course

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar

FSE 1003        Introduction to Family Studies Education

_________     * Foreign Language Requirement (if applicable) Spanish or Native Language

15 Credit Hours

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213      English Composition II

SPC 1713        Speaking and Thinking Critically

MTH 1513      College Algebra

AES ____3     Treasuring the Arts

________4      Science Course w/Lab (4 CR HR)

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester

PED 2002       Educational Technology

PED 1002       Introduction to Education

ESE 2112        Personal Health

ECH 2203       Health, Safety, and Nutrition

FSE 2333        Ethnic and Non-Traditional Families

PED 2603       Human Growth and Development

_______3        Lower Division Emphasis Course I

18 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Spring Semester

FSE 2203        Addiction in the Family

SOC 2223       The Family

LOGIC 3213  Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

FSE 2103        Families with Special Needs

________3      Lower Division Emphasis Course II

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester

HIS 3333         Poverty in America

ECH 3103       Families, Schools and Communities

PED 3113        Multicultural Education

PED 3103       Educational Psychology

________3      Upper Division Emphasis I

FSE 3222        Family Finance

17 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Spring Semester

FSE 3403        Education of the Adult Population

PED 3203       Education of Exceptional Child

FSE 3113        Media and the Family

FSE 3333        Community Resources for the Family
SOC 1113        Introduction to Sociology

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester

FSE 4113        Research Proposal in Family Studies

FSE 4223        Death and Dying

FSE 3103        Aging and the Family

REA 3003       Children’s Lit, Literacy and Technology
ART/THE ____          3 hours

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

FSE 4116        Practicum in Family Studies

FSE 4153        Applications of Family Case Theory

_______3        Upper Division Emphasis II

12 Credit hours

 

124 Total Credit Hours in the Bachelor of Science in Family Studies Education Degree.

 


20. Division of Teacher Education General Information

Admission Requirements

All students in the Division of Teacher Education majoring in a degree program that leads to teacher certification are called Teacher Candidates.  Teacher Candidates in the Department of Education complete the process of Admission to Teacher Education. Complete a minimum of 45 hours of college credit with a CGPA of 2.5 or higher. (2.75 or higher CGPA required starting 6/1/15 for entry and exit from the program)

               

  • Demonstrate proficiency in written and oral English as indicated by having a grade of  “C” or higher in English Comp I, English Comp II,  and Speech.    
  • Complete PED 1002 and PED 3003 with a grade of “C” or higher.
  • Pass the Oklahoma General Education Test (OGET) with a score of 240 or higher.
  • Receive an acceptable criminal background check. 
  • Receive two (2) Recommendation and Disposition Assessments from General Education Faculty. Scores must be at a developing proficient or proficient levels as indicated on the Faculty Recommendation Form.
  • Pass Portfolio Checkpoint # I at a developing proficient or proficient level for all required submissions.
  • Submit documentation of experiences working with children.
  • Submit a typed biographical essay which includes why you want to be a teacher and their first and second philosophy of education.
  • Complete an Application to Teacher Education.           
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills and an understanding of DOE’s Conceptual Framework during a formal interview with the DOE Executive Education Council.
  • Receive a formal letter of approval for admission from the Director of Admission to Teacher Education. Admission to Teacher Education permits you to take DOE courses marked with an asterisk.

 

Teacher Candidates must also meet all requirements at each candidate checkpoint beyond admission to teacher education. Upon successful completion of Bacone College’s teacher preparation program and receiving passing scores on the Oklahoma General Education Test (OGET), the Oklahoma Specialty Area Test (OSAT) and the Oklahoma Professional Teaching Examination (OPTE), teacher candidates may apply for an Oklahoma state teaching license in the area of their certification. The license may be converted to a teaching certificate upon the successful completion of a residency year of public school teaching.

A passing score on the OGET in the area of initial certification is required for student teaching and graduation. A passing score on the OPTE is required before a recommendation is made for teacher licensure. Teacher candidates are responsible for paying for their licensure testing. Consult the State Department of Education for current costs.

 

Graduation Requirements

 A minimum of 124 credit hours and 2.5 CGPA are required to graduate. (2.75 or higher CGPA required starting 6/1/15 for entry and exit from the program) All Professional Education and Specialization Courses must have a grade of "C" or above. The Oklahoma General Education Test must be taken and passed in order to graduate. As of July 1, 2010 early childhood and elementary majors must pass with a minimum of 70% on the Oklahoma Reading Instruction Exam.

 

The Department of Education is accredited through the Office of Education Quality and Accountability (OEQA) and the Higher Learning Commission, North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Teacher Education Programs

Bacone College offers initial certification in one program, Elementary Education.

Teacher Education Mission

The philosophy of Bacone’s Department of Education rests on the belief that “Teachers Make the Difference.”   This is our theme statement. It is the belief of Bacone’s Department of Education that teachers must believe that all students have intrinsic value; that all students can learn; and that all teachers can teach.  Consistent with the vision of the founding father and the current mission of the college, the specific mission of the unit is to prepare highly qualified teachers, particularly from under-represented ethnic groups and especially from American Indian tribes, who truly make the difference in the classroom and in the lives of their students through…

  • Outstanding scholarship and rich knowledge base
  • Appreciation of and adaptation to diverse learners

·      Community involvement as it relates to education

  • Professionalism and high ethical standards

Thus the overall theme of the unit is TEACHERS MAKE THE DIFFERENCE through four components:  Scholarship, Diversity, Community, and Professionalism.

Checkpoints in Teacher Education – Students matriculate from declaration of the major to initial certification in three checkpoints, with a fourth after graduation and working as a teacher for one year.  Each checkpoint has key indicators of success which are summarized below:

Checkpoint

Criteria for Success

Checkpoint One Admission to Program

Freshman and Sophomore Year

2.75 GPA

Passing the OGET

Faculty Recommendations for Scholarship/Dispositions

Successful Field Placements

Entry Interview

Checkpoint Two – Program Candidate

Junior and Senior Year

2.75 GPA

Faculty Recommendations

Successful Field Placements

Checkpoint Three – Clinical Teaching

2.75 GPA

Exit Interview

Checkpoint Four – Post Graduation

Supervisors Review

Program Completer Survey

 

Department of Education enrollment requirements:

All students in the Department of Teacher Education majoring in a degree program that leads to teacher certification are called Teacher Candidates. Teacher Candidates in Education complete the process of Admission to Teacher Education after 45 hours of college credit, a minimum of CGPA of 2.75, a minimum grade of "C" in English Composition I, English Composition II, and Speech, and a passing score on the Oklahoma General Education Test (OGET).  Admission to Teacher Education is required for many of the required Professional and Specialization Courses. For a complete listing of the admission requirements for Education please visit with the Department Chair of Education.


20.1. Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education

The Bacone College Elementary Education initial licensure program consists of coursework and field experiences leading to a Bachelor of Arts Degree.  This program provides a broad academic background and the specific professional education knowledge and skills necessary to prepare teacher candidates to teach children in First through Eighth Grades.

 

Many courses have extensive fieldwork and are taught at public school sites.  Such clinical experiences enable the teacher candidate to observe and assist in school classrooms throughout the college experience.  Full-time student teaching provides guidance and support from experienced cooperating teachers and a college supervisor as teacher candidates assume responsibility for planning and teaching in an elementary, intermediate or middle school classroom.  With a degree in Elementary Education, students can pursue other teaching areas.

 


Course Sequencing for Bachelor of Arts Degree in Elementary Education

 

First Year Fall Semester

ENG 1113       English Composition I

MTH 1513      College Algebra

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar

COM 1113      Media Culture

BIO 1114        Human Biology

16 Credit Hours

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213       English Composition II

MTH 1713      Geometry

AIS_____3      American Indian Course

GPS 1114        General Physical Science

SPC 1713        Speaking/Thinking Critically

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester

PED 2002       Educational Technology

ESE 2112        Personal Health

PSC____3       American Government

REL____3      REL 1003, 1013, 2253, or 2513

MTH 2003      Math Concepts I

_______4       Science Elective (4 hrs)

17 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Spring Semester

PED 1002       Introduction to Education

PED 2102       Legal Issues in Education

ECH 2003       Creative Experience and Play (Meets Core for Art)

MTH 3003      Math Concepts II

PED 3003       Foundations of Education

PSY/SOC        Psychology or Sociology Elective

HIS ____         History Elective

                       

19 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester

REA 3003       Children's Literature, Literacy, and Technology

REA 3203       Literacy Development and Assessment I

PED 3113        Multicultural Issues in Education

PED 3203       Education of the Exceptional Child

PED 3303       Classroom Behavior Management     

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Spring Semester

PED 3103       Educational Psychology

REA 3203        Literacy Development and Assessment

AES____       Aesthetics

LOGIC 3213   Introduction to Informal Logic and Critical Thinking

_____ 3 Spanish/Foreign Language

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester

ELE    4003     Language Arts in Upper Elementary

ELE    4103     Integrated Curriculum and Assessment

ELE    4203     Social Studies Methods

ELE    4303     Science Methods

ELE    4403     Math Methods

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

ELE 4115        Elementary Student Teaching (Grades 1-3)

ELE 4125        Elementary Student Teaching (Grades 4-8)

PED 4202       Educational Seminar

12 Total Hours

 

125 Total Credit Hours for Bachelor of Arts Degree in Elementary Education

 


21. DIVISION OF LIBERAL ARTS AND HUMANITIES


21.1. Associate of Arts in Art

Bacone College is well known for its contributions to American Indian art through its continuing legacy of outstanding American Indian artists who have collectively created what is known as the Bacone School of Art by serving as instructors and directors of the Art Department. Acee Blue Eagle became the first director in 1935. Woodrow “Woody” Crumbo, Dick West, and Chief Terry Saul followed him.

Art studies concentrate on the development of basic skills. Composition, perspective, color theory, and craftsmanship are stressed in all classes. Courses are offered in two and three-dimensional design. They include drawing, sculpture, painting, bronze casting, Indian arts and crafts, and silversmithing.  Bacone College has had many graduates who have gone on to successful careers as fine artists, visual art educators, museum professionals, and graphic designers.

Bacone College School of Indian Art Mission Statement: The faculty, Administration and staff are committed to educating students who aspire for a career in the visual arts, while emphasizing cultural diversity, community engagement, and technical innovation.


Course Sequence:

The following course of study is recommended for those wishing to earn an Associate of Arts Degree in Art.  Students are encouraged to choose from among the broad variety of course choices available, in consultation with the adviser, to provide the most benefit for the student’s future goals.

 Associate of Arts in Art

 

First Year Fall Semester      

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

REL ___3        Religion         

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

_______3        Art Elective    

_______2        General Elective (2 CR HR)  

17 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Fall Semester

ENG 1213       English Composition II

SPC 1713        Speaking & Thinking Critically

_______3        Art Elective

_______3        Art Elective

_______3        General Elective

_______2        General Elective (2 CR HR)

17 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

_______4        Science w/Lab (4 CR HR)     

_______3        Art Elective    

_______3        Art Elective    

_______3        Liberal Art Guided Elective  

_______3        General Elective        

_______1        General Elective (1 CR HR)  

17 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

AIS ___3         American Indian Studies

_______3        Art Elective

_______3        Art Elective

_______3        Liberal Art Guided Elective

_______3        General Elective

_______2        General Elective (2 CR HR)

17 Credit Hours

 

68 Total Credit Hours for Associate of Arts in Art Degree

 


21.2. Associate of Arts in Christian Ministry

The following is recommended for those students wishing to earn an Associate of Arts in Christian Ministry.

 

Recommended Course Sequence for Associate of Arts in Christian Ministry

 

First Year Fall Semester      

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

REL ___3        Religion         

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

REL ___3        Religion Elective       

_______1        General Elective (1 CR HR)  

16 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213       English Composition II

SPC 1713        Speaking & Thinking Critically

REL ____3      Religion Elective

REL ____3      Religion Elective

________3      General Elective

________2      General Elective (2 CR HR)

17 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

________4      Science w/lab (4 CR HR)      

REL ____3      Religion Elective       

REL ____3      Religion Elective       

________3      General Elective        

________3      Liberal Arts Guided Elective 

                       

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

AIS ____3       American Indian Studies

REL _____3    Religion Elective

________3      General Elective

________3      General Elective

________3      Liberal Arts Guided Elective

REL ____1      Religion Special Study (1CR HR)

16 Credit Hours

 

65 Total Credit Hours for Associates of Arts in Christian Ministry

 

Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts

Course Sequencing for Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts

 

First Year Fall Semester      

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

MTH 1513      College Algebra         

ILS 1113         History and Philosophy of Liberal Arts         

_______3        General Elective (1 of 3)       

_______1        Club Activity or Team Credit* (1 CR hr.)     

16 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213       English Composition II

REL 1003        Introduction to Christianity

________4      Science Course w/lab (4 CR hrs.)

________3      Liberal Arts Guided Elective (1 of 2)

________3      General Elective (2 of 3)

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

SPC 1713        Speaking and Thinking Critically      

ILS 2113         Exploring Ideas & Concepts I (or ILS 2223)

CIS 2113         Information in Modern Society         

_______3        Liberal Arts Discipline (AIS/HIS/PSC/ECN)

_______3        Liberal Arts Discipline (AES/PSY/REL/SOC)         

_______1        Club Activity or Team Credit* (1 CR hr.)     

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

AIS 1103         Introduction to American Indian Studies

AES ___3       Creativity: ___________________

_______3        Liberal Arts Discipline (VISUAL/PERF. ARTS)

_______3        Liberal Arts Discipline (ENG/DRAMA/LANG/LIT)

_______3        Liberal Arts Guided Elective (2 of 2)

_______1        General Elective 1* CR HR. (3 of 3)

16 Credit Hours

*If student does not participate in an activity or sport, then student must take a 3-hour General Elective course.

 

64 Total Credit Hours for the Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts degree.


21.3. Bachelor of Art in Christian Ministry

Bacone College is well known for its contributions to Christian ministry in both the general and American Indian cultures.  The mission of the baccalaureate degree in Christian Ministry is to provide the theological foundation needed for those individuals committed to work in the field of mission and ministry.  The program design focuses on the opportunity to engage in practice while learning.  This postmodern approach of reflection in action is thought to be essential for preparing students to minister in our fast paced global society.

 

Students seeking this degree will have a variety of courses available to prepare them for a life journey that involves serving humanity through a church related setting.  Christian ministry studies concentrate on the development of certain basic skills useful for both lay and ordained leaders.

 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Christian Ministry degree programs of Bacone College is to prepare Christian leaders who will know the Word and the world and be able to bring them together to the spreading of the Kingdom of God. Students who complete this program will  know the  Christ and be able to present the Christ to a  multi-cultural, multiethnic World. This degree is designed for students seeking to serve God through church and para-church ministries as well as for those pursuing a ministry of advanced Biblical scholarship through graduate studies in seminary. The Christian Ministry Bachelor Degrees are four-year, 124-hour program that provides a solid foundation in General Education, Bible and Practical Ministry. The program is a marriage of academic preparation and practical, hands-on experience that encourages learning by doing and reflection on experience. 

 

Objectives of the Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Degree

·       To assist the student in discerning a personal call to ministry and setting a plan for carrying out that calling

·       To form the student spiritually to live faithfully by submitting to the authority of Scripture as a guide for living

·       To help the student to develop an integrated Christian worldview by critically interacting with history, culture, ethics, and sciences

·       To provide the student with the tools to exegete the message of the Old and New Testaments and present that message in a multicultural, multiethnic environment

·       Develop skills in leading, teaching, worship, and practical ministry in a multicultural, multiethnic setting through academic training and practical experience

 

The following course of study is recommended for those wishing to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministries Degree. Students are encouraged to choose from among the broad variety of course choices available, in consultation with the adviser, to provide the most benefit for the student’s future goals.

 


Recommended Course Sequence for Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Degree

 

First Year Fall Semester      

CLE 1103        First Year Seminar     

MTH ___3      College Algebra or Math Structures (3 cr. Hrs.)

ENG 1113       English Composition I          

REL 1003        Introduction to Christianity   

MIN 1103       Introduction to Christian Ministry     

15 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213       English Composition II

SPC 1713        Speaking & Thinking Critically

MIN 1123       Principles of Biblical Research and Writing

MIN 1143       New Testament Literature

AIS ____3       American Indian Studies (3 cr. Hrs.)

________2      General Elective (2 CR HR)

17 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

_______4        Science w/lab (4 CR HR)      

MIN 1223       Old Testament Literature       

AES 2003       Creativity: Treasuring the Arts          

_______2        General Elective (2 cr. Hrs.)  

_______3        Liberal Arts Guided Elective  (3 cr. Hrs.)      

15 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

MIN 1213       Life of Christ

REL 2253        World Religions

MIN 2313       Pedagogy

MIN 2233       Contextualized Ministry

HIS ____3       History (3 cr. Hrs.)

________2      General Elective (2 CR HR)

17 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester    

MIN 3993       Internship I    

REL 3113        Christian Ethics         

MIN 3123       Postmodern Christianity        

_______3        Christian Ministry Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

LOGIC 3213  Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

15 Credit Hours         

 

Third Year Spring Semester

MIN 3313       Homiletics

MIN 3213       Studies of the Gospels

MIN 4996 Internship II

________3      Christian Ministry Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester  

MIN 4313       Church Administration          

MIN 4993       Internship       

________3      Christian Ministry Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)         

________3      Christian Ministry Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)         

________3      Christian Ministry Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)         

15 Credit Hours         

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

_______6        Capstone (6 CR HR)

MIN 4996       Internship

_______3        Christian Ministry Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

15 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit Hours for the Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Degree


21.4. Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry with Emphasis in Christian Counseling

The Christian Counseling Concentration within the Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry at Bacone College is designed for those desiring to gain competency in Christian counseling skills. Students who successfully complete the Christian Counseling Concentration will be prepared for basic pastoral counseling. This concentration combines excellent academic training, actual ministry experience, and theological reflection on that experience. Students who successfully complete this program will receive, in addition to a Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry, certification in counseling from the National Christian Counselors Association.


Recommended Course Sequence for the Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry with Emphasis in Christian Counseling

 First Year Fall Semester

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar

MTH 1513     College Algebra

ENG 1113      English Composition I

REL 1013       Sociology of Christianity

MIN ___3       1223 or 1143 Christian Ministry Course

15 Credit Hours

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213      English Composition II

SPC 1713       Speaking and Thinking Critically

HIS ____3      2013 or 2233 Christianity in a Postmodern World or American Civilization or History

________3     Liberal Arts Guided Elective

MIN ____3     1223 or 1143 Christian Ministry Course

MIN 2431       Mentored Internship

16 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester

ESE 2112       Personal Health

______4         Science with Lab

______3         Liberal Arts Guided Elective

MIN 2432       Mentored Internship

AES 2003       Creativity: Treasuring the Arts

REL 2253       World Religions

17 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Spring Semester

AIS ____3      American Indian Studies

________3     Liberal Arts Guided Elective

MIN 2533       Mentored Internship

MIN 1213       Life of Christ

MIN 2443       Foundations of Pastoral Counseling

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester

MIN 3993       Mentored Internship

REL 3113       Christian Ethics

MIN 3413       Crisis Counseling in Ministry

_______3       Christian Ministry Elective

LOGIC 3213 Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

15 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Spring Semester

MIN 3513       Family Systems in Christian Counseling

MIN 3213       Studies of the Gospel

MIN 3123       Postmodern Christianity

MIN 4993       Mentored Internship

_______3       Christian Ministry Elective

15 Credit Hours

 

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester

MIN 4313       Church Administration

MIN 4883       Certification in Christian Counseling I

MIN 3313       Homiletics

MIN 4996       Mentored Internship

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

MIN 4416       Capstone Project and Ministry Paper

MIN 3596       Christian Counseling Internship

_______3       Christian Ministry Elective

MIN 4893       Certification in Christian Counseling II

18 Credit Hours

 

126 Total Credit Hours for the Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry with Emphasis in Christian Counseling


21.5. Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry with Concentration in American Indian Ministry

Description of the Concentration

American Baptists have long been leaders in the effort to reach and teach American Indians.  Roger Williams, founder of the first Baptist Church in Rhode Island, was one of the first missionaries to American native peoples. In 1880, Almon Bacone founded Bacone College with a mission to train preachers and teachers to work among the native tribes.  The Concentration in American Indian Ministry within the Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry is in partial fulfillment of this mission. 

The Concentration in American Indian Ministry within the Bachelor of Christian Ministry degree program is designed to equip students spiritually and technically to be leaders in native congregations.  The successful student will learn to bring the American Indian world and the Word together.  In keeping with the goals of the Christian Ministry degree program, this concentration is a marriage of academic preparation and practical, hands-on experience that encourages learning by doing and reflection on experience.  

Goals of the Concentration

The goal of the Concentration in American Indian Ministry is to develop Christian leaders who will be prepared to evangelize, disciple, and develop leaders in the native church.

Specifically, the successful student will

  • Develop a philosophy of American Indian ministry utilizing the concepts of contextualization, redemptive analogy, and incarnational ministry
  • Display the unique characteristics of effective leadership that are exercised for effectiveness in the native church
  • Demonstrate an understanding of biblical hermeneutics through the lens of native culture, life and tradition
  • Demonstrate skills in preaching and teaching in the context of the native church
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how, in Christian counseling, to apply the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the  “soul wounding” of American Indians that has resulted in intergenerational trauma as acted out in alcoholism, family dysfunction, abuse, high suicide rates, and hopelessness
  • Gain experience in working with native American churches and ministries which will allow them to apply their learnings in a real ministry situation

 

Courses:

In addition to the 39 hours required of all Christian Ministry majors, the AI Concentration will include the following courses:

 

MIN 2553 Foundations in American Indian Ministry            3 hours           

MIN 3333 American Indian Hermeneutics                            3 hours

MIN 4323 American Indian Theology                                   3 hours

MIN 4533 Christian Counseling with American Indians       3 hours

MIN 3323 American Indian Homiletics                                 3 hours

MIN 4523 Internship in American Indian Ministry               3 hours

 

Students in the Concentration will also take 1 semester of MIN4523  Internship in American Indian Ministry (3 hours).  This will serve as 3 hours of the required 12 hours of internship experience.

Courses to be used as Directed Liberal Arts Electives:

·       Students will take LIT 2333 American Indian Literature to meet LIT requirement in the Directed Liberal Arts Electives

·       Students will take  ART 1413 American Indian Art I for their ART elective in the Directed Liberal Arts Electives

 

 

 


21.6. Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Concentrations

The B.A. in Liberal Arts at Bacone College is a four-year program requiring 124 hours of study, including 36 hours in core curriculum, 12 in Liberal Arts guided electives, 13 in core liberal arts courses, 24 credits in discipline concentration and 39 credits drawn from three areas of concentration related to the major, including Social Sciences, Humanities and Language.  The BA in Liberal Arts conforms to Bacone College’s mission statement, particularly to the study and understanding of indigenous peoples and culture and the roots of Christianity in Western Tradition.

 

Students may choose a concentration in English, History, Communications or Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies.  Each concentration consists of 24 credit hours which would enable them to be considered a content specialist to apply for a special certification track in teaching in secondary education.

 

The primary aim of this degree is to develop a capacity in the student for critical thinking vis-a-vis a course of study both broad enough to foster a healthy curiosity for different ideas that have shaped our Western civilization and focused enough to provide valuable lifelong knowledge that can be applied in any professional situation.  This course of study aims to introduce the student to the world of Liberal Arts -- its history and philosophy, its place in (past and present) human society. The study of the Liberal Arts (philosophy, literature, language, the Arts, history, social sciences, natural science) provides students with a broad knowledge of how great thinkers over time have approached the world’s compelling concerns.

Goals of the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts at Bacone College provides students with broad knowledge of the wider world (e.g. science, culture, and society) as well as in-depth study in a specific area of interest. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts at Bacone College provides the student a liberal education—including, for example, philosophy, art and sociology—educates the whole person, and prepares students to excel in a range of careers and, most importantly, live lives rich with meaning and purpose. 

 

The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts at Bacone College seeks to develop free human beings who know how to use their minds and can think for themselves.

 

The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts at Bacone College does not have as its primary aim the development of professional competence, although a liberal education is indispensable for any intellectual profession.

 

In keeping with the mission of Bacone College to provide higher education to American Indians, the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts at Bacone College includes mandatory American Indian Literature and The Bible as Literature classes as well as options in a proposed course in Navaho language and American Indian Film studies, both new courses. The History concentration includes mandatory History of American Religions and Native American History components.

 

Concentration in English

 

Description of the Concentration:

In the age of technology and mass media, English is, and has always been, a critical course of study, and the outlook for the study of English is good and getting better. Nowadays employers are looking to hire English majors because these applicants bring a set of skills that businesses need.

Goals of the English Concentration:

The English Concentration provides the student with communications skills.  In a recent survey, employers rated the "ability to verbally communicate with persons inside and outside the organization” as the most important candidate skill. Communication is at the heart of any business;

The English Concentration provides the student with Writing SkillsA Metlife survey found that 97 percent of business executives rate writing skills as very important. English majors, more than any other major, are trained to write well. A major part of what business owners do to gain clients has to do with writing;

The Concentration in English provides the student will researching Skills: employers need to have absolute accuracy in any communications with clients rendering those who excel in conducting research a very viable asset.

The Concentration in English provides the student with important Critical Thinking Skills. The ability to analyze issues and question assumptions is essential to business of any stripe; English majors are adept at deconstructing and analysis, and then to package their findings into understandable terms;

The Concentration in English teaches the student Empathy.  More and more, businesses are recognizing the importance of empathy in the workplace; English majors have a major advantage.

 

English Courses for Concentration

 

INTRO TO LIT: LIT 2013 (3 Credit Hours)

AMERICAN INDIAN LIT: LIT 2333 (3 Credit Hours)

BIBLE AS LIT: LIT 2633 (3 Credit Hours)

AMERICAN LIT II:   LIT 2883 (3 Credit Hours)

GENRE LITERATURE I & II: LIT 3113 and LIT 3123 (3 Credit Hours)

SHORT STORY: LIT 3693

SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH I: LIT 3413 (3 Credit Hours)

SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH II: LIT 3423 (3 Credit Hours)

 

Concentration in History

 

Description:

The outlook for the study of history is good and getting better. Nowadays employers are looking to hire History majors because these applicants bring a set of skills that businesses need.  In addition, the History Concentration will develop communication skills, research and writing skills, the ability to think critically and to understand appreciate the cultural, racial, ethnic, and spiritual diversity of the world in which we live.  Students who complete the History Concentration can apply for special certification for public school teaching.

Goals of the Concentration:

 The History Concentration will provide students with the breadth (geographical and chronological) and depth of knowledge of particular landmarks of human history and an understanding of their significance;

 The History Concentration will enable students to recognize and appreciated the diversity of people and societies, both historically and cross-culturally;

 The History Concentration will train students in the use of the historical methodology, the means by which historians execute their research, with competence and creativity;

 In keeping with the mission of Bacone College to provide higher education to American Indians, the History Concentration will develop an appreciation of history of First Peoples in North American and the growth, development, and impact of Christianity in the world

 History Courses for Concentration

 

American Civilization II: HIS 2333 (3 Credit Hours)

Western Civilization II: HIS 2123 (3 Credit Hours)

History of American Religions: HIS 2633 (3 Credit Hours)

Historiography:  HIS 2883 (3 Credit Hours)

American Labor History: HIS 3243 (3 credits)

American Social History: HIS 3223 (3 Credit Hours)

American Indian History II: HIS 3023

Special Topics in History.  HIS 3693 

 

 

Concentration in Communications

 

Description of the Concentration:

 

In an age of Mass Media, Social Media, and e-commerce, the Concentration in Communication promotes questioning, seeking, discovery, analysis, and understanding the mass media. Students pursuing the Concentration in Communication will learn how to be excellent communicators and know how to analyze the mass media in its many pervasive forms – newspapers, television, film, radio, web, social media, cyber culture and various new media forms. The Communication Concentration at Bacone College meets the need of having a degree that teaches students about the mass media in the second decade of the 21st century. Students pursuing a degree in Communication learn how to be more effective communicators

 

Goals of the Concentration:

 

The Concentration provides students with broad knowledge of the wider world as seen through the eyes of mass media, film, Social Media, and mass communications.. 

The Concentration in Communications will provide the student broad background in the liberal arts—including for example, philosophy, art and sociology—which will provide them with a basis for communication in the media

 The Concentration in Communication will provide the student with skills in media development, production and presentation

 In keeping with the mission of Bacone College to provide higher education to American Indians, the Communications Concentration includes mandatory American Indian Film or Religious Film which serve as companion pieces to American Indian Literature and The Bible as Literature (English) and History of American Religions and Native American History (History).

 

 

Concentration in Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies

 

 

Description of the Concentration:

 

The Concentration in Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies is an eclectic course of study with a generalist thrust. This generalist focus has the advantage of drawing coursework from the best of the other concentrations plus coursework from the Bacone curriculum at large. Besides allowing the student to personalize his or her own degree it also has the advantage of pursuing coursework s/he is enthusiastic about. A third advantage is that the interdisciplinary option is the epitome of the spirit of Liberal Arts and critical thinking. It is said that most college graduates are unprepared for the content of their future jobs since a multitude of jobs have not yet been created.  If this is so, the student who has focused on eclectic coursework has the upper hand. The Interdisciplinary degree holder brings a fresh set of skills that future employers will need.  The Interdisciplinary degree is perhaps the best program to prepare the student for applying their knowledge to other disciplines, to satisfy the latest needs of employers looking for both field-specific skills and broad skills. Because the student has so many avenues of study open to him or her s/he can enter many fields for employment: including advertising, business, marketing, public relations, journalism, broadcasting, media, and film, to name a few. Combining this with another major degree, such as business, science or technology, will only add to an optimum competitive advantage

 Goals of the Concentration:

The Concentration in Interdisciplinary Studies provides students with broad knowledge of the wider world (e.g. science, culture, and society) as well as in-depth study in a specific area of interest. 

 The Concentration in Interdisciplinary Studies with a liberal education—including, for example, philosophy, art and sociology—educates the whole person, and prepares students to excel in a range of careers and, most importantly, live lives rich with meaning and purpose. 

The Concentration in Interdisciplinary Studies seeks to develop free human beings who know how to use their minds and can think for themselves.

 The Concentration in Interdisciplinary Studies is not intended to prepare people for professional competence, although a liberal education is indispensable for any intellectual profession.

In keeping with the mission of Bacone College to provide higher education to American Indians, the Interdisciplinary degree includes many more possibilities of coursework in indigenous peoples and religion, literally all those in the catalogue (and beyond, for that matter, in the form of guided studies and interdisciplinary/team-taught courses).



22. RENNARD STRICKLAND SCHOOL OF TRIBAL LAW AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The purpose of the Criminal Justice Studies program is to provide the student with a system orientation to the field of Criminal Justice. Study in Criminal Justice involves the application of the principles of Criminal Justice and the related behavioral and social sciences to problems and issues in the field. The program focuses on building knowledge in the areas of law enforcement, courts and corrections. Within the program students will develop a knowledge base for an in-depth understanding of human behavior and the kinds of problems and circumstances that often result in criminality. Furthermore, the program provides students with the opportunity to gain necessary skills in the area of interviewing, program development, community organizations, planning and research within the field of criminal justice. The Associate of Science in Criminal Justice curriculum is intended to provide its graduates with the necessary foundation for a successful career.


22.1. Associate of Science in Criminal Justice Studies


Course Sequencing for the Associate of Science in Criminal Justice Studies

 

First Year Fall Semester      

CJS 1103        Introduction to Criminal Justice

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar

MTH 1513      College Algebra or MTH 1493 Math Structures       

CJS 1123        Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime    

ENG 1113       English Composition I           

15 Credit Hours

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213      English Composition II

REL1003        Introduction to Christianity

CJS 2303        Courts and Constitutional Law          

CJS 2313        State Criminal Law

CJS 2613        Law Enforcement      

CJS _____      CJS Elective (3 cr. hrs.)

18 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

SPC1713         Speaking and Thinking Critically

CJS 2413        Federal Corrections   

SOC 2213       Intro to Social Work   

________        Science w/lab (4 cr. hrs.)       

________        Liberal Arts Guided Elective (LIT/HIS/ART/THE- 3 cr. Hrs.)

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

PSY 1113        Introduction to Psychology

CJS 2513        Forensics I

CJS ____        CJS Elective (3 cr. hrs.

AIS ____        American Indian Studies (3 credits)

________        Liberal Arts Guided Elective (LIT/HIS/ART/AES- 3 cr. Hrs.)

15 Credit Hours

 

64 Total Credit Hours for Associate of Science in Criminal Justice Studies


22.2. Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Studies

The Baccalaureate Program of Criminal Justice Studies is the study of the structure, functions and decision-making processes of the police, courts and correctional agencies involved in the control and management of criminal offenders.  The discipline examines the causes and patterns of criminal behavior and the role of the law in regulating both crime and the operation of the criminal justice system.  Furthermore, the program provides students with the opportunity to gain necessary skills in the area of program development and evaluation as well as planning and research within the field of criminal justice.

The Baccalaureate Degree in Criminal Justice Studies will serve the following types of students:

·       Those seeking a four-year degree as a prerequisite for entry into the criminal justice field;

·       Those currently in service in the criminal justice system who seek to broaden their skills and obtain job-related knowledge and expertise, and

·       Those currently in the criminal justice system who seek to specialize and/or work in some other area of the system.

*  Introduction to Psychology is a course requirement in this category.


Recommended Course Sequence for Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Studies

First Year Fall Semester      

ENG 1113       English Composition I

CJS 1103        Introduction to Criminal Justice        

CLE 1103       First Year Seminar     

MTH ____      MTH 1513 College Algebra   or MTH 1493 Math Structures

________3      Liberal Arts Guided Elective (ART/AES/COM/LIT- 3 cr. Hrs.)

15 Credit Hours         

 

First Year Spring Semester

ENG 1213      English Composition II

CJS 2303        Courts and Constitutional Law

CJS 1123        Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime

CJS 2313        State Criminal Law

_______3        Liberal Arts Guided Elective (PSC/SOC) – 3 cr. Hrs.

15 Credit Hours

 

Second Year Fall Semester  

SPC 1713        Speaking and Thinking Critically      

_______          Science course w/lab (4 CR Hrs.)      

CJS 2213        Juvenile Justice          

CJS 2613        Law Enforcement       

CJS 2413        Federal Corrections

16 Credit Hours         

 

Second Year Spring Semester

ESE 2112        Personal Health (2 credits)

REL ____       Religion Course (3 cr. hrs.)

SOC 2113       Social Problems

CJS 3313        Federal & Tribal Criminal Law

AIS ____        American Indian Studies

CJS 3623        Criminal Investigations

17 Credit Hours

 

Third Year Fall Semester                

HIS ____        History Course (3 cr. Hrs)      

PSY 1113        Introduction to Psychology    

CJS 2513        Forensics I

CJS ____        CJS Elective    (3 cr. Hrs.)      

CJS ____        CJS Elective (3 cr. Hrs)

15 Credit Hours         

 

Third Year Spring Semester

SOC 2213       Intro to Social Work

LOGIC 3213 Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

CJS ____        CJS Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

CJS ____        CJS Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

CJS ____        CJS Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

15 Credit Hours

 

Fourth Year Fall Semester  

AES ___         Aesthetics or Humanities (3 credits)

CJS 4013        State Corrections

________        Liberal Arts Guided Elective (LIT/COM/ENG- 3 cr. Hrs.)   

CJS ____        CJS Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

CJS ____        CJS Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

15 Credit Hours         

 

Fourth Year Spring Semester

CJS 4954        Capstone (4 credits)—Mandatory Capstone Exam

CJS 3113        Social Ethics

CJS 4996        CJS Internship (6-12 hrs)

CJS ____        CJS Elective (3 cr. Hrs.)

16 Credit Hours

 

124 Total Credit Hours in the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Studies


23. DIVISION OF ONLINE TEACHING AND LEARNING

The Division of Online Teaching and Learning (DOTL) was created to meet the needs of individuals and groups through a variety of non-traditional formats. This Center focuses on working adults and non-traditional learners by providing associate and bachelor degree programs in an accelerated 8 week online format. By offering associate and bachelor degree programs the Center provides learners with the opportunity to obtain and enhance the lifelong skills necessary to succeed in a dynamic global society.

Associate Degree Programs

The Associate of Arts degree is designed for those who desire to complete a fully accredited online associates degree. Students seeking the associate degree completion in this program must transfer a minimum of 33 credit hours from a regionally accredited college or university. They will complete a minimum of 31 additional credit hours of Bacone College coursework in our degree completion format.

Bachelor Degree Programs

Bacone College's Online Degree Completion Programs for the Bachelor’s Degree are designed for those students who desire to complete a fully accredited online bachelor degree. Students seeking a degree in this program must hold an associate’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university, or have earned sufficient credit to enroll in the program. They will complete a minimum of 60 additional credit hours of Bacone College coursework in the degree completion format.

 

Degrees Offered through the Division of Online Teaching and Learning

 

·      Associate of Science in Child Development

 

·      Associate of Science in Business Administration

 

·      Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry

 

·      Bachelor of Science in Business Administration  

 

·      Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Development and Education

 

·      Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Studies

 

Refer to the specific Academic Program for information on degree requirements and course sequencing.


24. 2020-2021 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


Courses that meet Bacone Core Curriculum requirements are designated as BACONE CORE. Please refer to the Bacone College Core Curriculum in the Bacone Catalog.


24.1. ACC - ACCOUNTING

 

ACC 2113   

Financial Accounting

3 Hours

Introduction to financial accounting. Examines the nature of accounting, basic accounting concepts, financial statements, accrual basis of accounting, the accounting cycle, monetary assets, inventories, fixed assets, current and nonoccurrence liabilities, and owner’s equity.

 

ACC 2123  

Managerial Accounting

3 Hours

Introduction to managerial accounting. Examines the nature to cost-volume-profit analysis and product costing; budgets and standard costs in planning, control and performance measurements; and employs relevant costs and present value techniques in decision making. Prerequisite of ACC 2113, however, it may taken simultaneously with ACC 2113 with consent of instructor.

 

ACC 2203  

Intermediate Accounting I

3 Hours

The study of financial accounting theory and practice relating to monetary assets, inventories, plant assets, intangible assets, current liabilities, contingencies, and stockholders’ equity. Present value applications, and preparation of financial statements are examined. Coverage of: the environment of financial accounting, the development of accounting standards, and the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting.  Prerequisite: ACC 2123.

 

ACC 2213  

Intermediate Accounting II

3 Hours

The study of financial accounting theory and practice relating to the following topics: long-term liabilities, dilutive securities, earning per share, investments, revenue recognition, accounting for income taxes, pension costs, leases, accounting changes, errors, and the preparation of cash flow statements. Prerequisite: ACC 2203 with a “C” or better.

 

ACC 3113  

Financial Statement Analysis

3 Hours

Financial statement analysis and interpretation from the managers’, investors’ and creditors’ perspective. Principles of marketing, underwriting, rate making and loss adjusting. Prerequisite: FIN 3113.

                 

ACC 3213  

Management and Cost Accounting

3 Hours

Study of managerial accounting concepts in planning, control, and decision making. Emphasis on product costing methods. Cost drivers, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgets, standard costs, just-in-time implications, relevant costs and capital budgeting decisions. Prerequisite: ACC 2123.

 

ACC 3313

Auditing

3 Hours

The CPA profession, including professional ethics and legal liability; professional auditing standards; evidence; internal control; audit programs and procedures; audit reporting; introduction to operational auditing. Prerequisite: ACC 2123.

 

ACC 3913

Principles of Fraud Examination

3 Hours

The course will cover all of the major methods employees use to commit occupational fraud. Students will learn how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved. Prerequisite: ACC 3313

 

ACC 4213

(Federal) Income Tax Accounting

3 Hours

Provides an understanding of basic income tax laws applicable to individuals and sole proprietorships. Subjects covered include personal exemption, gross income, business expenses, non-business deductions, capital gains, and losses. Emphasis is on problems commonly encountered in the preparation of income and tax returns. Prerequisite: ACC 2123.

 

ACC 4313

Fund Accounting (Accounting for Non-Profit Entities)

3 Hours

Examination of accounting and financial reporting principles for nonprofit entities including state and local governmental units, colleges, hospitals, and other nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: ACC 2123.

 

 

ACC 4413

Advanced Accounting

3 Hours

Specific emphasis on business combinations and consolidated financial statements. Other topics include partnership accounting, international operations, branch accounting, segment reporting and interim statements. Prerequisite: ACC 2213.

 

ACC 4513

Advanced Managerial Accounting

3 Hours

A study of advanced decision models for managerial planning and control. Topics covered include cost behavior and regression analysis, transfer pricing, operations research techniques, accounting systems and internal control. Behavioral and ethical concepts in management accounting are examined. Prerequisite: ACC 2213.

 

ACC 4613  

International Accounting

3 Hours

Examines the nature of accounting theory and how it applies to the following basic accounting concepts, financial statements, accrual basis of accounting, the accounting cycle, monetary assets, inventories, fixed assets, current and non-current liabilities, and owner's equity. Prerequisite: ACC 2123

 

ACC 4713

Advanced Tax

3 Hours

Study of concepts and issues associated with corporate, partnerships, estate and gift taxation. Prerequisite: ACC 4213.

 

ACC 4813

Advanced Auditing

3 Hours

In-depth analysis of selected advanced topics in auditing, including professional auditing standards, planning, evidence, internal control, statistical sampling, reporting, integrative audit case, operational auditing. Prerequisite: ACC 3313.

 

ACC 4996

Professional Practice Internship in Accounting

6 Hours

Professional experience in a business environment for qualified students. Senior classification with a cumulative GPA of 2.40 or above.

 


24.2. AES - AESTHETICS

The Creativity and Social Influences series of classes (AES 2003, AES 2013, and AES 2023) constitute an exploration and discussion of the ways in which society influences how we think about, feel toward, and perceive beauty and creativity, as reflected through the arts. These classes are not designed to turn students into artists. By definition, all artists are creative--but because creativity is as human as opposable thumbs, not all creative persons are artistic. Instead, these classes provide a way to explore the student's own creativity by encouraging the regular practice of this important process in development as an educated person.

 

AES 2003

Aesthetics

3 Hours

The Creativity and Social Influences classes' primary purpose is to explore the social influences on students' attitudes and beliefs about the nature of creativity and lead students individually to rediscover the spirit of art within themselves through a series of guided creativity exercises. The secondary purpose is for students to learn basic information about the arts--what they are, why they are important, and how they intersect with daily life. Arts covered in this class include painting, sculpture, architecture, and photography. Each student will develop a personal philosophy of creativity based on his or her experiences in this course. BACONE CORE

 

AES 2013

Creativity: Improvisation

3 Hours

This course teaches students the fundamental process of one specific style of acting called Improvisation. Additionally, students will explore the social influences on their attitudes and beliefs about the nature of creativity and lead them individually to rediscover the spirit of art within themselves through a series of guided creativity exercises. All students will take part in a public performance of "Survivor: Whose Line Is It Anyway?" at the end of the semester. Each student will also develop a personal philosophy of creativity based on her or his experiences in this course. BACONE CORE

 

AES 2023

Creativity: Treasuring the Performing Arts

3 Hours

The Creativity and Social Influences classes' primary purpose is to explore the social influences on students' attitudes and beliefs about the nature of creativity and lead students individually to rediscover the spirit of art within themselves through a series of guided creativity exercises. The secondary purpose is for students to learn basic information about the arts--what they are, why they are important, and how they intersect with daily life. Arts covered in this class include music, dance, theatre, and film. Each student will develop a personal philosophy of creativity based on his or her experiences in this course. BACONE CORE

 

AES 2033

Humanities Through the Arts

3 Hours

This course explores the humanities with an emphasis upon the arts as an expression of cultural and personal values, examining the relationship of the humanities to important human values, objects and events. Students will begin by learning basic information about the arts--what they are, why they are important, how value is determined, and how they intersect with modern life. The course then takes a wide-ranging look at painting, sculpture, architecture, and photography. In addition to developing critical thinking skills related to subject matter and content, it helps students learn how to actively engage a work of art.  BACONE CORE


24.3. AIS - AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES

Some 3-hour courses with an AIS prefix, so designated for any specific academic year, will satisfy the core curriculum requirement in American Indian Studies. In the case of cross-listed courses, students must register under the AIS prefix to receive AIS credit. Cross-listed course numbers, if applicable, are indicated at the end of each description.

 

AIS 1001-1011

Survey of American Indian Affairs I and II

1 Hour

Through individual research and class discussion, students in this course will develop an understanding of the problems of the American Indian in contemporary society.   

                                   

AIS 1103

Introduction to American Indian Studies

3 Hours

Presented from a thematic, multidisciplinary perspective, this course is an introduction to the history, culture, language, literature, arts, politics, and legal status of the indigenous peoples of North America comprised of readings, lectures, discussions, films, and writing assignments. BACONE CORE

 

AIS 1133

Elementary Cherokee I

3 Hours

Elementary Cherokee is a basic language course that introduces students to Cherokee phonology, morphology, and syntax with attention given to the syllabary as well as the spoken language. Elementary Cherokee I acquaints students with basic vocabulary, common phrases, and modern idioms. The course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty.   CROSS-LISTED AS CHE 1113

 

 

AIS 1159

Tribal Languages I

12 Hours

Tribal Language I is a basic language course which introduces students to phonology, morphology, and syntax with attention to the spoken language. This course acquaints the student with basic vocabulary, common phrases, and modern idioms. The subject language is chosen and offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 1213

Survey of American Indian Arts and Crafts

3 Hours

Students will be able to identify American Indian arts and crafts styles from different regions of the country and understand how they have changed over time. Students will learn basic elements of bead work styles, feather work, basketry, and contemporary multimedia art work. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 1413

American Indian Art I

3 Hours

Acquaints the student with the process of painting American Indian subject matter in the flat, two-dimensional style known as Traditional Plains Painting, with emphasis on works by artists of the Bacone School. Students are encouraged to paint their own tribal customs and dress, stressing authenticity and research. Non-Indian students will choose a tribe, area, or ceremonial, do thorough research, and develop paintings from that research.  Independent study and individual expression will be expected. By permission of instructor only. Class 3 hours and studio. CROSS-LISTED AS ART 1413.

 

AIS 1423

American Indian Art II

3 Hours

In this continuation of AIS/ART 1423, the student concentrates on multi-figure composition in water media in the two-dimensional style known as Traditional Indian Painting with particular emphasis on artists of the Bacone School. Prerequisite: AIS or ART 1413. Class 3 hours and studio. CROSS-LISTED AS ART 1423.

 

AIS 2003

American Indian Government

3 Hours

Through a comparative study of American Indian tribal government styles in North America, students will learn the history of tribal government, its forced reorganization under the United States government, and current tribal government structure and theory.

 

AIS 2023

American Indian Mythology

3 Hours

Students in this course will explore the fascinating world of American Indian mythologies. The Subject will go into basic mythologies throughout the world. Students will become familiar with an assortment of American Indian belief systems and what it means to live as a Native America. And will review the various views of Native mythologies like origins, creations, love, heroes and war, and animals, tricksters and the end of the world. The course will enhance a better understanding of Native American philosophies and the relationships with man and his environment around him. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2033

Tribal Studies I

3 Hours

This course will focus on a comprehensive study of a particular tribal culture, including its history, life ways, and culture. Tribal content will be determined by student interest and offered depending on availability of faculty. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2112

American Indian Wellness

2 Hour

An introductory look at the topic of wellness from an American Indian perspective. Particular time and attention will be given to the incorporation of wellness techniques and lifestyle changes that will bring a more balanced and holistic way of life for Bacone College students. The course will explore wellness from many different tribal perspectives and traditions, but will lean heavily upon the Southeastern tribal ways. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2113

American Indian Tribal Government

3 Hour

This course will examine the roles of tribal governments in the formation of internal and external policies affecting the lives of American Indian people, the basis for their political power as it exists historically and how it exists in contemporary society, and government structures and functions.  In particular, the course will focus on the cultural and legal dilemmas posed by tribal governments in contemporary society; how tribal governments have maintained cultural legitimacy in the face of colonial cultural imposition; how tribal governments have articulated and retained their rights in a system of shared sovereignty; and the problems American Indians faced in building stronger political systems as they struggled to maintain and retain tribal sovereignty.

 

 

AIS 2123

American Indian History I

3 Hour

This course offers an introduction to the history of American Indian societies from the late 18th century to the beginning of the 21st century.  It will focus on the major issues and events that defined and shaped Indian peoples’ lives pursuant to the fledgling U.S. government’s liberation from Britain.  The course will explore the dynamics of Indian-European encounters, the impact of Euro-American expansion, the process of removal and the programs to “Americanize” Indian peoples.  Throughout the course, we will examine how Indians struggled to retain a sense of their historic cultures and political autonomy, even as they confronted and adapted to the powerful forces unleashed by Euro-American society.

 

AIS 2133

Comparative American Indian Cultures

3 Hour

This online course examines American Indian tribal cultures at the time of European contact. These include economics, customs, and socio-political structures as demonstrated by a variety of tribes from across the continent. Students will also learn how these forms have evolved over time. AIS 1103 PREREQUISITE – NOT BACONE CORE

 

AIS 2159

Tribal Languages II

12 Hours

This course is a continuation of Tribal Languages I. This course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1153. 

 

AIS 2313

American Indian Art III

3 Hours

This continuation of AIS/ART 1423 focuses on two-dimensional, multi-figure composition in American Indian settings with special emphasis on American Indian symbols and landscape composition in tempera, oil, and acrylic media. Prerequisite: AIS or ART 1423. Class 3 hours and studio.

 

 

 

.

AIS 2323

American Indian Art IV

3 Hours

This final course in the American Indian Art sequence concentrates on advanced details of Traditional Indian Painting. Students will plan, research, and execute works of art which best demonstrate their skills in this demanding style. Studio course. Prerequisite AIS 2313.

 

AIS 2333

American Indian Literature

3 Hour

American Indian Literature examines various representative works produced by modern American Indian writers. Readings include poetry, essays, biography, and novels. CROSS-LISTED AS LIT 2333 (LIBERAL ARTS GUIDED ELECTIVE) PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2401

American Indian Dance and Song

1 Hour

Students learn to understand and appreciate two indigenous art forms. In addition to performing dances and songs in public performances on behalf of the college, the class covers the historical significance of tribal contact with other people and its effects on tribal dress, dance, and song. Students also begin to understand the complexity of "what it means to be an Indian" in a diverse, contemporary world. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

 

AIS 2423

Multimedia, Design, and Research

3 Hours

We will look at historical and current portrayals of American Indians in media, including print, film, television and popular culture, and examine how these portrayals have modeled beliefs about and attitudes toward American Indians. In addition, we will use technologies to create multimedia projects, including personal blogs and wikis, digital projects and short films. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2431-3

Special Studies in American Indian Studies

3 Hours

Opportunity for the student to explore more deeply into an area of specific interest and develop capabilities for clarity of statement, investigation, and creative, critical attitude. Areas of study vary from semester to semester depending on student interest. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2513

American Indian Philosophy and Religion

3 Hours

This class examines American Indian world views-different ways of looking at the world and how human cultures explain their relationship with the natural world as a source of spirituality. It will also cover how American Indian beliefs have changed in response to historical circumstances and examine spiritual beliefs in contemporary Indian communities. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2553

Foundations in American Indian Ministry

3 Hours

 

Bacone College was founded to train Christian leaders to serve as preachers and public school teachers among native tribes.  In partial fulfillment of that original goal and purpose, this course will introduce the student to the unique features of ministry in the context of American Indian life and culture.  While each native ministry must be adapted to the customs, beliefs, and language of the specific tribe in which it takes place, this course will introduce the student to the foundational principles of native ministry. Special attention will be given to the practices of contextualization, redemptive analogy, and incarnational ministry as they are utilized in native ministry.  Students will research and become acquainted with current models of ministries that are serving native persons in various places (Prerequisites: MIN Introduction of Christian Ministry and MIN Principles of Biblical Research and Writing)

 

AIS 2613

Addictions in Indian Country

3 Hours

This online course will provide students with accurate information about current and past addictions that American Indians face. Students will learn the different types of addictions that create abuses and other complications in Indian Country. This course will not only discuss alcohol and drug abuse, but expand to addictions that include gambling, eating disorders, and more. The course will discuss the current theories that address "best practices" within the field of addiction. Students will broaden their understanding of American Indian addictions by exploring the historical, political, social justice and other issues associated with successful and unsuccessful approaches to the addictions in Indian Country. AIS 1103 PREREQUISITE – NOT BACONE CORE 

 

AIS 2723

Applied Linguistics for Tribal Languages

3 Hours

This course provides an introduction to the intersection of linguistic research and language revitalization for tribal communities.  It examines the distinction between preservation and revitalization of tribal languages with a focus on how linguistic research can effectively be applied to language learning and teaching.  Emphasis is placed on students learning to use linguistic resources to successfully advance their own language learning or teaching goals. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2733

Curriculum Development for Tribal Languages

3 Hours

This course examines various curriculum models used in immersion teaching and learning for tribal languages and provides students with an opportunity to plan, develop, assess, and utilize instructional materials they develop in an immersion setting.  Emphasis is given to the examination, preparation, integration, and application of appropriate models within specific instructional environments matched to student’s needs, interests, and abilities. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

 

AIS 2743

Teaching Methods for Tribal Languages

3 Hours

This course provides an overview of proven models and best practices for teaching tribal languages. The course will focus on the foundational methods and principles of immersion teaching approaches and language acquisition based on communicative needs; specifically, the course will examine effective application of methods to specific teaching environments for tribal languages. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2913

Contemporary American Indian Affairs

3 Hours

This course surveys the social, political, and religious landscape of the Indian people of North America. After a short historical examination of some of the issues that still affect Indian people today, it looks at the history of treaties, allotment, military actions, boarding schools, and a history of efforts to Christianize the Indian people. It further examines the Indian Reorganization Act and its impact on contemporary tribal government, and ends with contemporary events such as the 1969 occupation of Alcatraz, the 1973 takeover at Wounded Knee, the 1975 Oglala shootout, and the Individual Indian Money lawsuit. PREREQUISITE; AIS 1103

 

AIS 2916

Tribal Language Internship I

12 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide intensive language study and entry-level professional experience in a tribal language program setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at a faculty-approved site for a minimum of 480 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals and current level of ability. Internships may include classroom teaching experience, assisting with administration of a tribal language program, or other professional experience related to language program development and management.  Only sites that can provide a minimum of ten hours a week of intensive language learning for the student are eligible to serve as internship sites. Other site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 2926

Tribal Language Internship II

12 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide intensive language study and entry-level professional experience in a tribal language program setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at a faculty-approved site for a minimum of 480 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals and current level of ability. It is strongly recommended that students complete their Tribal Language Internship 2 at the same site that they interned for Tribal Language Internship 1; however, exceptions will be allowed on a case-by-case basis.  Internships may include classroom teaching experience, assisting with administration of a tribal language program, or other professional experience related to language program development and management.  Only sites that can provide a minimum of ten hours a week of intensive language learning for the student are eligible to serve as internship sites. Other site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103, AIS 2916 Tribal Language Internship I

 

AIS 3003

Environmental Issues in Indian Country

3 Hours

This course will deal with contemporary issues with regard to control of environmental resources in Indian reservations and communities, including water quality and distribution, land management, toxic waste cleanup, and wetlands management. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3013

American Indian History I

3 Hours

The dynamics of Indian-European encounters beginning in the early sixteenth century, the impact of Euro-American expansion and the displacement of Indians, Indian resistance, the creation of "Indian Territory" and ultimate removal of Indian tribes west of the Mississippi river. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103 CROSS-LISTED WITH HIS 3013

 

AIS 3023

Oklahoma History

3 Hours

The American frontier in 1840, Indian resistance to American expansion, Indians in the Civil War, railroads and allotment of Indian land, Indians in World War I and II, resurgence of Indian identity and sovereignty in the 20th century. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103 CROSS-LISTED HIS 3113

 

AIS 3033

Tribal Studies II

3 Hours

Continuation of Tribal Studies I. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103 AND AIS 2033

 

 

AIS 3103

American Indian Political Experience

3 Hours

This course examines the development of the political and policy relationship between American Indian nations and the United States government using political, social, economic, and cultural context. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3113

American Indian Cultural Preservation and Museum Science

3 Hours

This course is an introduction to current developments in tribal and non-tribal museums, with special attention to ideology of display and politics of repatriation. The course will address the needs of tribal cultural archives consisting of records, photographs, oral histories, maps, recordings, and physical artifacts. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3123

American Indian Health Management and Services

3 Hours

This course addresses health care systems, policy, and health conditions unique to American Indians. The course examines the historical information about American Indians with emphasis on health, including behavioral health and tribal/Indian health service policy issues. Discussions include traditional medicine and healing, research needs related to American Indian health, and career opportunities in health management and services. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3133

Tribal Economic Development/Tribal Management

3 Hours

This course introduces students to the concepts of tribal economic development and the various issues facing tribal and federal governments. Theories and roles of tribal economic development as it relates to the survival and continuation of tribal governments. Included in this course is the social and political context of American Indian tribal gaming, political relationships between federal and tribal governments, contemporary examples of tribal gaming, sociocultural and economic forces leading to gamin as strategy for economic development, and/or support from Indian and non-Indian communities to tribal gaming. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 3153

Tribal Languages III

3 Hours

This course is a continuation of Tribal Languages II. It will consist of conversational practice, vocabulary-building, history, and culture of the tribe. This course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103 AND AIS 3033

 

AIS 3159

Tribal Language III Internship

12 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide intensive language study and entry-level professional experience in a tribal language program setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at a faculty-approved site for a minimum of 480 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals and current level of ability. It is strongly recommended that students complete their Tribal Language Internship 3 at the same site that they interned for Tribal Language Internship 2; however, exceptions will be allowed on a case-by-case basis.  Internships may include classroom teaching experience, assisting with administration of a tribal language program, or other professional experience related to language program development and management.  Only sites that can provide a minimum of ten hours a week of intensive language learning for the student are eligible to serve as internship sites. Other site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected.  PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the Center for Tribal Languages to enroll.  

 

AIS 3203

Indigenous Leadership Principles

3 Hours

This course examines the development of leadership within individuals and explores the influence of leaders within Indigenous Leadership roles.  The course will pay special attention to the role of mid-levels managers in tribal organizations and their ability to work both up, down, and across organizational tribal structures. The challenges of balancing the needs of supervisors, subordinates, colleagues, and citizens will be addressed along with case studies exploring how Indigenous leaders successfully handled challenges and crisis, using Indigenous Leadership models.

 

AIS 3213

Federal Indian Policy

3 Hours

This course presents an overview of major legal principles of federal Indian law, major developments in federal Indian policy, and how they have affected the education of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Three fundamental legal principles of federal Indian law are presented: tribes are independent sovereign governments, separate from the states and the federal government; tribal sovereignty generally extends over a federally recognized geographic territory and over the activities and conduct of tribal and nontribal members within that territory; and tribal sovereignty is inherent and exists unless and until Congress takes it away. Court case examples illustrating these principles are given. Since questions about tribal sovereignty are often viewed as questions of the intent of Congress, acts of Congress concerning treaties, statutes, and public laws are reviewed, along with court case examples. A history of federal Indian education laws and policies traces tribal control from pre-contact through Federal control, state control, and finally to the return toward tribal control.

AIS 3233

American Indian Sovereignty

3 Hours

This course will introduce and consider the concept of sovereignty involving the relationship of tribal people to federal and state governments through historical development of treaties, congressional acts, and court decisions. It will also explore the ways in which Federal Indian law and policy have been significantly influenced through many broad swings in public ideology.

 

`AIS 3243

American Indian Women

3 Hours

This course will examine the historical experience of Native American women with respect to their cultures.  This class pursues ethno history using the cultural framework of Native Communities to interpret the historical record.  Over the course of the semester we will examine gender and gender roles in Native American culture, Indian women in the social structure, historical and contemporary roles, problems and opportunities of contemporary women, the feminist movement and Indian rights, as well as the contributions of Individual native women.   

AIS 4003

Issues in American Indian Education

3 Hours

This course studies the history of Indian education policy and practice in the United States focusing on traditional tribal methods as well as contemporary, federal, state, and tribal programs. Discussions will include cross-cultural differences in learning styles, emphasis on American Indian styles. Other cross-cultural differences will be explored such as socialization needs related to readiness for school. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 4009

Internship

9 Hours

Individualized supervised internship in an appropriate agency, organization, services , or business related to professionalize working with American Indian tribal communities. Involves providing reports for cooperating tribe or agency. PREREQUISITE: AIS 1103

 

AIS 4013

Internship

3 Hours

The Department of American Indian Studies offers students the ability to experience real life experiential learning through its Internship course.  Internship allows American Indian Studies (AIS) majors and minors to build real-life work experience while applying AIS knowledge in the workforce. AIS Internship allows students to build valuable work experience while getting the chance to work on Native causes with Native people. This course may be used as a capstone course in American Indian Studies. Students will utilize research methods and theory to conduct their own research culminating in a research paper. Professional development aimed to prepare students for graduate studies and careers may also be covered.

 

 

AIS 4159

TRIBAL Language IV Internship

12 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide intensive language study and entry-level professional experience in a tribal language program setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at a faculty-approved site for a minimum of 480 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals and current level of ability. It is strongly recommended that students complete their Tribal Language Internship 4 at the same site that they interned for Tribal Language Internship 3; however, exceptions will be allowed on a case-by-case basis.  Internships may include classroom teaching experience, assisting with administration of a tribal language program, or other professional experience related to language program development and management.  Only sites that can provide a minimum of ten hours a week of intensive language learning for the student are eligible to serve as internship sites. Other site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the Center for Tribal Languages to enroll.

 

AIS 4203

Senior Seminar

3 Hour

This course is the capstone course in American Indian Studies.  Students will utilize research methods and theory to conduct their own research culminating in a research paper.  Professional development aimed to prepare students for graduate studies and careers will also be covered. 

 


24.4. ART

A condition of enrollment in any studio course in ART is agreement by the student that the department may select and retain for the permanent collection of Bacone College up to three examples or specimens of the student’s work in the course. For studio courses, the department requires three hours of work each week for each hour in addition to time spent in class. A three-hour course requires a commitment of six to nine in-studio hours each week. Fees: Studio courses require a materials fee. Students are expected to purchase their personal art supplies for all studio courses.

All classes beginning with an ART prefix which have no prerequisites will fulfill the Guided Liberal Arts Electives graduation requirement. Classes which cross-list with AIS must be taken with an ART prefix.

 

ART 1003

Art Fundamentals

3 Hours

An introductory course in the visual arts, presenting fundamentals in the experience of the exploration of the elements of art. Students will be introduced to art history and the language of art, providing essential elements and the rich and varied history of their uses.  The student will learn the language of art and be able to discuss their own art and examples from videos, tests, etc. in correct terminology and learn to interact with the formal elements and principles of art by working various exercises that illustrate fundamental principles of line, shape, color and texture.

 

ART 1013

Native American Art History I

3 Hours

This course is an overview of the styles and purposes of art from Prehistory through the Renaissance. While primarily focusing on artistic achievements, we will also examine the social, political, economic, and religious events that have shaped the art and history of society.  Course material will focus on major cultural and stylistic divisions by examining painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts.

 

ART 1113

American Indian Arts & Crafts I

3 Hours

An introduction to American Indian handicraft.  Authentic Indian methods are emphasized through the study and use of materials such as leather, cloth, wood, metal, and beads in design and embroidery. Studio course. 

 

 

ART 1123

American Indian Arts & Crafts II

3 Hours

Advanced research and methodology in American Indian Arts and Crafts. Prerequisite: AIS 1113 or ART 1113. Studio course. 

 

ART 1213

Drawing I 

3 Hours

Students learn to identify the purpose and effects of basic materials used for drawing, then study elementary concepts of pictorial organization. They learn and practice basic rendering techniques used with colored pencils, charcoal, graphite, and ink. Each student will keep all drawings done during the semester in a sketch book or portfolio. Studio course. In some semesters, this course may be listed as ART 2003.

 

ART 1223

Drawing II

3 Hours

In this continuation of ART 1213, the student begins to find his/her own direction, demonstrating individual expression in composition, subject matter, and drawing techniques. Each student will keep all drawings done during the semester in a sketchbook or portfolio; these should reflect growing complexity and detail. Prerequisite: ART 1213. Studio course.

 

ART 1323

Acrylic Painting I

3 Hours

Students learn to identify the purpose and effects of basic materials used for acrylic painting, then study elementary concepts of pictorial organization. They learn and practice basic acrylic rendering techniques, working in the primary colors only. Course encourages students to demonstrate individualized expression.  Each student will keep all paintings done during the semester in a portfolio. Studio course. In some semesters, this course may be listed as ART 2013.

 

ART 1333

Acrylic Painting II

3 Hours

In this continuation of ART 1323, the student begins to find his/her own direction, demonstrating individual expression in composition, subject matter, and paint quality and techniques. Students will work on larger size canvas or panel support. Each student will keep all paintings done during the semester in a portfolio; these should reflect growing complexity and detail. Prerequisite: ART 1333. Studio course.

 

ART 1413

American Indian Art I

3 Hours

Acquaints the student with the process of painting American Indian subject matter in the flat, two-dimensional style known as Traditional Plains Painting, with emphasis on works by artists of the Bacone School. Students are encouraged to paint their own tribal customs and dress, stressing authenticity and research. Non-Indian students will choose a tribe, area, or ceremonial, do thorough research, and develop paintings from that research.  Independent study and individual expression will be expected. By permission of instructor only. Class 3 hours and studio. CROSS-LISTED AS AIS 1413.

 

ART 1423

American Indian Art II

3 Hours

In this continuation of AIS/ART 1423, the student concentrates on multi-figure composition in water media in the two-dimensional style known as Traditional Indian Painting with particular emphasis on artists of the Bacone School. Prerequisite: AIS or ART 1413. Class 3 hours and studio. CROSS-LISTED AS AIS 1423.

 

ART 1713

Sculpture

3 Hours

Students learn the fundamental techniques of creating three-dimensional art. Materials used may include wood, steel, fabric, plastics, or others of instructor’s choice, and will vary from semester to semester. Students may gain experience in the use of oxygen, acetylene torches, knives, and a wood lathe. Proper safety precautions are required at all times. Studio course. In some semesters, this course may be listed as ART 2113.

 

ART 2013

Art History Survey II

3 Hours

This course is an overview of the styles and purposes of art from Mannerism through the present. While primarily focusing on artistic achievements, we will also examine the social, political, economic, and religious events that have shaped the art and history of society. Course material will focus on major cultural and stylistic divisions by examining painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts.

 

ART 2023

Introduction to Printmaking

3 Hours

 Printmaking I is a course that will instruct the art student in a variety of printmaking processes; stenciling, block printing, serigraphy, and dry point etching.  The printmaking I course will give the student a greater understanding of printmaking, theory and practice.

 

ART 2113

Figure Drawing I

3 Hours

Students learn tone values, anatomy, quick sketching, and portrait work by drawing from a live model. Course covers instruction in techniques of surface rendering by blocking-out and cross-hatching. All drawings from the semester are to be collected in a portfolio or sketchbook. Studio course. Prerequisite: ART 1213/2003 highly recommended unless student can satisfactorily demonstrate basic techniques of charcoal, graphite, and ink to instructor.

 

ART 2123

Serigraphy

3 Hours

Students learn the technical process of the fine art of silkscreen printing through directed.

 

ART 2213

Figure Drawing II

3 Hours

In this continuation of ART 2113, students add color theory to their understanding of portrait-figure rendering. Live models used. All work is collected in a portfolio or sketchbook during the semester. Drawings should indicate a growth in technique and sophistication of rendering. Studio course.

 

ART 2431-2433

Special Studies in Art

1-3 Hours

The student, in cooperation with an instructor, develops an advanced technique and/or analysis a selected topic or media in art. May be repeated with a different topic. Conferences and studio, if warranted.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 

 


24.5. BIO - BIOLOGY

 

BIO 1114

Human Biology

4 Hours

An introductory course covering main principles of human life with emphasis on structure, function and homeostasis. The topics covered include chemistry of life, cell structure and function, organ systems, immune functions, infectious diseases and genetics. Students with an ACT sub-score in science of 24 or higher are exempt from having to take this course as a prerequisite but must still fulfill the core curriculum requirement of four credit hour lab science. This course includes both lecture and laboratory. No Prerequisite. BACONE CORE

 

BIO 1144

Concepts of Biology

4 Hours

An introductory general biology course covering various topics including basic chemistry, cellular biology, study of animals, plants, protozoans, and fungi, human biology, genetics, heredity, and environmental- population studies. This course includes both lecture and laboratory. No prerequisites.

 

BIO 2123

Nutrition

3 Hours

This is an introductory course dealing with a focus on understanding of the fundamentals of nutrition and how these fundamentals relate to promotion and maintenance of optimal health throughout the life cycle.

 

 

BIO 2134

Anatomy and Physiology I

4 Hours

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence that offers a comprehensive study of normal human anatomy and physiology. Topics covered include anatomical terminology, basic chemistry, cytology, and histology, study of skeletal system, muscle anatomy and physiology, nervous system and general and special senses. This course includes both lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite for this course is a grade of  “C” in Human Biology or equivalent. BACONE CORE

 

BIO 2144

Anatomy and Physiology II

4 Hours

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence that offers a comprehensive study of normal human anatomy and physiology. This course builds upon the fundamentals studied in Anatomy and Physiology I by exploring the more intricate systems of the body. Topics covered include endocrine system, cardiovascular system, and digestive system with nutritional implications, respiratory and urinary systems. This course includes both lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite for this course is a grade of “C” in Anatomy and Physiology I. BACONE CORE

 

BIO 2324

Microbiology

4 Hours

This course offers basic concepts regarding microorganisms, including their classification, structure, physiology, identification, disease causing ability and methods of control. Particular emphasis is given to those microorganisms that cause human disease. This course includes both lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite is a grade of "C" in Human Biology or equivalent. BACONE CORE

 


24.6. BUS - BUSINESS

 

BUS 2113

Business Communications

3 Hours

Communications practices in business. Communication skills will be improved through solution of practical business writing problems. Prerequisite: ENG 1113.

 

BUS 2123

Business Mathematics

3 Hours

Practical application of the principles of mathematics to the various phases of business. Prerequisite: ACT Math score of 14 or equivalent.

 

BUS 2143

Business Law I

3 Hours

The law of contracts, agency, partnerships, and corporations.

 

BUS 3113

International Business

3 Hours

This course provides the knowledge of theory and practice in international business. The subject matter will help to lay the foundation for a better understanding global business. Prerequisite: MGT2223, MKT2283, and ECN 2113

 

BUS 3213

Business in Multicultural Environment

3 Hours

Business operations in multicultural environment.  Relationships between the business process and social attitudes, values, ideologies, and customs with special emphasis on Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Prerequisite:  BUS 3113.

 

BUS 3313

Entertainment, Hospitality, & Tourism

3 Hours

This course provides a rigorous investigation of private for-profit commercial recreation, event, and tourism businesses. It explores consumer leisure behavior, trends, products, and services and their implications for managers and entrepreneurs. You will learn about and apply management and marketing strategies and techniques used by some of the best commercial recreation enterprises. You will help develop a business plan for a commercial recreation, event, or tourism enterprise. You are expected to work outside the classroom to complete projects.

 

BUS 4013

Business Ethics

3 Hours

This is an applied ethics course focused on the application of moral decision making to various ethical dilemmas.  This course provides a framework of basic principles for systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior.

 

BUS 4113

Business Law II

3 Hours

The law of property, sales, secured transactions, commercial paper, trusts, wills, insurance and property. Prerequisite:  BUS2143.

 

BUS 4553

Quantitative Methods in Business

3 Hours

This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the concepts and techniques of differential and integral calculus from a practical perspective placing a primary emphasis on applying the concepts and techniques of the calculus to problems in business and economics. Prerequisite: MTH 1513

 

BUS 4954

Problems in Business

4 Hours

Integration of the decision-making processes involved in each of the major functional areas of business.  Senior capstone classification. Enrollment is restricted to senior business majors or with the consent of instructor.

 

BUS 4993-6

Business Administration Internship

3-6 Hours

The purpose of a student internship in an educational program is to test classroom concepts in a real life situation and to report on the results of the classroom/interning experience. The format is to be seen as skeletal and is usually sufficient for Internship reports. It is advisable to keep a daily/weekly log of all activities.


24.7. CHM - CHEMISTRY

 

CHM 1364

Introduction to Chemistry

4 Hours

This course explores the fundamental concepts of chemistry. Topics include measurements, the metric system, matter and energy, basic atomic structure, chemical bonding, intermolecular attractions, names and formulas of compounds. In addition, mole and molar mass calculations, chemical reactions, solutions and solution concentration calculations, and acids and bases are also covered. This course includes both lab and lecture and assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry. Although there is no math prerequisite, it is recommended that students successfully complete Introductory Algebra (MTH 0125) or an equivalent course or a higher math course, prior to taking this course. BACONE CORE

 

CHM 2364

Organic and Biological Chemistry

4 Hours

This is a one semester course that gives students fundamental knowledge of selected topics from organic and biochemistry. The organic chemistry portion of this course looks at names, structures, properties and selected reactions of alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons including aromatic, oxygen and sulfur containing compounds, amines, and carboxylic acids and their derivatives. The biochemistry part of the course investigates the structures and properties of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and the roles of these substances in living systems. Basic metabolic pathways and energy production, food and human nutrition, and specific disease states are also discussed. This course includes both lecture and lab. Prerequisite CHM 1364. BACONE CORE

 

 


24.8. MIN - CHRISTIAN MINISTRY

MIN 1021

Spiritual Formation I: Christian Identity

1 Hour

Spiritual Formation I begins by helping the student understand their identity in Christ. The goal is a deeper sense of what should define us. We ask questions like: (1) “Who am I?” (2) “How has God gifted me?” (3) “What does it mean to be in Christ?” (4) “How should that impact the way I live?” Students participate in a series of exercises for examining the concept of biblical identity. Exercises are designed to guide students in examining their lives, identifying specific areas of growth for the coming semesters and living out their faith in Christ more intentionally.  This course answers the basic question, “Who am I in Christ?”

 

MIN 1031

Spiritual Formation II: Christian Community

1 Hour

The ministry degree program at Bacone College believes that spiritual growth takes place, “In the context of biblical community.”  This course, Spiritual Formation 2, is designed to introduce the student to the concept of Christian community as it is lived out at Bacone College.  This course answers the basic question, “Who am I in the body of Christ?”

MIN 1103

Introduction to Christian Ministry

3 Hours

Designed for those who believe they are called to ministry, this course will allow students to explore the field of ministry as well as to begin the process of spiritual formation for ministry.  The course begins by giving students opportunities to analyze their individual gifts, skills and temperament and receive structured feedback from others about their sense of call. Students will be challenged to develop their own understanding of ministry and how they believe they are called to that work. As part of this discernment process, the student will develop a plan for the practice of personal spiritual disciplines.  Students will explore the ministry opportunities available to them and develop a plan for appropriate “next steps” in order to respond faithfully to their current understanding of God’s call on their lives.  

 

MIN 1123

Principles of Biblical Research and Writing

3 Hours

This course is designed to introduce the Christian Ministry major to the principles involved in this process and prepare the student to do exegetical work as required in the Christian Ministry courses.  The course focuses first on the tools of biblical exegesis then, on how to logically present the findings of exegesis through formal academic writing, using the format that is accepted as the standard in the discipline. (Prerequisites:  MIN1103 Introduction to Christian Ministry and ENG1113 Composition I, CGPA 2.0).

 

MIN 1143

New Testament Literature

3 Hours

Students study the framework of the books of the New Testament including chronology, major events, and people involved in the life of Christ, the ministry of Paul, and the book of Acts. Students will also study the formation of the New Testament canon, issues related to translation, and current methods of critical study.  This course may fulfill the core curriculum REL requirement if so designated in any given academic year.

 

MIN 1213

The Life of Christ

3 Hours

In this course the student will gain a basic understanding of the life, thoughts, theology, and significance of Jesus Christ presented primarily through the Synoptic Gospels. Some attention will be given to non-canonical sources. Jesus’ life and teachings will be placed against the background of first-century Judaism, Hellenism, and the Roman Empire. The student will also explore the relevance of Jesus’ life and theology for a contemporary audience. This course covers advanced concepts and is not recommended for the core curriculum requirement.

 

MIN 1223

Old Testament Literature

3 Hours

Students study the framework of the books of the Old Testament including chronology, major events and characters involved. Students study the Torah, the Talmud, non-canonical sources like the Dead Sea Scrolls the messianic prophecies in these books, learn about issues related to translation, and examine current methods of critical study.

 

MIN 2011

Spiritual Formation III: Word

1 Hour

The purpose of SF3 is to challenge the student to apply the Word of God to life.  Specifically, the course will introduce the student to the ancient practice of Lectio Divina (Latin for "Divine Reading"). Lectio Divina is the practice of scriptural reading, meditation and prayer intended to promote communion with God.  It does not treat Scripture as texts to be studied, but as the Living Word to be applied to the life.  Lectio Divina has four separate steps: read; meditate; pray; contemplate. First, a passage of Scripture is read, then its meaning is reflected upon. This is followed by prayer and contemplation on the Word of God.  Unlike exegetical courses in the program, this not a theological analysis of biblical passages but viewing them with Christ as the key to their meaning. For example, at the Last Supper, Jesus told his disciples, “My peace I leave with you.”   Normal practice would be to study the literary historical, and linguistic context and exegete the passage. In Lectio Divina, however, the practitioner "enters" and shares the peace of Christ rather than "dissecting" it. The focus is on application to life.  The course answers the question, “How does the Word of God speak to my life?”

 

MIN 2021

Spiritual Formation IV: Prayer

1 Hour

The purpose of Spiritual Formation IV is to take the student into one of the most challenging areas of the Christian life:  Prayer.  Prayer has been called a battleground for every believer.  The Christian leader must have a meaningful prayer life if she/he hopes to lead people to know Christ.  Prayer is a key for developing personal mastery in leadership.   Exercises are designed to guide students in examining their prayer lives, acquainting them with various forms and styles of prayer and helping them develop an experience that is meaningful for the.   Students will participate in a one-day prayer vigil with the members of their group and the other CM majors to experience forms of private and group prayer. This course addresses the basic question, “How do I relate to Christ?”

 

MIN 2133

Seminar in Christian Counseling

3 Hours

This course will expose the Christian leader to opportunities to develop in Christian Counseling by preparation for and participation in the annual National Christian Counselors Association Conference to be held at the Regal Sun Hotel at Walt Disney World in Orlando, FL, November 9-13, 2010. The course will consist of three parts: reading in preparation for the conference, actual attendance at the conference and a project and reflection paper following the conference. The NCCA Conference is a 3-day experience in training and counseling under the direction of nationally-known Christian counselors. The class utilizes the postmodern approach to learning by actual experience and reflection on that experience.

 

MIN 2223

The Life of Paul

3 Hours

In this course, the student will gain a basic understanding of the life and theology of the apostle Paul, as presented primarily in the book of Acts and in Paul’s New Testament letters. Some attention will be given to non-canonical sources. Paul’s theology will be primarily presented against the background of first-century Judaism, Hellenism, the Roman Empire, and the developing early Christian community. The student will also explore the relevance of Paul’s life and thought for a contemporary audience.

 

MIN 2233

Contextualized Ministry

3 Hours

This course focuses on how to develop healthy contextualized churches in multicultural environments, and is designed to equip church leaders to found contextualized ministries. Beginning with a study of the incarnational ministry of Jesus and the contextualized ministry of the Apostle Paul, the course will move into a study of various approaches to contextualized ministry as it is currently practiced in various setting. The course will feature recorded video lectures from ABC leaders who serve in various contexts.  Special attention will be given to the application of cultural contextualization though practice on campus.  Leaders from contextualized ministries will provide mentored leadership for students interested in serving in their respective areas.

 

MIN 2313

Introduction to Christian Pedagogy

3 Hours

Jesus commissioned the disciples to teach the unbeliever, baptize them, and continue to teach them. Teaching was an important part of the ministry Jesus.  The Scriptures write of Jesus, “He came teaching...”  Christian education has always been tied to the spiritual formation of the faithful and found in the center of the life of the church.  Thus, every Christian worker should in a sense be a Christian education specialist.  The rise of Busters, Generation X, and the Digital Generation calls for the 21st century Christian leader to hold a clearly defined spiritual formation strategy in this age of change and be ready to carry out that strategy. The course will take the student through the process of lesson design, lesson preparation, classroom teaching, and evaluation.

 

MIN 2433

Special Studies in Ministry

3 Hours

Provides an opportunity for the student to explore the meaning and operation of ministry and religion more deeply, and to develop capabilities for clarity of statement, investigation, and creative, critical attitude.  Areas of study vary from semester to semester.

 

MIN 2443

Foundations In Pastoral Counseling

3 Hours

This course will introduce the Christian leader to the biblical, psychological, and clinical foundations of Christian counseling. There is a strong practicum component to this course which serves an introduction to pastoral counseling. It does not involve extensive education in psychological theory or close supervision of actual counseling. The course will acquaint the student with the basic counseling situations found in a ministry setting and serve as a foundation for further study.

 

 

MIN 2533

Christian Ministry Internship I

3 Hours

The purpose of a student internship in an educational program is to test classroom concepts in a real life situation and to report on the results of the classroom/interning experience. The format is to be seen as skeletal and is usually sufficient for Internship reports. It is advisable to keep a daily/weekly log of all activities.

 

 

MIN 2543

Christian Ministry Internship II

3 Hours

The purpose of a student internship in an educational program is to test classroom concepts in a real life situation and to report on the results of the classroom/interning experience. The format is to be seen as skeletal and is usually sufficient for Internship reports. It is advisable to keep a daily/weekly log of all activities. Due dates for the project proposal are listed below in the course schedule.

 

MIN 2553

Foundations in American Indian Ministry

3 Hours

Bacone College was founded to train Christian leaders to serve as preachers and public school teachers among native tribes.  In partial fulfillment of that original goal and purpose, this course will introduce the student to the unique features of ministry in the context of American Indian life and culture.  While each native ministry must be adapted to the customs, beliefs, and language of the specific tribe in which it takes place, this course will introduce the student to the foundational principles of native ministry. Special attention will be given to the practices of contextualization, redemptive analogy, and incarnational ministry as they are utilized in native ministry.  Students will research and become acquainted with current models of ministries that are serving native persons in various places (Prerequisites: MIN Introduction of Christian Ministry and MIN Principles of Biblical Research and Writing)

 

MIN 3021

Spiritual Formation IV: Relationships

1 Hour

It has been said that after accepting Christ as Saviour, the biggest decision in life is choosing a spouse.   This is doubly true for those who serve in ministry.  Ronnie Floyd of Pastors.com writes: 

”Perhaps the most important decision a pastor makes in his/her  life and ministry is choosing the person who will become his/her mate. Through my years of pastoring and leading churches, I have always found that a pastor and their ministry will not surpass his marital relationship in terms of healthy growth. If the marriage is healthy, the ministry has a much greater probability of being productive and effective.

This course is designed to help the student think about the process of choosing a mate as someone who will be in ministry.

 

MIN 3023

Studies of the Gospel: Mark

3 Hours

An in depth study of the various interpretations and slight variations in the books of the Gospel.

 

MIN 3031

Spiritual Formation V: Vocation

1 Hour

In the first year of the program, students write a final paper on the kind of ministry they think they are called to. By the third year of the program, students should begin to refine this understanding of their calling and focus on the ministry they now believe they are called to perform.  This may or may not be the same understanding that they had at the beginning.  This course is designed to help the student research his area of ministry and the steps necessary to move towards that goal.

.   

MIN 3033

Studies of the Gospel: Matthew

3 Hours

An in depth study of the various interpretations and slight variations in the books of the Gospel.

 

MIN 3043

Studies of the Gospel: Luke

3 Hours

An in depth study of the various interpretations and slight variations in the books of the Gospel.

 

MIN 3123

Postmodern Christianity

3 Hours

Introduction to understanding Christianity utilizing a postmodern philosophical approach.

 

MIN 3213

Studies of the Gospel: John

3 Hours

An in depth study of the various interpretations and slight variations in the books of the Gospel.

 

MIN 3223

Technology in the Ministry

3 Hours

An introduction to utilizing technology to promote or enhance the ministry of the Church.

 

 

MIN 3233

Christian Missions

3 Hours

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of mission work and engagement in active participation in the outreach ministry of the church organizations.

 

MIN 3243

History of Christianity

3 Hours

An overview of the basic fundamentals from the early church to the information to present day.

 

MIN 3313

Homiletics

3 Hours

Homiletics is an upper division class devoted to the study of Christian Preaching and a brief survey of some modern and postmodern preaching styles. We will begin with a short study of the origin of Preaching and its progression into the modern and postmodern eras. Emphasis will be given on an EPIC (Experiential, Participatory, Image-rich, and Connected) style. We will attempt to survey a number of contemporary issues within the framework of Christian Preaching. RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITE: JUNIOR STANDING and REL 1003 or 1013.

 

MIN 3323

Native American Homiletics

3 Hours

In partial fulfillment of Bacone’s original goal and purpose to train native leaders, this course will introduce the student to the unique features of preaching by American Indians. The course will focus on historical examples of Native American Christian sermons, as well as examples of developing Native American hermeneutics and narrative preaching.  Special attention will be given to narrative preaching as an effective form of sermon delivery in an indigenous context.  (Pre-requisites: MIN3313 Homiletics, MIN 2553 Foundations in American Indian Ministry or concurrent)

 

MIN 3333

Native American Hermeneutics

3 Hours

In partial fulfillment of Bacone’s original goal and purpose to train Native leaders, this course will introduce the student to the various approaches to biblical interpretation by American Indians. The course will focus on biblical hermeneutics that appreciate the diversity of indigenous worldviews, as well as examples of developing Native American hermeneutics.  Special attention will be given to specific passages that have been important to Native peoples’ understanding of holy scripture.

 

MIN 3413

Crisis Counseling In Ministry

3 Hours

Much of the counseling done in ministry is crisis counseling. There are two basic types of crises: development and situational. Developmental crises are the natural results of the life cycle. Situational crises can be the result of the loss of a job, an incapacitating illness, the death of a friend, child, or spouse, ones' own impending death, a rape or incest, the adoption of a child, the discovery of marital infidelity, or any number of other causes. This course is designed to provide the student with an approach to counseling that responds to these situational crisis situations. The course will focus upon a two-fold approach: (1) reducing the impact of the crisis-precipitating event and (2) helping counselees adjust to the changes that result from the crisis. The nature of crises in human experience will be surveyed. Effective counseling responses rooted in counseling theory and technique, theology, pastoral care, and Scripture will be analyzed. Students will develop a crisis counseling approach which is informed about crisis in human life and the Church.

 

MIN 3433

Christian Ministry Internship III

3 Hours

The purpose of a student internship in an educational program is to test classroom concepts in a real life situation and to report on the results of the classroom/interning experience. The format is to be seen as skeletal and is usually sufficient for Internship reports. It is advisable to keep a daily/weekly log of all activities. Due dates for the project proposal are listed below in the course schedule.

 

MIN 3513

Family Systems In Christian Counseling

3 Hours

The Counseling Concentration of Bacone College employs the therapeutic model of Bowen Family Systems Theory. This course will focus on understanding the eight basic concepts of Bowen Theory and how to apply them in a ministry context. Leaders will be taught strategies for maintaining a non-anxious presence, keeping themselves from being co-opted by triangles, repositioning themselves when they realize they are in triangles, and working on staying differentiated from the problems.

 

MIN 3533

Christian Ministry Internship IV

3 Hours

The purpose of a student internship in an educational program is to test classroom concepts in a real life situation and to report on the results of the classroom/interning experience. The format is to be seen as skeletal and is usually sufficient for Internship reports. It is advisable to keep a daily/weekly log of all activities. Due dates for the project proposal are listed below in the course schedule.

 

 

MIN 3563

American Baptist History and Polity

3 Hours

As such, this course seeks to survey the historical and theological roots of Baptist life, thought and practice. It also intends to provide a basic understanding of Baptist polity. More particularly, it orients students to the current life, structures and practices of the American Baptist Churches in the USA. This includes a review of the steps toward ordination and placement within the ABC/USA. The course is open to all, but is designed for the needs of American Baptist students.

 

MIN 3593 or 3596

Christian Counseling Internship

3 – 6 Hours

The Christian Counseling Internship is the practicum course for the National Christian Counselor Association certification program. All students who wish complete the certification process must complete this practicum. This course shall consist of an internship in which the student will administer the A.P.S. to 10 individuals under the direction of an assigned and approved clinical supervisor. Students will be required to administer the profiles to counselees, score them electronically, and conduct counseling sessions with these ten counselees. The instructor for the internship will serve as the counseling supervisor for the internship.  With approval of the supervisor, the course may be taken for either 3 or 6 credit hours. These hours will serve in part for the internship requirement for the Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry.

 

MIN 4223

Women in the Church/Ministry

3 Hours

Examines the history of the woman’s role in church leadership and its impact on the modern day church.

 

MIN 4233

The Lay Minister

3 Hours

Examines the critical role the lay minister serves in the church and support function of the Pastor.

 

MIN 4313

Church Administration

3 Hours

The fundamentals of understanding and creating the organizational and fiduciary responsibility of the church.

 

MIN 4315

Christian Ministry Internship V

3 Hours

The purpose of a student internship in an educational program is to test classroom concepts in a real life situation and to report on the results of the classroom/interning experience. The format is to be seen as skeletal and is usually sufficient for Internship reports. It is advisable to keep a daily/weekly log of all activities. Due dates for the project proposal are listed below in the course schedule.

 

MIN 4323

Native American Theology

3 Hours

Native Americans hold certain keys to understanding the Creator and His Creation that Euro-Americans have never been able to comprehend. This course will explore theology through a Native worldview, utilizing texts from past and present, authored by Native Americans.

 

MIN 4325

Christian Ministry Internship VI

3 Hours

The purpose of a student internship in an educational program is to test classroom concepts in a real life situation and to report on the results of the classroom/interning experience. The format is to be seen as skeletal and is usually sufficient for Internship reports. It is advisable to keep a daily/weekly log of all activities. Due dates for the project proposal are listed below in the course schedule.

 

MIN 4416

Senior Capstone Project

6 Hours

Senior Capstone Project is the culmination of the student’s academic training and practical experience in the Bachelor in Christian Ministry degree program. The purpose of this course is to mentor and guide the student in planning, implementing, and evaluating a ministry project. To accomplish this, the student will utilize the theological and practical tools for ministry gained throughout the degree program’s course of study. The student will meet with his/her cohort for planning sessions, participate in online discussion sessions, implement the project, write a report on the process and results of the project, and present the final results. Through this experience, the church leader will improve his/her leadership skills and become more effective in their respective place of service.

 

MIN 4523

Native American Ministry Internship

3 Hours

All students wishing to graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry are required to complete 12 credit hours of internship before completing their degree.  This internship will usually take place during each semester of the academic program beginning with the Junior year, and may culminate in a larger number of credit hours in the final semester.

 

Native American Ministry Internship is designed specifically for those who anticipate working the American Indian Church or ministries.  Generally, this internship will be taken during the student’s senior year.

 

MIN 4533

Christian Counseling with Native Americans

3 Hours

Christian Counseling with Native Americans will introduce the Christian leader to the biblical, psychological, and clinical foundations of Christian counseling among Native persons.   The student will learn the Creation Therapy model of counseling and will learn how to apply these insights to the unique challenges in counseling native persons.  Specifically, the course will teach how, in Christian counseling, to apply the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the “soul wounding” of American Indians that has resulted in unresolved grief as acted out in alcoholism, family dysfunction, abuse, high suicide rates, and hopelessness.

 

 

MIN 4883

Certification in Christian Counseling I

3 Hours

This is a 2-semester course designed to lead the student through the process of certification through the National Christian Counselors Association of Sarasota, FL. The National Christian Counselors Association is an educational and training organization for Christian counselors. This course will be taken by special arrangement under the Christian Ministry faculty who have completed certification. All counseling training will take place under the direction of a certified and licensed counseling supervisor.

 

MIN 4893

Certification in Christian Counseling II

3 Hours

This is the second half of the Certification process. It is designed to lead the student through the process of certification through the National Christian Counselors Association of Sarasota, FL. The National Christian Counselors Association is an educational and training organization for Christian counselors. This course will be taken by special arrangement under the Christian Ministry faculty who have completed certification. All counseling training will take place under the direction of a certified and licensed counseling supervisor. Pre-requisite: MIN 4883

 

 

MIN 4993-6-9

Christian Ministry Internship

3-6-9 Hours

On-site mentored experience in providing Christian ministry in various relevant settings.

 


24.9. CLE - COLLEGE LEARNING ENRICHMENT

CLE 1103

First Year Seminar

3 Hours

First Year Seminar (previously called Freshman Seminar) has two (2) purposes: (a) to improve student performance and retention and (b) to provide students with an extensive introduction to the purposes of higher education in general and to the expectations, demands, and resources of Bacone College in particular. It is required of all full-time entering freshmen in the college and transfer students with fewer than thirty (30) college hours. All students will have their “temperament” and “learning styles” assessed to help them make better decisions about their learning and studying. The course includes orientation to college facilities, campus protocol, policies, services, service learning, socialization, personal growth and adjustment, study behavior, academic and career development. Class attendance and involvement in campus events is a major part of this course. BACONE CORE


24.10. COM - COMMUNICATIONS

COM 1103

Basic Photography I

3 Hours

Novice students learn photography fundamentals, including theoretical and practical experience in shooting a 35mm camera while incorporating digital processing. Students must furnish film, pay for digital processing, and either furnish their own single-lens reflex manually operated camera with interchangeable lenses, or make a $20 refundable damage deposit (see instructor for details). Extensive lab required.

 

COM 1113

Media Culture

3 Hours

Students gain insight into a variety of media outlets through a brief overview of their historical backgrounds and the role each has played since its origin. Class discussions include the digital age, newspapers, magazines, books, radio, the recording industry, television, movies, advertising, public relations, social issues, and ethics. Students will learn how the media affects them and society directly. Potential areas examined include multiculturalism, digital technology, the Internet, media as propaganda, social impact and consequences of an audio-visual public, etc. This course fulfills the LIT requirement of the Guided Liberal Arts Electives.

 

 

COM 1123

Media Writing

3 Hours

Students learn the basics of the journalistic processes of gathering, writing, and evaluating a variety of news stories, including interviewing techniques, writing leads, structuring a story, and polishing a story. Primary emphasis is on written articles required for The Baconian, the campus newspaper, including feature stories, personal columns, sports, reviews, and news stories. An extensive lab in the Baconian newsroom is required; successful students will have a minimum o five stories published during the semester. Qualifying Baconian staff members will be paid for their assistance with the student newspaper.

 

COM 1133

Media Design and Layout

3 Hours

For Journalism majors or students interested in any print media production. Through responsibilities as staff members of The Baconian, students learn basic skills to identify, gather, write, and verify news for print media, photography and advertising. Other skills covered include copy and photo editing and digital formatted desktop publishing on MacIntosh computers. Extensive lab required. Qualifying Baconian staff members will be paid for their assistance with the student newspaper. Prerequisite: COM 1123 or permission of instructor.

 

COM 1203

Basic Photography II

3 Hours

This continuation of Basic Photography I introduces more advanced techniques in digital photography, including instruction in Adobe’s Photoshop 7, composition, a photo’s dominant center of interest, a variety of camera angles, and the importance of pre-visualizing an intended image of a photo. Extensive lab. Students must furnish film, pay for digital processing, and either furnish their own single-lens reflex manually operated camera with interchangeable lenses, or make a $20 damage deposit on a school-owned camera (refunded at the end of the semester if the camera is returned in good shape). Prerequisite: COM 1103 equivalent or permission. Class 3 Hours; extensive lab.

 

COM 2013

Introduction to Communication

3 Hours

This course is an introduction to the field of communication with emphasis on the history of communication study, concepts important to all areas of communication, the contexts in which communication occurs, and the issues that must be faced by students of communication.

 

COM 2014

Media Production I w/Lab

4 Hours

A hands-on introduction to the tools, technology, and processes involved with the television studio production process and television news program production and presentation. The course will provide an overview of studio production techniques necessary to be effective at entry level in a broadcast station or production facility. Additionally, the course will introduce basic to intermediate techniques how to produce a current affairs “wrap-around” program from where an on-camera person leads in and out of story packages. The PRODUCTION I course builds upon the foundation of COM2003 INTRODUCTION TO MASS MEDIA and expands students’ skills in hands-on production and on-camera presence. The COM2014 PRODUCTION I is a 4 credit course that requires students to complete laboratory experience that illustrate the principles studied in COM2014 PRODUCTION I class.

 

COM 2103

Media Production

1 Hour

An introductory course which provides multimedia instruction to create content for convergent media and audiences. This course teaches principal skills to prepare students to publish in audio, photo, print, video and web converged platforms.

 

COM 2113

Advanced Media Writing

3 Hours

A continuation of COM 1113, this class includes writing experience on longer features, editorials, and interpretive news articles. Students participate in production of college newspaper. Emphasis is placed on news gathering techniques, skill improvement in speed, accuracy and clarity in writing, and meeting deadlines. Prerequisite: COM 1123.

 

 

 

 

COM 2123

Social Media

3 Hours

The course teaches individuals how to create a social media campaign, and how to analyze and present data to address organizational issues and make appropriate business decisions. ... You will also learn how to build social media strategies and tactics, build and manage campaigns, and develop social media content.

 

COM 2133

Media Production II

3 Hours

This course introduces students to documentary production. Students will learn basic principles of non-fiction storytelling with emphasis on the aesthetic, intellectual, and ethical considerations involved in this cinematic form. Prerequisite: COM 2103.

 

 

COM 2141

Media Production Workshop

1 Hour

Students gain hands-on experience on The Baconian student newspaper through three possible options: [1] a special project, coordinated with instructor; [2] those interested in working on The Baconian but who are unable to take COM 1123 or COM 1133 due to unavailability of hours; [3] advanced students who have completed COM 1123 and COM 1133. May be repeated for credit. Qualifying Baconian staff members will be paid for their assistance with the student newspaper. Extensive lab required. Permission of instructor required.

 

COM 2213

Introduction to Broadcasting

3 Hours

Students gain familiarity with the field of broadcasting through a comprehensive introduction to wire services, television, radio, the Internet, and related careers. Designed for those planning to pursue a baccalaureate degree in Journalism, the course covers preparation of consistent and readable copy for broadcast news; common broadcast news language and jargon; organizational flow of informative stories; coverage of a variety of events; live broadcasting; and the ethics and laws associated with broadcast news

 

COM 2553

Christian Film

3 Hours

This course allows the student to apply the basics of film analysis, cinematic elements, genre, and narrative to artistic films with a Christian theme.

 

COM 2773

Digital Storytelling ADOBE

3 Hours

This course teaches the student how to apply the principles of great storytelling in the use Adobe creative tools to create impactful digital stories which can be used effectively in all subject areas, allowing students to improve their communication skills and digital literacy while learning key content objectives.

 

COM 2883

American Indian Film

3 Hours

This course critically examines the portrayal of American Indians in film, including art films, cinema, documentaries and works by Native filmmakers.  The course also aims to strengthen student skills in writing, speaking and reading critically and effectively in peer group and independent projects.

 

COM 3223

Screenwriting

3 Hours

This course introduces the neophyte screenwriter to the basic elements of the screenwriting craft with special emphasis on the screen treatment and provides him/her with a forum of instructor/peer review of his/her work. Cross listed ENG 3553

 

COM 3693

Digital Broadcasting

3 Hours

This course explores the interactivity and narrative of digital media through the creation of audio and video projects as a tool for seeing, exploring, expressing and social critique – an examination of the principles of storytelling across a range of digital media formats, with attention to techniques for creating story-rich projects. Prerequisite: COM 2013

 

COM 4333

Cyberculture

3 Hours

This course aims, broadly, to provide a foundation in understanding the relationship between society and technology, with a focus on digital, social communications media. Prerequisite: COM 2013

 

COM 4363

Advanced Communication

3 Hours

This course emphasizes advanced forms of written, oral, visual, and electronic communication. Prerequisite: COM 2013

 

 

 


24.11. CIS - COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS

CIS 1113

Fundamentals of Personal Computing

3 Hours

An introductory skills course in major software applications used in professional environments: word processing, spreadsheets, presentation, database, and electronic communications. Additionally, the computer operating system, data storage, and file management are addressed.

 

CIS 2113

Information in Modern Society

3 Hours

Introduction to the history of computers, computer and network organization, principles of ethical utilization. Hands-on experience utilizing a variety of computer software tools including word processing, databases management, graphics, spreadsheet, and Internet applications.

 

CIS 2223

Fundamentals of Information Technology

3 Hours

Introduces students to the academic discipline of IT, including IT themes: IT history: Organizational issues; Relationships of IT to other computing disciplines; Introduces students to a general purpose programming language.

 

CIS 2233

Computing Platforms

3 Hours

Basics of computer operating systems, including configuration, file systems, security, administration, interfacing, multitasking, performance analysis. Hands on exposure to commonly used Operation Systems and to system and network administration.

 

CIS 2313

Data Structures and Algorithms

3 Hours

A study of fundamental algorithms and data structures include searching and sorting techniques, effective storage methods, encryption, compaction, and graph theory. Prerequisites:  CIS 2373 and CIS 2553

 

CIS 2373

Functional Programming

3 Hours

Introduces students to the basics of programming, including data structures, programming constructs, algorithms and problem solving, event-driven programming, and recursion. Prerequisite: CIS 2223

 

CIS 2443

Introduction to Website Construction

3 Hours

Basics of the design, construction and publication of websites. Basic work with graphics and multimedia as they relate to web pages.

 

CIS 2553

Networking and the Internet

3 Hours

Builds a deeper understanding of how networks work, including the topics of LANs, WANs, service providers, communication protocols, network design and management. Prerequisite: CIS 2223

 

CIS 2661

Website Production

1 Hour

A hands-on lab involved in the development and maintenance of the Bacone College website. Combines technical skills including the use of web page development tools and the development of graphics with personal skills including relationship building with subject matter experts and with clients. May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor required for enrollment. Prerequisite: CIS 2443

 

CIS 3213

Technology Application in Business

3 Hours

Development of advanced skills in widely used personal application software as applied in the business environment.

 

CIS 3313

Software Systems and Design

3 Hours

The design of computer-based solutions to individual and organizational problems. Involves an analysis of subsystems, user interfaces, hardware/software selection and evaluation, and system implementation; explores interface between systems and individuals and systems and organizations.  Prerequisite:  CIS 2233

 

CIS 3383

Object Oriented Programming

3 Hours

Programming techniques in object-oriented programming, including data abstraction, inheritance, polymorphism

and dynamic object creation. Emphasis will be placed on the reusability of objects and focus on object concepts

as they deal with future program maintenance. Prerequisite: CIS 2373

 

CIS 3393

Web Programming

3 Hours

An introduction to the programming of highly portable applications and applets, scripting for dynamic web pages and client side programming languages.

 

CIS 3413

Human Computer Interaction

3 Hours

Human factors in systems design; Human-centered evaluation; Developing effective interfaces; Emerging technologies; Human-centered software; Accessibility. Prerequisite: CIS 3313

 

CIS 3513

Information Systems and Security

3 Hours

Security mechanisms; Fundamental aspects; Security services; Information states; Threat analysis model; Vulnerabilities; Attacks; Policy; Operational issues; Forensics; Security domains. Prerequisite: CIS 3313

 

CIS 4113

Management Information Systems

3 Hours

Responsibilities of management in the creation, control, and utilization of information systems that support managerial decision-making.  Requirements; Acquisition/ sourcing; Integration; Project management; Architecture; Teamwork concepts and issues; Intellectual property; Organizational context. Prerequisite: CIS 3213

 

CIS 4213

Database Programming and Management

3 Hours

Builds a deeper understanding of how databases work, including the topics of database theory and architecture, data modeling, normalization, query languages, security, and Web applications specific to typical business environments. Prerequisites: CIS 2373 and CIS 3213

 

CIS 4323

 Topics in Information Systems

3 Hour

Emerging or advanced topics in the development of information system applications The specific topic may vary from semester to semester, as may the associated course prerequisites. This course is repeatable for different topic.

 

CIS 4513

Operations Research

3 Hours

Methods to describe and analyze large-scale decision problems. include linear programming and network formulations, the simplex algorithm and its computer implementation, sensitivity analysis, duality, network algorithms, and dynamic programming.  Prerequisite: CIS 3213


24.12. CJS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES

CJS 1103

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 Hours

An overview and examination of the American system of criminal justice, including the system's composition, operations, and its problems.

 

CJS 1123

Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime

3 Hours

History, pharmacology, health consequences and crime-related aspects of mind-affecting drugs. Emphasis on the effects of criminal behavior, the legal responses to the problem and the treatment and prevention of abuse.

 

CJS 2001

Criminal Justice Club

1 Hour

Introduces criminal justice majors to various careers in criminal justice through interaction with criminal justice professionals, field trip experiences, community service projects and leadership training for club officers.   Each student must participate in at least one community service project.  Criminal justice majors may earn 1 credit hour and up to 2 credits total for taking the Criminal Justice Club course.

 

 

 

 

CJS 2213

Juvenile Justice

3 Hours

An examination of juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice, including legal and social history, definition and explanation of delinquency and assessment of delinquency prevention programs. Philosophical, legal, and procedural principles will be applied to problems and cases of juvenile justice. Prerequisite: CJS 1103. 

 

CJS 2303

The Courts and Constitutional Law

3 Hours

An examination of the jurisdictions, policies, constitutional legalities, and procedures of the courts in the administration of criminal justice. Prerequisite: CJS 1103.

 

CJS 2313

State Criminal Law

3 Hours

Survey of criminal law, including development of substantive criminal law.  Examination of judicial opinions related to the criminal justice process. Prerequisite: CJS 1103.

 

 

CJS 2413

Federal Corrections Law

3 Hours

This course is designed to familiarize students with correctional alternatives as they currently exist. Controversies and emerging trends in corrections will be considered. Prerequisite: CJS 1103.

 

CJS 2423

Probation and Parole

3 Hours

This course examines probation as a sentencing alternative to incarceration and the use of parole for those already incarcerated who meet statutory requirements for early release.

 

CJS 2513

Forensics I: Intro to Forensic Sciences

3 Hours

Role of forensic science in criminal justice. Major issues, legal aspects, research problems and practices. Techniques of crime scene search, including the collection and preservation of physical evidence, class and individual scientific tests, rules of evidence governing admissibility of physical evidence and expert testimony. Prerequisites: CJS 1103 and CJS 2313.

 

CJS 2613

Law Enforcement: The Process of Policing

3 Hours

Survey of law enforcement, its history, police practices, functions, and related issues and concepts of contemporary police. Prerequisite: CJS 1103.

 

CJS 2653

Theories of Crime and Deviance

3 Hours

The study of the origins of criminal behavior from a multidisciplinary approach (biological, psychological, sociological, criminological), addressing major theories and research. Examines behaviors in light of theories and classification concepts. Prerequisites: CJS 1103 and SOC 2213 or PSY 1113. 

 

CJS 2813

Organized and White Collar Crime

3 Hours

An analysis of organized and white-collar crime problems in America. Topics will include prevalence, investigative techniques, causes and effects, and both social and criminological responses to counter its dominance in American society. Prerequisites: CJS 1103, CJS 2313 and CJS 3313

 

CJS 2991-2996

Professional Practice: Cooperative Education in Criminal Justice

1-6 Hours

Field Placement in a criminal justice organization/agency for observation, participation and study.  Interns work with designated agency personnel and receive an overview of agency functions. Students that elect to participate in the STOP program will get a hands-on approach to campus safety and security. Must be CJS Major with 2.0 cumulative GPA; prerequisites:  CJS 1103 and CLE 1103.

 

CJS 3113

Social Ethics

3 Hours

This course is designed to explore justice, law, and civic life from historical, comparative, social science, and contemporary perspectives. The course will introduce students to the broad foundation of interdisciplinary knowledge illustrating the importance, functions, and effects of law and justice. The course will illustrate the principles of justice through contemporary issues and it will focus on what individuals can do to pursue justice in society. Must be a CJS Major with 2.0 cumulative GPA; Prerequisite: CJS 1103 and CLE 1103.  Permission of instructor.

 

 

 

CJS 3263

Interview and Interrogations

3 Hours

For criminal justice majors, Interviewing and Interrogations course is an elective course. This course introduces the student to the practice of interviews and interrogations. This course is intended to familiarize students with techniques used in the field of interviewing and interrogations, along with legal considerations for the admissibility of the information. This course is also designed to provide a foundation for special populations such as children, the elderly, and persons with disability.

 

CJS 3293

Special Topics in Justice Studies

3 Hours

This course is designed to explore criminal justice and related issues in greater depth in a formal academic setting than is possible in other structured courses offered in justice studies.  It may be repeated with different topics to a maximum of nine hours credit. Topics may include leadership in emergency preparedness, domestic violence, strategies for peacekeeping in a diverse society, ethics in criminal justice, computer crime, identity theft, terrorism, criminal profiling, criminal gangs, women and crime, etc.  Must be a CJS Major with 2.0 cumulative GPA; Prerequisite: CJS 1103 and CLE 1103.

 

CJS 3313

Federal and Tribal Criminal Law

3 Hours

Examines the unique sovereignty status of American Indians and the legal relationship between the tribes and the United States government. Must be a CJS Major with 2.0 cumulative GPA; Prerequisite: CJS 1103 and CLE 1103.

 

CJS 3413

Research Methodology and Program Evaluation

3 Hours

Scientific methods in criminal justice research. Design, data collection, and analysis, interpretation of findings, ethical concerns, and the evaluation of the process and outcomes of programs. Prerequisite: CJS 2653.

 

CJS 3513

Race, Gender, and Crime

3 Hours

A socio-historical analysis of the effects of race, ethnicity and gender on legitimate social opportunities, criminal behavior, victimization and differential judicial processing. Prerequisite: CJS 1103.

 

CJS 3613

Comparative and Historical Criminal Justice

3 Hours

Crime and the American criminal justice system from the colonial period to the mid-twentieth century. Crime and criminal justice systems in other countries will be analyzed and compared to the current U.S. Criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJS 1103. 

 

CJS 3623

Criminal Investigation

3 Hours

This course will examine the origins of criminal investigation and trace its development to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the use of the scientific method and the interrelationship of criminal investigators with criminalistics. The recognition, documentation, and collection of physical evidence will be the major areas of concentration for this course. The course will also examine and analyze the fundamentals of criminal investigation, duties and responsibilities of the detective, interviewing, interrogation, and information-gathering skills, crime scene analysis, collection, preservation, and testing of evidence, surveillance and undercover work, raid and sting operations, use of technology, scientific aids, sources of information, and case preparation. Prerequisite: CJS 1103

 

CJS 3713

Victimology

3 Hours

Crime victims will be analyzed through the utilization of theory and the criminal justice systems' treatment and management of victims. Includes expanded coverage of restorative justice, the role of the victims in crimes, their decisions to report crimes and help prosecute offenders, and victim assistance. Special focus on family and sexual violence. Prerequisite: CJS 1103 and SOC 2213 or PSY 1113.

 

CJS 3913

Crisis Management and Conflict Resolution

3 Hours

A study of intervention strategies utilized to cope with psychosocial human interaction problems in the criminal justice system. Crisis management, conflict resolution, and mediation practices will be examined and explored. Prerequisite: CJS 2413 and CJS 2613.

 

CJS 4013

State Corrections Law

3 Hours

Theoretical basis, current methodology and operational understanding of court counselors, citizen action, probation and parole, half-way houses, work-release, drug abuse treatment, detention, reception and diagnostic centers, death penalty issues, as well as the legal aspects of corrections.

 

 

 

 

CJS 4113

Introduction to Criminal Psychology

3 Hours

An introduction to the scientific study of criminals' thoughts and behavior patterns. Special focus on case studies of serial murders and sex offenders, including extensive coverage of the sociopath and other high profile offenders. Prerequisites: CJS 1103 and SOC 2213 or PSY 1113.

CJS 4213

Forensics II: Forensic Scientific Procedures

3 Hours

A comprehensive analysis of legal, ethical, and practical issues involving forensic techniques in the field, the crime laboratory, and the impact of scientific evidence on the justice system. Techniques and process in analysis of physical evidence, including spectroscopy, chromatography, microscopy, as well as the analysis of trace evidence: hairs and fibers, paints, explosives, glass, and soil. Satisfactorily completed a biology or chemistry class.  Also must be a CJS Major with 2.0 cumulative GPA; Prerequisite: CJS 1103 and CLE 1103.

 

CJS 4313

Community Policing

3 Hours

Community policing philosophy, applications, issues, and contemporary research. Community policing models. Prerequisite: CJS 2613.

 

CJS 4413

Police Problems and Practices

3 Hours

An analysis of traditional and contemporary issues and problems existing in the community. Topics represent a wide variety of concerns, including corruption, use of deadly force, and the utilization of law enforcement to combat terrorism and computer crime. Prerequisite: CJS2613.

 

CJS 4954

Issues in Justice (Capstone)

4 Hours

Criminal Justice Administration has been designed to assist the student in understanding the operation and administration of criminal justice organizations. Aspects of organizational theory will be examined to enable the student to better understand the on-the-job experiences of their subsequent professional practice placement, their current criminal justice position, or their future criminal justice career. Ethical Dilemmas, as well as multicultural issues in the administration of justice, will be explored. CAPSTONE COURSE. Students will have the opportunity to apply, in an integrative fashion, knowledge and skills acquired in their previous criminal justice courses.

 

CJS 4993,-6,-9

Criminal Justice Internship

6-12 Hours

Field placement in an approved criminal justice related agency. Interns work with designated agency personnel and receive an overview of agency functions, as well as an integration of theory and practice. Senior classification with a 2.40 cumulative GPA restriction. For Criminal Justice Majors only.  6-12 CREDIT HOURS

 


24.13. ECH - ARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

ECH 2003

Creative Experiences and Play

3 Hours

This course is designed to assist pre-service teachers in becoming comfortable with the creative arts (visual arts, dance, and drama/theatre, and music) through a blend of background information, activities and activity ideas. Through providing the basic tools and activities that teachers will need, this course will stimulate the learning process, enrich other subject areas, and provide opportunities for creative expression, inquiry and self-fulfillment. Prerequisite: PED 1002. All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above and 2.75 GPA

 

ECH 2102

Foundations of Early Childhood Education

2 Hours

This course presents an overview of early childhood education with emphasis given to the historical roots and development of childhood education, contributions of leaders in the field, and description of programs that meet the needs of young children. The development of a philosophy of early childhood education is an important part of the course. Prerequisite: PED 1002. PASS-PORT Portfolio required for Early Childhood Education Majors only.

ECH 2103

Child Development (Birth - 8 years)

3 Hours

This course presents a general study into the field of child development by examining the changes that occur in a child’s cognitive skills, emotional patterns, motor behavior, and social capacities from birth to age eight from the perspective of an early childhood educator. Each student will complete a case study of a child utilizing developmental profiles and relating findings to developmentally appropriate practice. Prerequisite: None.

 

ECH 2203

Health, Safety, and Nutrition of Children

3 Hours

This course examines the health, safety, and nutrition needs of young children in relation to their social-emotional, physical, and cognitive development. The emphasis is on creating a developmentally appropriate and positive environment for learning that is psychologically and physically healthy for young children in various types of settings in early childhood education, family, and center care. Prerequisite: None.

 

ECH 3103

Families, Schools, and Communities

3 Hours

This course analyzes family, school, and community resources and needs as related to the family life cycle. Participants examine child welfare and education through, and explore careers related to children and families. Strategies to improve communication and collaboration are emphasized with a focus on family types, cultures, economic conditions, school systems, community services, political forces, and other factors that impact young children and their families. Ten hours per semester in approved field work required. 3 semester credit hours.

 

ECH 3123

Infant/Toddler Brain Development

3 Hours

This course examines the neurological development of the brain, with emphasis on infant and toddler development, current research, and the current ongoing debate of nature versus nurture. The course will also focus on appropriate activities, curriculum, and environment that stimulate proper brain development in infants and toddlers, as well as the results of improper brain development. Prerequisite: Child Development (Birth – 8 years).

 

ECH 4102 

Early Childhood Capstone Seminar

2 Hours

The purpose of the Capstone Seminar is to provide the student an opportunity to showcase their professional knowledge, skills, and abilities developed as a result of coursework in the Early Childhood Development and Education degree program. The capstone seminar will involve developing a variety of artifacts and documents that show competencies in a variety of early childhood subject areas. Prerequisite: Advisor Approval Prerequisite.

 

ECH 4103

Integrated Curriculum and Assessment

3 Hours

This course provides teacher candidates with the knowledge base that will prepare them to understand, plan, and develop an integrated curriculum that includes appropriate assessments. Emphasis will also include evaluation of early childhood curriculum and the role, function, and appropriate use of various assessment tools. Course must be taken concurrently with ECH 4203, EHC 3003, PED 3303, and ECH 4002. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, 2.5 CGPA, and SOE advisor approval.

 

ECH 4112

Early Childhood Internship Seminar

2 hours

The purpose of this course is to provide weekly opportunities to reflect, assess, and share internship experiences with peers enrolled in the early childhood internship. Students will develop a professional portfolio and resume that reflects and documents their professional growth during their internship experience.

 

ECH 4113

Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Programs

3 Hours

This course focuses on the management of high quality early childhood programs. The course will explore the complex role that child care plays in supporting families. Focus will be placed on the development of knowledge and skills essential to providing quality programs. Advisor Approval

 

ECH 4115

Early Childhood Student Teaching (Grades PK-K)

5 Hours

Student teaching is designed to provide opportunities for teacher candidates to develop and demonstrate their competency as a professional educator in the actual classroom, working with an experienced mentor teacher and college supervisor. Teacher candidate must enroll in ECH 4115, ECH 4125, and PED 4202 concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching, 2.5 CGPA and Advisor Approval. PASS-PORT Portfolio and Criminal History required.

 

ECH 4116

Early Childhood Capstone Experience

6 Hours

The purpose of the ECH Capstone Experience is to provide the student an opportunity to showcase the knowledge, skills, and developed as a result of coursework in the Early Childhood Development and Education degree program. The capstone experience will involve developing a variety of artifacts and documents that show competencies in a variety of early childhood subject areas. Prerequisite: Advisor Approval

 

 

ECH 4125

Early Childhood Student Teaching (Grades 1-3)

5 Hours

Student teaching is designed to provide opportunities for teacher candidates to develop and demonstrate their competency as a professional educator in the actual classroom, working with an experienced mentor teacher and college supervisor. Teacher candidate must enroll in ECH 4115, ECH 4125, and PED 4202 concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching, 2.5 CGPA and Advisor Approval. PASS-PORT Portfolio and Criminal History required.

 

ECH 4203

Science, Social Studies, and Math in Early Childhood

3 Hours

This course provides a study of the curriculum materials, activities, and instructional strategies desirable for teaching science, social studies, and math in the early childhood classroom. National standards and state achievement skills are examined in light of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. Emphasis is on interdisciplinary theme construction and assessment strategies to inform instruction.

 

ECH 4216

Early Childhood Internship

6 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide professional experience in an early childhood setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at an instructor-approved site for a minimum of 240 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the students’ professional goals. Internships may include classroom teaching experience, administration of an early childhood program, or experience with a nonprofit organization. Site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected. Prerequisite: Advisor Approval.


24.14. ECEL - EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

ECEL 2003

 Creative Experiences and Play

3 Hours

This course focuses on the role of art, music, dance, dramatics, creativity, and play experiences in the development of children. Through providing the basic tools and activities that teachers will need, this course will stimulate the learning process, enrich other subject areas, and provide creative expression, inquiry, and self-fulfillment. Emphasis is given to integration of these elements into the elementary classroom and curriculum. Prerequisite:  PED 1002     

 

ECEL 4103

 Integrated Curriculum and Assessment

3 Hours

This course provides teacher candidates with the knowledge base that will prepare them to understand, plan, and develop an integrated curriculum that includes appropriated assessments. Emphasis will also include evaluation of elementary curriculum and the role, function, and appropriate use of various assessment tools. Construction and evaluation of classroom tests; test values and limitations; evaluation and administration of standardized tests; portfolio development and evaluation; grading and reporting procedures. For teacher candidates admitted to the School of Education courses must be taken concurrently with ECEL 4203, ECEL 4303, and ECEL 4403.  Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and a 2.5 GPA.  PASS-PORT Portfolio and Criminal History required.

 

ECEL 4203

Social Studies Methods

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching social studies in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory and national social studies standards. National standards and state achievement skills are examined in light of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. Emphasis is on interdisciplinary construction and authentic assessment strategies to inform instruction. For ECH and ELE teacher candidates admitted to the School of Education this course must be taken concurrently with ECEL 4103, and ECH 4203. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and 2.5 GPA. PASS-PORT Portfolio and Criminal History required.

 

ECEL 4303

Science Methods

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching science in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory and national science standards. National standards and state achievement skills are examined in light of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. Emphasis is on interdisciplinary construction and authentic assessment strategies to inform instruction. For ECH and ELE teacher candidates admitted to the School of Education this course must be taken concurrently with ECEL 4103, and ECH 4403. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and 2.5 GPA.  PASS-PORT Portfolio and Criminal History required. 

 

 

ECEL 4403

Math Methods

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching mathematics in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory and national mathematics standards. National standards and state achievement skills are examined in light of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. Emphasis is on interdisciplinary construction and authentic assessment strategies to inform instruction. For ECH and ELE teacher candidates admitted to the School of Education this course must be taken concurrently with ECEL 4103, ECH 4203, and ECH 4203. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and 2.5 GPA. PASS-PORT Portfolio and Criminal History required.

 


24.15. ECDE - EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION

ECDE 2003

Creative Experiences for Preschoolers

3 Hours

This course focuses on the role of art, music, movement, creativity, play, and playground experiences in the development of preschool children. Emphasis is given to integration of these elements into the early childhood classroom and curriculum. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 2013

Child Development (Birth – 8 Years)

3 Hours

This course presents a general study into the field of child development by examining the changes that occur in a child's cognitive skills, emotional patterns, motor behavior, and social capacities from birth to age 8 from the perspective of an early childhood educator. This course is the introductory course for all Early Childhood Development and Education majors.

 

ECDE 2102

Legal Issues in ECE

2 Hours

This course presents a general study into the legal requirements governing early childhood education. These requirements include Licensing requirements, hiring and termination, due process, right to work, handbook policies, and ethical issues within the profession. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 2103

Health, Safety, and Nutrition

3 Hours

This course examines the health, safety, and nutrition needs of young children in relation to their social-emotional, physical, and cognitive development. The emphasis is on creating a developmentally appropriate and positive environment for learning that is psychologically and physically healthy for young children in various types of settings in early childhood education, family and center care. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 2113

Creative Experiences for Infants and Toddlers

3 Hours

This course focuses on the role of art, music, movement, creativity, play, and playground experiences in the development of infants and toddlers. Emphasis is given to integration of these elements into the infant toddler classroom and curriculum. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 2122

Block, Sand, and Water Play for Infants and Toddlers

2 Hours

This course will assist students in developing an understanding of the curriculum benefits of block, sand, and water play as part of a play-based infant/toddler curriculum. Students will develop curriculum to assist with math, science, social/emotional, physical, and language development for infants and toddlers using blocks, sand, and or water as the basis of their activity. Students will learn how to scaffold infants and toddlers construction of knowledge and develop knowledge and skills in developing objectives and assessments for block/sand/water centers for infants and toddlers. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 2213

Motor Skills Development for Preschoolers

3 Hours

This course will prepare the student to develop a child-centered, success-oriented program designed to explore and develop fundamental motor patterns, as well as movement skill and concepts.  The student will recognize and encourage self-initiated movement activities and the use of large and small equipment or apparatus in active learning areas. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 3103

Families, Schools, and Communities

3 Hours

This course focuses on developing an understanding of the importance and role of families and communities in the lives of children and the implications for practice in Early Childhood Education. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 3113

Approaches and Theory in ECH

3 Hours

Students will develop knowledge and understanding concerning important changes and adaptations of the major approaches to early education, such as Montessori, Bank Street, Project Approach, and Reggio Emilia, and the important dimension and characteristics in the development and implementation of the major curricular models and programs in Early Childhood Education. The context and history and current issues and trends in the field as it evolves are reviewed. Emphasis remains on inclusion, diversity, and fostering multicultural competence within the profession to help prepare educators to better serve today’s young children and their families across multiple cultural communities and early education settings. Students will also develop knowledge and understanding of early childhood theory and how various approaches     use theories such as Piaget, Vygotsky, Dewey, and Erikson as a basis for their programing. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 3203

Education of the Exceptional Child in ECH

3 Hours

This course is a general introduction to the characteristics of exceptional learners and their education. Emphasis will be placed on classroom practices, as well as the psychological, sociological, and medical aspects of disabilities and giftedness. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

 

 

ECDE 3212

Appropriate Preschool Environments

2 Hours

This course is designed to assist students in understanding the balance of theory and application to help early childhood professionals understand why and how to design, arrange, and make changes to preschool learning environments that help children achieve national and state standards through a play-based curriculum. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 3222

Appropriate Environments for Infants and Toddlers

2 Hours

This course is designed to assist students in understanding the balance of theory and application to help  early childhood professionals understand why and how to design, arrange, and make changes to infant and toddler learning environments that help children achieve national and state standards through a play-based curriculum. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 3303

Positive Guidance

3 Hours

This course focuses on how to create a learning environment in the classroom that encourages positive social interaction, self-motivation, and active engagement in meaningful and purposeful learning. Students will develop knowledge and understanding of how the learning environment and curriculum relate to positive behaviors. Students will understand the relationship between child development, theory, and positive behaviors. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 3312

Block, Sand, and Water Play for Preschoolers

2 Hours

This course will assist students in developing an understanding of the curriculum benefits of block, sand, and water play as part of a play-based preschool curriculum. Students will develop curriculum to assist with math, science, social/emotional, physical, and language development for preschoolers using blocks, sand, and or water as the basis of their activity. Students will learn how to scaffold preschoolers construction of knowledge and develop knowledge and skills in developing objectives and assessments for block/sand/water centers for preschoolers. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 3323

Responsive Program Planning

3 Hours

Students will be able to clearly explain theory, including current research, and explain appropriate practice in development, curriculum, program planning, guidance, and professionalism. Students will learn to use a relationship-based model for understanding how infants and toddlers grow and learn in typical and atypical ways. Students will value the importance of families’ and teachers’ relationships and responsiveness in interactions with children, understand the latest developmental research, child-centered planning, infants and toddlers with special needs, and a focus on the effects of culture, families, and quality programs on infant-toddler development and interactions. Develop a deeper understanding of why, according to the science of child development, certain practices support or hinder an infant’s or toddlers’ optimal development–and how to provide responsive, high-quality care. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 4003

Supporting Play in ECE

3 Hours

Students will develop knowledge, understanding and skill in recognizing that children are predisposed to play—either alone or with others. For this reason, play formed the foundation of early childhood education during its infancy. Students will examine play from a variety of disciplines using multiple perspectives. Students will understand the benefits and value of play for young children specifically, that play contributes to cognitive, social, emotional, and physical growth and development. Support for play as a medium for learning has been established by scholars such as Piaget, Vygotsky, Bruner, Pelligrini, Reifel, Johnson, Christie, Bergen, and Smith. The most current neuroscience provides evidence for these findings. Students will demonstrate their knowledge and skill in creating environments, assessments and curriculum that support play for students birth through age five. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 4103

Authentic Assessment in ECH

3 Hours

Students will learn to construct a comprehensive system of assessments that fit together into a coherent system linked to child outcomes. Students will learn to create assessments that are developmentally appropriate and support children's learning and improve instruction. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 4113

Organization and Administration in ECE

3 Hours

This course focuses on the management of high quality early childhood programs.  The course will explore the complex role that child care plays in supporting families and the community. Focus will be placed on the development of knowledge and skills essential to providing quality programs that meet the diverse needs of children. (Prerequisite ECDE 2013 Child Development)

 

ECDE 4116

Capstone Experience

6Hours

The purpose of the ECH Capstone Experience is to provide the student an opportunity to showcase the knowledge, skills, and developed as a result of coursework in the Early Childhood Development and Education degree program. The capstone experience will involve developing a variety of artifacts and documents that show competencies in a variety of early childhood subject areas. Prerequisite: Advisor Approval and completion of all specialization and professional coursework)

 

ECDE 4203

Social Studies and Social Emotional Development for Preschoolers

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching social studies and social emotional development with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory and national social studies standards. National standards and state achievement skills are examined in light of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. Emphasis is on interdisciplinary construction and authentic assessment strategies to inform instruction. (To be taken concurrently the semester prior to the ECDE Capstone with ECDE 4303, 4403, and 4503)

 

ECDE 4213

Social/Emotional Development for Infants and Toddlers

3 Hours

This course will assist students in developing knowledge and understanding that social-emotional development includes the child’s experience, expression, and management of emotions and the ability to establish positive and rewarding relationships with others. It encompasses both intra- and interpersonal processes. Students will gain knowledge that the core features of emotional development include the ability to identify and understand one’s own feelings, to accurately read and comprehend emotional states in others, to manage strong emotions and their expression in a constructive manner, to regulate one’s own behavior, to develop empathy for others, and to establish and maintain relationships. Students will develop knowledge and skill in creating curriculum and environments that support healthy social and emotional development between peers and caregivers. (To be taken concurrently the semester prior to the ECDE Capstone with ECDE 4313, ECDE 4413, and ECDE 4513)

 

ECDE 4303

Science and Math For Preschoolers

3 Hours

This course provides a study of the curriculum materials, activities, and instructional strategies desirable for teaching science and mathematics in the early childhood classroom.  National standards and state achievement skills are examined in light of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment.  Emphasis is on interdisciplinary theme construction and assessment strategies to inform instruction.  (To be taken concurrently the semester prior to the ECDE Capstone with ECDE 4203, 4403, and 4503)

 

ECDE 4313

Science and Math for Infants and Toddlers

3 Hours

This course provides a study of the curriculum materials, activities, and instructional strategies desirable for teaching science and mathematics in the infant/toddler classroom. Learning Objectives are examined in light of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment.  Emphasis is on interdisciplinary theme construction and assessment strategies to inform instruction. (To be taken concurrently the semester prior to the ECDE Capstone with ECDE 4213, ECDE 4413, and ECDE 4513)

 

ECDE 4403

Language Arts for Preschoolers

3 Hours

This course will help students learn effective teaching and assessment strategies to help both native speakers and English Language learners develop skill in listening, speaking, literacy, and writing. Students will develop multiple lesson plans and a unit plan. (To be taken concurrently the semester prior to the ECDE Capstone with ECDE 4203, 4303, and 4503)

 

 

ECDE 4413

Language Arts for Infants and Toddlers

3 Hours

This course will help students learn effective teaching and assessment strategies to help both native speakers and English Language learners develop skill in listening, speaking, literacy, and writing. Students will develop multiple lesson plans and a unit plan. Students will develop a deeper understanding of language and literacy development for infants and toddlers.  (To be taken concurrently the semester prior to the ECDE Capstone with ECDE 4213, ECDE 4313, and ECDE 4513)

 

ECDE 4503

The Project Approach

3 Hours

This course will help students gain the knowledge, skills and ability to develop a preschool project based on children's interested based on Lillian Katz's Project Approach. Students will learn to build on children's natural curiosity, enabling children to interact, question, connect, problem-solve, communicate, reflect, and more. Students will create a project based on children's interest that includes family and community participation. (To be taken concurrently the semester prior to the ECDE Capstone with ECDE 4203, 4303, and 4403)

 

ECDE 4513

The Project Approach (Infants and Toddlers)

3 Hours

This course will help students gain the knowledge, skills and ability to develop a infant/toddler project based on children's interested based on Lillian Katz's Project Approach. Students will learn to build on children's natural curiosity, enabling children to interact, question, connect, problem-solve, communicate, reflect, and more. Students will create a project based on children's interest that includes family and community participation. (To be taken concurrently the semester prior to the ECDE Capstone with ECDE 4213, ECDE 4313, and ECDE 4413)


24.16. ECN - ECONOMICS

ECN 2113

Principles of Economics

3 Hours

An introduction to modern macroeconomic and microeconomic theory including economic analysis of national production, employment and income, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policies, analysis of supply and demand, the price system, and the basic types of market situations.

 

ECN 2513

Microeconomics

3 Hours

This course introduces economic analysis of individual business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to achieve economic objectives efficiently.

 

ECN 2613

Macroeconomics

3 Hours

An introduction to fundamental concepts of macroeconomics with emphasis on supply and demand, national income, unemployment, inflation, causes and consequences of business cycles, fiscal and monetary policy, economic growth, and international trade.

 

ECN 3513

International Economics

3 Hours

This course intends to orient students about the functioning of the international economy. It defines the theoretical principles that govern international trade. In addition, we study empirical evidence of world trade patterns and trade policies of the industrial and developing countries. After explaining international logistics fro trading functions, this course addresses macroeconomic policy in an open economy and international banking system.

 


24.17. ELE - ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

ELE 2003

Art for the Elementary Teacher

3 Hours

This course is designed to assist pre-service educators in becoming comfortable with the creative arts (visual arts, dance, and drama/theater, and music) through a blend of background information, activities and activity ideas.  Through providing the basic tools and activities that teachers will need, this course will stimulate the learning process, enrich other subject areas, and provide opportunities for creative expression, inquiry and self-fulfillment. Prerequisite: PED 1002

 

ELE 3003

Social Studies for the Elementary Teacher

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching social studies in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory and national social studies standards. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and 2.5 CGPA.

 

ELE 3103

Science for the Elementary Teacher

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching science in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory, and national science standards. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and 2.5 CGPA.

 

ELE 3502

Math for the Elementary Teacher

2 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching mathematics in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory, and national math standards. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and 2.5 CGPA.

 

 

ELE 3503

Math for the Elementary Teacher

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching mathematics in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory, and national math standards. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and 2.5 CGPA.

 

ELE 4003

Language Arts in Upper Elementary

3 Hours

This course provides students with a study of the language arts processes taught in upper elementary. Current approaches to teaching language arts are presented, along with underlying theories of learning, appropriate strategies and methodology for teaching, and opportunities to apply knowledge through interaction with students and teachers in language arts classrooms. Communicative competence for all students with appropriate assessment is stressed. Prerequisites: Criminal history check required, 2.75 GPA

ELE 4103

Elementary Curriculum and Assessment

3 Hours

This course examines various curriculum models used in elementary schools today and provides teacher candidates with an opportunity to plan, develop, and assess classroom curriculum. Emphasis is given to the examination, preparation, integration, and utilization of appropriate assessment tools to evaluate student learning as an integral element of curriculum development. Prerequisite: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

ELE 4115

Elementary Student Teaching (Grades 1-3)

5 Hours

Student Teaching is designed to provide opportunities for teacher candidates to develop and demonstrate their competency as a professional educator in the actual classroom (grades 1-3) working with an experienced mentor teacher and college supervisor. Students must enroll in ELE 4115, ELE 4215 and PED 4202 concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bacone Teacher Education Program. All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

ELE 4116

Education Internship

6 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide professional experience in an elementary education setting for qualified students. Each student will intern at an instructor-approved site for a minimum of 100 hours. Internship experiences will be designed to fit the student's professional goals. Internships may include classroom teaching, administration of an early childhood program, or experience with a nonprofit organization. Site requirements and responsibilities will vary depending upon the nature of the site selected. Prerequisite: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA.

 

ELE 4125

Elementary Student Teaching (Grades 4-8)

5 Hours

Student Teaching is designed to provide opportunities for teacher candidates to develop and demonstrate their competency as a professional educator in the actual classroom (grades 4-8) working with an experienced mentor teacher and college supervisor. Students must enroll in ELE 4115, ELE 4215 and PED 4202 concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bacone Teacher Education Program. All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

ELE 4203

Social Studies Methods

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching social studies in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory and national social studies standards. Prerequisite: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

ELE 4303

Science Methods

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching science in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory and national social studies standards. Prerequisite: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

ELE 4403

Math Methods

3 Hours

This course is a study of the materials, activities, and instructional strategies for teaching mathematics in the elementary school with emphasis on best practice based on current research, theory and national social studies standards. Prerequisite: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 


24.18. ENG - ENGLISH

ENG 1113

English Composition I

3 Hours

English Composition I is the first of two writing-intensive courses required of all Bacone students prior

to graduation. Students learn the skills necessary for acceptable collegiate writing, including essay organization, effective prose, college-level vocabulary, and critical thinking. Students must earn a grade of C or better to pass this course.  BACONE CORE

 

ENG 1213

English Composition II

3 Hours

English Composition II continues the study of rhetorical skills begun in ENG 1113 and, by emphasizing the skills of research techniques, analysis, and effective rewriting, culminates in both a formal research paper and a literary analysis. Students must earn a grade of C or better to pass this course. Prerequisite ENG 1113 or equivalent. BACONE CORE

 

ENG 2213

Creative Writing

3 Hours

Creative Writing encourages students to express themselves through poetry and prose and to develop a portfolio of original writings. Students also study guidelines for publication of their own work. Prerequisite: Recommendation by an ENG1113 or ENG1213 instructor, or permission from the course instructor.

 

ENG 3553

Screenwriting

3 Hours

Screenwriting class guides students through the screenwriting process with regular screenwriting practice and analysis of effective screenplays. Course work will include a journal, four screenplay writing assignments, two exams, group work, a movie analysis paper and miscellaneous assignments. CROSS-LISTED WITH COM 3223

 

ENG 3563

20th Century English Novel

3 Hours

An analysis of themes and techniques of noted English and/or Irish novelists which may include Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce, and others, emphasizing critical reading and writing skills.  Prerequisites: ENG 1113, ENG 1213.

 

ENG 3573

20th Century American Novel

3 Hours

An analysis of themes and techniques of major American writers which may include Dos Passos, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, West, Faulkner, and others, emphasizing critical reading and writing skills.  Prerequisites: ENG 1113, ENG 1213

 


24.19. ESE - EXERCISE SCIENCE

ESE 2103

Foundations of Health, Physical Education, and Exercise Science

3 Hours

This is an introductory course dealing with the historical and philosophical approaches to exercise science, health, and  physical education."

 

ESE 2112

Personal Health

2 Hours

This course is designed to provide a personal appreciation, understanding, and awareness of good health practices and well-being by analyzing the causes and effects of major health problems in our society today.

 

ESE 2433

Special Studies in Exercise Science

3 Hours

This course is an independent study course for Exercise Science majors. It provides experiences reading and analyzing scientific literature in exercise science and related areas. When applicable, students will help host campus fitness events and work in the laboratory to learn about equipment and testing. 

 

ESE 3102

Consumer, Environmental, and Community Health

2 Hours

This course is designed to allow students to apply knowledge of how to use risk assessment, critical thinking, goal-setting, and decision-making skills to make informed choices about health behaviors and life style factors. Students will apply knowledge of principles and skills for accessing, evaluating, and selecting valid information, products, and services that enhance health. In addition, students will analyze concepts, principles, and issues associated with environmental health. They will apply knowledge of the role of community, private, and public services and agencies in supporting safe and healthy communities. Students will analyze the influence of society, culture, and the media on personal, family, and community health. (Prerequisite: ESE 2112 Personal Health)

 

ESE 3114

Exercise Physiology I

4 Hours

An overview of the study of anatomical mechanical phenomena including major organs and tissues, and how they are affected by human motion and the study of the biological and biochemical processes associated with exercise and the underlying function of cells and organ systems in the human body. Prerequisite: CHM 1364, BIO 2134 requirements for ESE majors only.

 

ESE 3124

Exercise Physiology II

4 Hours

The study of the biological and biochemical processes associated with exercise and overload that affects the underlying function of cells and organ systems. Advanced study of applications of physiological mechanisms and how they respond to acute and chronic exercise in a wide variety of intensity, duration, and frequency. Prerequisite: ESE 3114 and CHM 1364.

 

ESE 3303

Wellness and Fitness

3 Hours

A study of the various lifestyle areas that influence one’s physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. A major focus of the course is directed toward an individual awareness of ways to better develop these lifestyle areas in a positive manner and to strive toward a balance lifestyle.

 

ESE 3403

Prevention and Care of Injuries

3 Hours

This course is designed for Exercise Science students prospective coaches, trainers, and other professionals to assist in the prevention, recognition, evaluation, and care of athletic injuries.  Lecture and lab sessions will focus on taping methods and the rehabilitation of injuries.  

 

ESE 3513

Kinesiology

3 Hours

This course is designed to give students an understanding of how the human body moves anatomically and mechanically and then be able to apply the principles learned to improve movement.  

 

ESE 3603

Strengths and Conditioning Certification Preparation

3 Hours

This course covers basic anatomy and physiology and the training effect, basic muscle anatomy and physiology, basic kinesiology and biomechanics, strength theory, conditioning theory, basic sports nutrition theory, training muscle mass, sports and fitness exercise, Olympic lifting for athletes, weight training technology, special topics in sports and fitness training, sports medicine, and organizing your sports conditioning plan and program. 

 

ESE 3703

Personal Training Certification Preparation

3 Hours

This course includes basic anatomy and physiology and the training effect, muscle anatomy and physiology, basic kinesiology and biomechanics, strength theory, fitness theory, training systems and applications introduction, basic fitness nutrition theory, weight technology, sports and fitness exercises, flexibility exercises, communication skills development, special topics in sports and fitness training, and exercise programming for special populations.

 

ESE 4113

Administration of Exercise Prescription

3 Hours

A comprehensive presentation of the administrative philosophies and techniques as they apply to a variety of health and fitness vocations. Management environments such as fitness, healthcare, and education will be studied, along with principles of leadership in each area. Prerequisite: ESE 4213 and ESE 3114.

 

 

ESE 4203

Health and Fitness Specialist Preparation

3 Hours

This course will provide a detailed overview of the competencies covered within a Health and Fitness

Specialist Certification review course. This course will prepare the student to attempt the American

College of Sports Medicine’s (ACSM) Health and Fitness Specialist (HFS) certification by

incorporating ACSM's Exercise is Medicine (EIM) global health initiative throughout this text prepares

the HFS to become uniquely qualified to work with medical professionals to ensure that all patients

and clients are participating in a physical activity program. Coverage of assessment and programming

for both healthy and special populations and extensive content about behavior change allows the

Health Fitness Specialist to provide program options for varying types of clients. Prerequisite: ESE 4213

 

ESE 4213

Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription

3 Hours

A detailed overview of methods of physical assessment and exercise prescription and a critical examination of their relevancy, reliability, and validity. A research project will be conducted and statistical data analysis performed for proper interpretation. Specific applications of fitness assessment tests will be made and corresponding prescriptions for exercises, training regimens, and activities will be designed for fitness enhancement. Lab required. Prerequisite: ESE 3114

 

ESE 4951-3

Senior Capstone Project

1-3 Hours

Enhances students' critical thinking and problem solving ability in issues and topics related to exercise science. This Capstone experience can take the form of a project, research, or another course. May be taken in conjunction with ESE 4993- 4996 Internship. Enrollment is restricted to senior exercise science majors or with advisor permission.

 

ESE 4993-6

Exercise Science Internship

3-6 Hours

This course provides an opportunity for students to experience and observe specific environments and vocations in the areas of exercise science, medicine, management, therapeutic/fitness modalities, educational environments or other related fields. An internship site will be determined by the student’s future goals. The internship will consist of 120- 240 hours, which is equivalent to three to six credit hours.

Prerequisite: Advisor Approval and as specified in the Internship Handbook


24.20. FSE - FAMILY STUDIES EDUCATION

FSE 1003

Introduction to Family Studies Education

3 Hours

Introduction to Family Studies explores the systematic study of family structures, processes, and dynamics, the matriculation requirements of the program, and opportunities in employment and further education that this major provides. Topics include: contemporary and traditional family practices, satisfaction in family life and sources of family norms with particular attention paid to traditional norms as found in the Judeo Christian ethos as presented in the Bible, American traditions, and Native American traditions.

 

FSE 2103

Families with Special Needs

3 Hours

This course offers students an introduction into special needs that are part of the daily life of many families in the United States. Topics to be address are: exceptionalities in family members (educational, emotional and behavioral), long term medical care of family members, whether chronic or terminal will be addressed. Other topics include review of short term crises in families often caused by catastrophic instances, long term repetitive cycles of dysfunction in families. Another area of learning will be how families outside the mainstream of society (blended families, non-traditional families and immigrant populations) face unique problems and the resources which may be available to them.

 

FSE 2203

Addiction in the Family

3 Hours

Addiction in the family is a timely subject for students in the United States. We are bombarded with news stories of addiction and loss on a daily basis. The use of abuse of opioids is considered a national epidemic. This course considers the effects of addiction on the family system. Information will explore topics of various types of addiction and their impact on the family. Special focus will be given to the historical and present issues which may have led to the current level of addiction in the United States and addiction in various populations.

FSE 2333

Ethnic and Non-Traditional Families

3 Hours

This course considers the evolution of the ethnic minority and immigrant families in America’s historical past and its present and examine families’ cross-cultural variabilities and consistencies. The course examines how the family is currently defined in the U.S., discussing different views about what families may look like. Class and ethnic variability and the effects of changing gender roles are examined. Students also investigate how sexuality, traditional and non-traditional marriage, parenting, divorce, family violence, family economics, poverty, and governmental policies may impact ethnic and non-traditional families. Controversial issues dealt with include day care, welfare policy, and the "Family Values" debate. Special focus will be given to the historical and present issues which may be unique to certain ethnic/social minorities (Native American, Hispanic, African-American, immigrants etc.)

 

FSE 3103

Aging and the Family

3 Hours

Aging and the Family is designed to be an interdisciplinary course to provide all students in any academic discipline, but particularly those in the Family Studies Education Program with a general background in aging and the challenges and strengths which older persons and their families bring into this life phase.

This course focuses upon students developing an understanding of the aging cycle in the latter portions of life and how its matters impact those going through the processes and members of the family. The course will investigate both the nature of the change and how it may correspond to the development of new needs. How aging of family members impacts a family emotionally, financially and logistically will be analyzed and reviewed.

 

FSE 3113

Media and the Family

3 Hours

This course will investigate how media impacts the family and will focus on the portrayal of the American family on television from the 1950s to the present, how family communication is being impacted in the digital age, and how electronic media is impacting the social, emotional, and physiological development of children, from toddlers to adolescents. Topics include how families are portrayed in the media, gender role stereotypes in the media, family communication, screen time and the young child, educational videos and the young child, online dating, social media, chat sites, cyber-bullying, and internet pornography.

FSE 3222

Family Finance

2 Hours

This course will show students how to manage personal and family finances in a practical way.

Economic downturns, recession, credit card debt, downsizing, dead-end jobs, and inadequate or depleted savings all can cause individuals and families to suffer. With these challenges come others as well. Recent studies confirm that more than half of all divorces are the result of financial pressures at home. And spiritually, many people are struggling to maintain a proper perspective amidst the constant tug of materialism. A key concept of the Christian faith is stewardship and proper management of resources.

 

FSE 3333

Community Resources for Families

3 Hours

This course offers a look at the numerous community resources available for families in Muskogee County and nationwide. Every community has needs and deficits that ought to be attended to. In this course we will learn how to identify community assets and resources, and how to engage them in the community change effort. We will identify community assets and resources and show how they can be harnessed to meet community needs and to strengthen the community as a whole.

FSE 3403

Education of the Adult Population

3 Hours

This course will cause students to investigate the challenges and agencies which may impact education of adults. The course will introduce students into basic concepts of andragogy.  Students will investigate variations in purpose, motivation, curriculum, learning style, area of interest between learners in K12 and younger learners in higher education and that of adult populations.  Finally the approaches used by varying agencies (public/private, secular/religious, culturally based) will be compared and contrasted.  Pre-requisites, PED 2603 and ENG 1113 required and PED 3103 co-requisite.  A background check is required for this course.

 

FSE 3663

Geriatric Psychology

3 Hours

This course presents students with theories of psychology that may be particular to human beings as they age and mature. Utilizing the work of Erikson students will identify and analyze the conflicts that humans undergo in their later years investigating the crises and how favorable outcomes (integrity) are achieved and unfavorable outcomes (despair) overcome.

 

FSE 4113

Education Research

3 Hours

Research is a prevailing phenomenon in the modern world. Scholars and practitioners in the academic disciplines and professions engage in research. This course will include an examination of the nature and characteristics of education research. The main purpose is to introduce students to qualitative and quantitative methods for conducting meaningful inquiry and research and to help them become knowledgeable consumers of research data. Students will be able to distinguish between Basic (Theoretical), Applied, and Practical research. They will gain an overview of research intent and design, methodology and technique, format and presentation, and data management and analysis that encourage reflection and innovations critical for the field of education. Prerequisite: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above and 2.75 GPA

 

FSE 4116

Practicum in Family Studies

6 Hours

Family Studies majors meeting the prerequisites will engage in an off-campus internship program in a business or organization whose mission reflects the interests of the student. The student will fulfill a minimum 240 hours spent with the internship organization, supervised by a member of the organization’s management. A journal will be submitted chronicling the events experienced, evaluating and analyzing the methods employed during the day’s activities. The intern will represent Bacone College in a courteous, responsible, and professional manner.

 

FSE 4153

Applications of Family Case Theory

3 Hours

Researchers who study children have emphasized family processes that influence children's psychological well-being and subsequent development and consider the impact of the family as system in adulthood. Drawing on family systems theories, we examine how differences emerge from family interactions in adulthood. Specific application of theoretical principles is discussed and analyzed. especially their appropriateness for working with culturally diverse groups.

 

FSE 4223

Death and Dying

3 Hours

Death and Dying is a process that all human beings go through, and is indeed the last act we do as humans. This course will inform students of the processes of death and dying from the perspectives of the participants, including family and clinical workers. Cultural, historic, and religious views about death will be analyzed. Topics will include: death and dying, grief and bereavement, preparations for families, medical and hospice care, assisted suicide, common cultural perceptions of death and dying, and the differences between a death which is predictable and when an unexpected death occurs. Students will utilize analysis and inquiry skills to refine critical thinking skills on a difficult subject.

 

FSE 4253

Adolescent Psychology

3 Hours

A study of the development and changes that take place as a child moves from childhood into adolescence.  Study includes an analysis of characteristics dominant in adolescence.  Special reference is made to the application of psychological principles.


24.21. FIN - FINANCE

FIN 3113

Business Finance

3 Hours

Theory and practice of capital management. Topics include evaluation of risks, determination of capital structures, measures of costs and returns, allocation of capital, financial planning and models, and a survey of working capital issues. Prerequisite: ACC 2113

 

FIN 3313

Financial Markets and Institutions

3 Hours

Participants, structure, and functions of the major domestic and international financial markets. Furthermore, the course will be a hands-on survey class structured around the techniques needed to understand the investment process in the economic and financial environments. Prerequisite: FIN 3113.

 

FIN 3413

Management of Financial Institutions

3 Hours

Financial institutions as business firms, with emphasis on depository institutions: industry structure, regulation, asset and liability management strategies. Prerequisite: FIN 3113.

 

FIN 3513

Introduction to Risk and Insurance

3 Hours

Fundamental issues of risk management and insurance in property, liability, life and health areas.  Principles of marketing, underwriting, rate making and loss adjustment. Prerequisite: FIN 3113 and FIN 3213.

 

FIN 3553

Money and Banking

3 Hours

Financial institutions as business firms, with emphasis on depository institutions: industry structure, regulation, asset and liability management strategies. Prerequisite:  FIN 3113 and ECN 2113.

 

 

FIN 3613

Short-Term Financial Management

3 Hours

Analysis of working capital management; cash budgeting; financial analysis and planning; short-term financing decisions. Prerequisite:  FIN 3113 and FIN 3213.

 

FIN 3713

Security Analysis and Portfolio Management

3 Hours

Characteristics of financial assets and markets; evaluation of securities; selecting and combining securities into portfolios; portfolio models and measurements of portfolio performance.  Prerequisite:  FIN 3113 and FIN 3213 and FIN 3313.

 

FIN 3813

Financial Planning

3 Hours

Principles and concepts of integrated financial planning, including legal, tax and financial aspects, business planning, retirement planning, estate planning and the use of information technology.  Prerequisite:  FIN 3113, FIN 3213, ACC 2113, ACC 2123, ACC 4213, and MIS 2413.

 

FIN 3913

Real Estate Principles

3 Hours

Principles of real estate, including legal aspects of real estate, appraisal, investment, mortgage financing, home-ownership, and brokerage industry functions. Prerequisite:  FIN 3113 and FIN 3213.

 

 

FIN 4113

Educational Investment Fund

3 Hours

Management of real-money investment funds.  Application of investment theory to an actual portfolio, including development and presentation of recommendations to board of investment professionals.  Prerequisite:  FIN 3113, FIN3 213, ACC 2113, ACC 2123, ACC 4213, and MIS 2413.

 

 

FIN 4413

Risk Management

3 Hours

Management’s role in treating non-speculative risks to which business is exposed.  Emphasis on recognition, evaluation, and treatment of risks.  Prerequisite:   FIN 3113, FIN 3213, ACC 2113, and ACC 2123.

 

FIN 4513

Comprehensive Insurance

3 Hours

This course is an overview of property insurance (identify and measure property direct and indirect loss exposure and insurance coverage used to transfer such exposure), life and health insurance (personal an business risks relating to principles of life and health insurance), and liability insurance (identify and measure liability loss exposures and insurance coverage used to transfer such exposures, including concepts of negligence and liability).  Prerequisite:  FIN 4413.

 

FIN 4913

Financial Derivatives

3 Hours

This course involves financial contracts (i.e. forwards, futures, options, and swaps) whose values are “derived” from the values of other underlying instruments.  The course material will utilize foreign exchanges, bonds, equities and indexes.  Prerequisite:  FIN 3113, FIN 3213, FIN 3313, and FIN 3713.

 

FIN 4996

Professional Practice Internship in Finance

6 Hours

Professional experience in a business environment for qualified students.  Senior classification with a cumulative GPA of 2.40 or above.


24.22. GPS - GENERAL PHYSICAL SCIENCE

 

GPS 1114

General Physical Science 

4 Hours

This course is an overview of basic concepts in the physical sciences. Material covered includes topics from physics, chemistry, astronomy, and earth science.


24.23. BAL - GREAT IDEAS

BAL 1113

Great Ideas of Western Civilization 

3 Hours

This course introduces students to the intellectual foundations of Western Civilization and the study of the humanities. It surveys the major ideas that dominate Western Civilization from the ancient to the modern world, providing students with an outline of major historical movements of thought and an encounter with some of the principal works of philosophy, religion, literature, arts, and history that form the Western intellectual tradition. It provides students with the concepts needed to succeed in the courses that make up the humanities portion of the general education core curriculum.  CROSS-LISTED WITH HIS 1113

 

BAL 2113

Great Ideas in Phil Lit & Social Science: Psychology, Philosophy, Literature and Film

3 Hours

This course examines the intriguing relationships between literature, film and 20th century psychology and philosophy (notably Freud, Jung and and/or Existential Philosophy). Students will apply short readings in psychology and philosophy to works of fiction and films. CROSS-LISTED WITH LIT 2133

 

 

BAL 3123

Great Ideas in Phil Lit & Social Science: History of Satire

3 Hours

Introduction to Satire, a 2500-year retrospective seeking to shed light on the present political/social/psychological landscape in terms of the best satirists of Western Civilization: Aristophanes, Juvenal, Rabelais, Voltaire, Swift, Twain, Orwell, Huxley and others.  Prerequisite: ENG 1213.  CROSS LISTED WITH LIT 3133

 

BAL 4994

Capstone in Liberal Arts

4 Hours

Employing the student’s course transcript as a guide and a faculty mentor, the Liberal Arts capstone project is designed to focus on a student-centered personal synthesis of all those seminal courses that have shaped the student’s academic identity over four years -- whether the project be academic, creative or applied. The capstone project provides ample latitude for a student to follow her passion to explore and create a product or learn something new in the student’s field.   4 Credits Taken in the last semester.

 


24.24. HPE - HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HPE 1121

Weight Lifting (Varsity Sports)

1 Hour

This course in weight lifting and bodybuilding is designed primarily for students participating in intercollegiate athletics and people with high physical education interest.  Class 2 hours.  Grading for this athletics course will be a CR or U instead of a letter grade.

 

HPE 1261

Archery

1 Hour

This course enhances the student’s knowledge of the construction and use of various bows and arrows as well as developing skill in their use.  Class 2 hours.  (Offered when warranted by student interest).    

 

HPE 1272

First Aid

2 Hours

This is a course in standard first aid - a study of accident prevention and personal injury.  Immediate first aid treatment of the injured will be studied and practiced through the application of bandages and splints, dressings, antiseptics and disinfectants.  American Red Cross Standard First Aid Certification will be the goal.

 

HPE 1321

Karate

1 Hour

This course is designed to offer training in the art of self-defense and the sport aspects of karate.  It includes instruction, demonstration, and practice of basic skills.  Class 2 hours.

 

HPE 1331

Advanced Karate

1 Hour

A continuation of HPE1321 with instruction in advanced skills.  Class 2 hours,

 

HPE 1341

Racquet Ball

1 Hour

This course includes study of the techniques and skills of racquetball necessary for the future teacher.  In teaching situation student will demonstrate knowledge of techniques, concepts and skill analysis.  Prerequisite:  Intermediate skill in activities included in course.  Class 2 hours.

 

HPE 2111

Varsity Sports

1 Hour

Credit will be received through participation in any of the following varsity sports: baseball, basketball, cheerleading, cross-country, football, golf, rodeo, soccer, softball, track, volleyball, wrestling.  Class daily.  Grading for this athletics course will be a CR or U instead of a letter grade.

 


24.25. HIS - HISTORY

HIS 1113

Great Ideas of Western Civilization 

3 Hours

This course introduces students to the intellectual foundations of Western Civilization and the study of the humanities. It surveys the major ideas that dominate Western Civilization from the ancient to the modern world, providing students with an outline of major historical movements of thought and an encounter with some of the principal works of philosophy, religion, literature, arts, and history that form the Western intellectual tradition. It provides students with the concepts needed to succeed in the courses that make up the humanities portion of the general education core curriculum.  CROSS-LISTED WITH BAL1113

 

HIS 2113

Western Civilization I

3 Hours

HIS 2113 Western Civilization I provides a complete overview of the history and culture of Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East from the beginnings of civilization in the 4th millennium, before Christ, to the decline of the Roman Empire and the beginning of Medieval Europe. The course focuses on the ideas, institutions, experiences, expressions, and accomplishments of Western civilization, including politics, social change, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy.

HIS 2123

Western Civilization II

3 Hours

HIS 2123 Western civilization provides a complete overview of the history and culture of Europe and its appendages from the beginning of Medieval Europe through the Renaissance and Enlightenment to the modern world. The course focuses on the ideas, institutions, experiences, expressions, and accomplishments of Western civilization, including politics, social change, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy.

HIS 2223

World History

3 Hours

HIS 2223 World History provides a complete overview of the history and culture of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas from prehistory to the present. The course focuses on the ideas, institutions, experiences, expressions, and accomplishments of world peoples, including politics, social change, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy.

 

HIS 2233

American Civilization I

3 Hours

American Civilization I provides a complete overview of early American history and culture. The course focus on the ideas, structures, and accomplishments of American civilization, including politics, social change and institutions, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy. American Indian and African-American contributions are included. American Civilization I begins during the age of exploration and discovery and proceeds through the colonial period to the age of the American Revolution, and the beginning of the New Nation.

 

HIS 2333

American Civilization II

3 Hours

American civilization provides a complete overview of modern American history and culture. The course focuses on the ideas, structures, and accomplishments of American civilization, including politics, social change, and institutions, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy. American Indian and African-American contributions are included. American Civilization begins during the 19th century antebellum period, and the Civil War followed by the Reconstruction Era, the Victorian Age, the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century, the two world wars of the 20th century, and changes in American society and culture from 1865 to the present.

            HIS 2483

Pre-1865 US History

3 Hours

Pre-1865 US History provides a complete overview of the history of America from colonization to the Civil War. The course focuses on the ideas, structures, and accomplishments of American civilization, including politics, social change and institutions, art music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy. The course examines colonization, Indian resistance to expansion, and the events preceding the Civil War.

HIS 2493

Post-1865 US History

3 Hours

Post-1865 US History provides a complete overview of the history of America from the Civil War on. The course focuses on the ideas, structures, and accomplishments of American civilization, including politics, social change and institutions, art music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy.

HIS 3013

American Indian History I

3 Hours

The dynamics of Indian-European encounters beginning in the early sixteenth century, the impact of Euro-American expansion and the displacement of Indians, Indian resistance, the creation of "Indian territory" and ultimate removal of Indian tribes west of the Mississippi river. Cross listed with AIS 3013.

 

HIS 3023

American Indian History II

3 Hours

The purpose of this course is to present a survey of American Indian history from the 1870s to the present, highlighting the processes by which Europeans and Euro-Americans dispossessed the various Indian nations of their land and identities, as well as the Indians’ efforts to adapt to rapidly changing circumstances. The dynamics of contact, conquest, interrelationship, accommodation, assimilation, and resistance is ongoing, and will be examined from both Indian and non-Indian perspectives (though far greater weight is given to the former). The means by which Indians have preserved their identities and cultures is the keynote to the course, rather than emphasizing the many tragic aspects of their histories..

 

HIS 3113

Oklahoma History

3 Hours

The American frontier in 1840, Indian resistance to American expansion, Indians in the Civil War, railroads and allotment of Indian land, Indians in World War I and II, resurgence of Indian identity and sovereignty in the 20th century. CROSS-LISTED WITH AIS 3023

 

 

HIS 3133

Colonial America

3 Hours

Oklahoma History is a course that fulfills the core curriculum history requirement as well as fulfills three credits for a BA in history or Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies. The course covers the original tribes in Oklahoma, European and American exploration, early settlement, the creation of Indian Territory, the creation of Oklahoma Territory, statehood, missionary work in Oklahoma, higher education in Oklahoma, the consequences of the industrial revolution and urbanization in Oklahoma, and Oklahoma politics. Students read primary source materials and form their own interpretations to explain the motives, goals, and achievements of the people of Oklahoma throughout time.

 

HIS 3213

New Nation United States

3 Hours

The New Nation: United States, 1789-1900 is a course that fulfills the core curriculum history requirement as well as fulfills three credits for a BA in history or Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies. This course examines four periods in American history: Westward Expansion, Antebellum America, the Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution and Urbanization in America. Students will read and learn about the creation of the U.S. government, the expansion of the United States, sectionalism in America, the causes and consequences of the Civil War, the impact of American growth on American Indians, the development of industry, and the consequences of industrialization, particularly the development of new classes, ideas, and cities. Students read primary source materials and form their own interpretations to explain the motives, goals, and achievements of Americans from 1789-1900.

 

HIS 3233

The American Experience of War

3 Hours

This course fulfills the Core Curriculum requirement for history at Bacone. War has always been a part of the American experience. In this course, students will examine the American experience of war, focusing on conflicts of the twentieth century, particularly World War II. American civilization was on trial during the greatest crisis the United States ever faced. Examining a variety of different sources, venues, and media, students will come to an understanding of World War II as a total phenomenon that affected all Americans whether abroad or at home. Course materials will include literature, historical narrative, oral history, autobiography and memoir, art, music, film, documentary, and newsreels.

 

HIS 3333

Poverty in America

3 Hours

Poverty has existed in America for centuries, and was a constant phenomenon in America before the Industrial Revolution, which accentuated poverty and created more hardship among America's poor. Poverty in 20th century America has been reduced in part by government intervention. Social philosophers have theorized about poverty and policy-makers have developed programs to address the causes of poverty and to alleviate its consequences. This course examines social theories and policies, the politics and economics of poverty, the poverty of special groups, and the changes in American poverty over time.

 

HIS 3453

Ancient Mediterranean History

3 Hours

This course examines the multi-faceted history of the ancient Mediterranean—the Egyptians, Hebrews, Hittites, Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans. The primary focus on the course will be on ancient Greco-Roman culture: the city-states of ancient Greece and the expansion of the Roman Empire. The ancient Mediterranean provided the foundation for most of the significant cultural and institutional ideas and structures today, in art, literature, philosophy, government, religion, drama, comedy, architecture, and science. The course considers the expansion of Christianity across the ancient Mediterranean during the first several centuries, anno domini.

 

HIS 3663

Christianity in a Postmodern World

3 Hours

This course explores the history and meaning of Christian thought and behavior focusing in particular on the 20th century when modern thought challenged traditional Christian beliefs and values. The course also focuses on the postmodern challenge of the 21st century to Christian beliefs and values, and the unique role American Indians have played in the history of Christianity.

 

HIS 3693

Special Topics in History

3 Hours

Students will be exposed to the processes of writing creative work and may study both traditional and experimental forms of literature.  Prerequisite: ENG 1113 and ENG 1213 Freshman Composition I and II and/or instructor permission.

 

HIS 4023

History of Science

3 Hours

This course is a survey of the history of science, particularly in Europe and America, beginning in the Ancient World with Greek and Roman scientists, continuing in the Medieval World with European and Islamic scientists, then focusing on the Scientific Revolution during the Renaissance and Enlightenment, the unique applied science in America, and the great scientific discoveries in the physical, life, social, behavioral, and mathematical sciences over the centuries. The relationship between Christianity and science is considered, as is the contributions of indigenous peoples to science.

 

HIS 4223

History of Exploration

3 Hours

History of Exploration is a course that fulfills the core curriculum history requirement as well as fulfills three credits for a BA in history or Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies. Humans are explorers: of life, thought, time, people, places. This course focuses on the latter, the exploration of place, but in the process students will find that explorers of place are also explorers of people, time, thought, life. History of Exploration covers the entirety of recorded human history, beginning with ancient exploration, the exploration of the New World, exploration of different continents, the exploration of the depths of the Earth, the exploration of the Earth’s solar system. Students read primary source materials and form their own interpretations to explain the motives, goals, and achievements of explorers throughout time.


24.26. ILS - INTERDISCIPLINARY LIBERAL STUDIES

ILS 1113

Perspectives on the Liberal Arts

3 Hours

Perspectives on the Liberal Arts provides students with an understanding of the place in and value of the liberal arts in human society.  It explores several different aspects including [1] the history of the liberal arts beginning in the Middle Ages and progressing through the great European centers of learning to the development of the liberal arts college in America; [2] a brief look at the diverse areas of study which make up the liberal arts and their defining commonalities, critical and creative thinking; [3] the philosophy and meaning of the liberal arts as they apply to the concept of “educated person;” and [4] the value of the liberal arts to 21st century American society—in understanding humanity, in worldview, in the prevalence of liberal arts colleges and curricula, and in the practical aspect of “What can I do with a B.A. in Liberal Arts?”

 

ILS 2113

Exploring Ideas and Concepts I

3 Hours

Designed as a true team-taught course, it will vary from term to term depending upon the subject selected and the approach of the instructors.  This master syllabus provides an umbrella organization for the course format, but will require input from the instructors in any given semester.

 

 ILS 2123

Exploring Ideas and Concepts II

3 Hours

Designed as a true team-taught course, it will vary from term to term depending upon the subject selected and the approach of the instructors.  This master syllabus provides an umbrella organization for the course format, but will require input from the instructors in any given semester.

 

 


24.27. LIT - LITERATURE

LIT 2013

Introduction to Literature

3 Hours

This course introduces the student to one or more of the various genres of literature -- drama, poetry, and prose – and to its forms, concepts and themes.  It focuses on evaluation, appreciation, and analysis thereof as reflected in written work.  Prerequisite: ENG 1213. 

 

LIT 2113

World Literature I

3 Hours

World Literature I introduces students to the classic works of world literature from ancient times through the Renaissance. Students interested in this class are encouraged to complete ENG1213 prior to enrolling. When offered, this course fulfills the LIT requirement of the Liberal Arts Guided Electives. Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 2123

World Literature II

3 Hours

Continuing LIT2113, his course examines the classics of world literature from the seventeenth century to contemporary society. Students interested in this class are encouraged to complete ENG1213 prior to enrolling. When offered, this course fulfills the LIT requirement of the Liberal Arts Guided Electives. Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 2133

Great Ideas in Phil Lit & Social Science: Psychology, Philosophy, Literature and Film

3 Hours

This course examines the intriguing relationships between literature, film and 20th century psychology and philosophy (notably Freud, Jung and and/or Existential Philosophy). Students will apply short readings in psychology and philosophy to works of fiction and films. CROSS-LISTED WITH BAL 2113

 

LIT 2213

Dramatic Literature

3 Hours

A survey of dramatic literature from classical Greece to the late twentieth century, with the purpose of understanding how to effectively read playscripts by understanding the conventions of dramatic writing; how and why playwrights incorporate great ideas into their work, including social, cultural, and historical influences; and how a script functions as a blueprint for a stage production. Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 2223

Shakespeare

3 Hours

By reading and watching examples of tragedy, comedy, and history plays, students explore Shakespeare’s transformation of the dramatic elements of plot, character, and language into dynamic, lively stage productions dealing with universal human themes. The class also looks at Renaissance English society and students study the impact of the social and cultural climate on Shakespeare and his profession. Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 2333

American Indian Literature

3 Hours

A reading, writing and discussion-intensive course centering on works written by, for, and about American Indians and Indigenous peoples. The course intends to hone the student's basic skills of literary analysis, critical thinking, while contextualizing themes within larger socio-economic settings specific to Indigenous peoples. Prerequisite: Completion of English 1213. CROSS-LISTED WITH AIS 2333

 

 

LIT 2543

Survey of English Literature I

3 Hours

This course introduces students to early English literature and the historical forces that shaped it through the Romantic period. When offered, this course fulfills the LIT requirement of the Guided Liberal Arts Electives. Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 2553

Survey of English Literature II

3 Hours

A continuation of LIT 2543, this course begins with selections from the late Romantic period and continues through contemporary society.  When offered, this course fulfills the LIT requirement of the Liberal Arts Guided Electives. Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 2633

Bible as Literature

3 Hours

The course will consist of reading, discussion, and written analysis of major literary selections from the Old and New Testaments. The Bible will be studied not as a religious document but as a source of ideas and style reflected in various works of world literature.  Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 2773

Survey of American Literature I

3 Hours

This course covers early American literature and literary movements from Colonial times through the Civil War. When offered, this course fulfills the LIT requirement of the Liberal Arts Guided Electives. Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 2883

Survey of American Literature II

3 Hours

The second of two courses surveying American literature, this course is designed to take students through an overview of literary production in the United States from roughly around 1865 to the present, American writers after Emily Dickinson to the present, with attention both to the historical context and to selected works chosen for close analysis.

 

LIT 3003  

Children’s Literature, Literacy, and Technology

3 Hours

This course examines the role and use of children’s literature and technology in the development of literacy skills in the kindergarten-elementary classroom.  Emphasis is given to creating a learning environment which supports the literacy process and includes learning centers and the use of quality children’s books in literacy development.  Cross-listed as REA 3003.

 

LIT 3113, 3123  

Genre Literature I and II

3 Hours

This repeatable course will specifically focus on types of literature rather than the traditional specific forms of literature, going beyond the fiction, poetry, drama delineation to the exploration of popular forms such as Detective Literature, Women’s Lit, Fantasy and Science Fiction.  It is designed to improve your ability to understand and analyze motivations and techniques of good writers in various genres. May be repeated.

 

 

LIT 3133

Great Ideas in Phil Lit & Social Science: History of Satire

3 Hours

Introduction to Satire, a 2500-year retrospective seeking to shed light on the present political/social/psychological landscape in terms of the best satirists of Western Civilization: Aristophanes, Juvenal, Rabelais, Voltaire, Swift, Twain, Orwell, Huxley and others.  Prerequisite: ENG 1213.  CROSS- LISTED WITH BAL 3123

 

LIT 3413  

SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH I

3 Hours

Special topics in English writing, rhetoric, literary criticism, history of the English language.

 

LIT 3423  

SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH II

3 Hours

Special topics in English writing, rhetoric, literary criticism, history of the English language.

 

LIT 3623

Ethnic American Literature

3 Hours

This course covers major works in the areas of African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and American Indian literatures. Students will examine issues of current interest regarding matters of race, nationality and gender and explore the ideas of who is an American and what it means to be an American.  When offered, this course fulfills the LIT requirement of the Liberal Arts Guided Electives.  Prerequisite: ENG 1213

 

LIT 3693

Short Story

3 Hours

This course is a study of the modern short story from its beginnings in the 19th century to its current form. Areas of focus will include its functions as art, as a reflector socio-cultural issues, and as a mode of personal expression and identity. Readings will include a variety of authors, notably key figures in the development of the form as well as contemporary voices. Prerequisite: ENG 1213.

 

 


24.28. LOG - LOGIC

LOGIC 3213

Introduction to Critical Thinking and Informal Logic

3 Hours

In this course students will be exposed to a variety of concepts from traditional and prepositional logic. The purpose of this course is to present students with a wide variety of reasoning techniques so that they will then be able to employ such techniques in critical thinking and will manifest itself in speaking, reading, and writing. This course combines traditional reasoning techniques (Syllogisms, truth tables, Mill's methods of inference, and deduction/induction) with classical philosophical work, which focus around argument and analysis. Prerequisites, successful completion of Speaking and Thinking Critically (SPC 1713) and English Composition II (ENG 1213).  BACONE CORE


24.29. MGT - MANAGEMENT

MGT 2223

Principles of Management

3 Hours

This course is an orientation to Bacone College facilities, campus protocol, available services, and management as a career. It is a course that explores the impact of management techniques on organizational efficiency and effectiveness. Topics include planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. 

 

MGT 2323

Human Relations in Business

3 Hours

Behavior oriented course designed to explore interpersonal relationships in the work environment. Prerequisite: MGT 2223.

 

 

 

MGT 3113

Small Business Administration

3 Hours

How to start a business, with emphasis on the assessment of business opportunities and on the development of operating plans. A sophisticated business plan is developed within task groups from concept through all elements of a professionally written business plan. Prerequisite: MGT 2223.

 

 

MGT 3213

Business Organization and Management

3 Hours

Organization theories and the role of managers as leaders. Planning and control systems, decision-making, and human considerations. Prerequisite: MGT 2223.

 

MGT 3253

Business Statistics

3 Hours

Application of statistical concepts to decision problems confronting organizations and individuals. Includes descriptive tools, probability concepts, sampling processes, statistical inference, regression, and nonparametric procedures. Prerequisite of junior classification. Prerequisite: MTH 1513

 

MGT 3313

Production and Operations Management

3 Hours

Operations of production plants. Methods analysis and work measurements, inventory control, quality control, facilities layout, machines, and maintenance. Prerequisite: MGT 2223; MGT 3253

 

MGT 3323

Human Resource Management

3 Hours

Principles and procedures relating to human resources management, including staffing, appraisal, training, compensation, and other programs for business and other organizations. Prerequisite: MGT 2223.

 

MGT 3333

Labor Relations Management

3 Hours

Managing employment relations and work conditions. Emphasis on negotiating, administering labor agreements, and impact of collective bargaining on managerial practices. Prerequisite: MGT 2223.

 

MGT 3343

Quality Control Management

3 Hours

Introduces the basic concepts and models used in quality management. Emphasis is placed on the organizational and behavioral dimensions of a quality management program. Prerequisite: MGT 2223.

 

MGT 4113

Organizational Behavior and Leadership Theory

3 Hours

Emphasis is on leadership and motivations as directive functions of management that are instrumental for achieving high quality performance and organization member satisfaction. Techniques for enhancing one’s individual leadership skills are utilized. Prerequisite: MGT 2223. Must be junior/senior standing.

 

MGT 4203

Change Management

3 Hours

The course emphasis is on identifying the need for change, designing change, deploying change and
evaluating the impact of change.

 

 MGT 4303

Strategic Planning

3 Hours

This course emphasizes strategic planning processes and focuses on setting strategic objectives and developing strategies for implementing those objectives. The course teaches students the building blocks of strategic planning and introduces students to the contested theories of how to develop and implement plans.

 

MGT 4313

International Management

3 Hours

Managerial decision making for planning organizing, and controlling the functions, operations, and resources of multi-national corporations. Prerequisite: MGT 2223.

 

MGT 4993,-6

Business Administration Internship

3-6 Hours

Professional experience in a business environment for GPA qualified students.

 


24.30. MKT - MARKETING

MKT 2283

Principles of Marketing

3 Hours

An introduction to marketing function of a business organization, analysis of environmental factors influencing marketing decisions with special regard to types of markets and market opportunities; primary emphasis on study of managerial factors and processes used to plan and control marketing action.

 

MKT 2513

Buyer Behavior

3 Hours

Theory and research on explaining and predicting consumer and organizational buying behavior.  Course examines concepts that have implications for marketing management decisions.  Prerequisite:  MKT 2283.

 

MKT 3113

Marketing Research

3 Hours

Examines marketing research methods and techniques used in the collection and interpretation of primary and secondary data. Hands-on experience is gained through participation in one or more research projects. Prerequisite: MKT 2283.

 

 

MKT 3213

Marketing Channels

3 Hours

Theoretical concepts of marketing channel (distribution) structure and management and their practical applications. Prerequisite: MKT 2283.

 

MKT 3313

Retailing Management and Promotion

3 Hours

Management and operation of retail firms. Emphasis on location analysis, pricing, inventory control, merchandising and promotion. Prerequisite: MKT2283.

 

 

MKT 3413

Sales Management

3 Hours

Theory, principles, and practices of sales force administration for manufacturing, wholesaling, and service enterprises. Topics include recruiting, training, compensation, and performance appraisal. Prerequisite: MKT2283.

 

MKT 3513

Strategic Marketing Management

3 Hours

Development, implementation, and control of the marketing plan. Short and long run perspectives are considered equally important. Prerequisite: MKT2283.

 

MKT 4113

Marketing Management

3 Hours

A managerial approach to the study of such key decision areas as advertising, distribution, pricing and product development as well as other concepts and activities that facilitate exchange and build relationships between buyers and sellers in the environments of business and non-business organizations. Prerequisite: MKT2283.

MKT 4213

Business-to-Business Marketing

3 Hours

Focuses upon the scope and nature of marketing in an industrial or business-to-business context.  Prerequisite:  MKT2283.

 

MKT 4313

Advertising Management

3 Hours

Evaluation of elements for the effective development, implementation, and management of advertising campaigns.  Experience in making decisions will be gained via cases, campaign development exercises, and/or computer simulation.  Prerequisite:  MKT2283.

 

MKT 4413

Purchasing Policies and Procedures

3 Hours

Purchase of materials, supplies, and equipment for industry, government, and other institutions.  Organization for purchasing, internal requisitioning, and stock control.  Prerequisite:  MKT 2283.

 

MKT 4496

Professional Practice Internship in Marketing

6 Hours

Professional experience in a business environment for qualified students.

 

MKT 4513

International Marketing

3 Hours

This course is designed to create an understanding of the global marketing environment and develop marketing strategies across national boundaries.  The political, economic, and cultural variables, which influence such strategies, are identified.  Recent cross-cultural research and real world cases clarify concepts and their applications. Elementary Algebra is an introductory course for students with little or no background in algebra.  Topics include signed numbers, evaluation of algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, and graphing points and lines.  Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Math or appropriate score on placement test.  This course carries no credit toward graduation.

 


24.31. MTH - MATHEMATICS

MTH 0223

Intermediate Algebra

3 Hours

Intermediate Algebra is designed as a refresher course in basic algebra skills. Topics include graphing points, lines, and inequalities; factoring; rational expressions; ratios, proportions, and percentages; exponents and radicals; solving quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square, and the quadratic formula; logarithms, and systems of equations. Intermediate Algebra is the high school equivalency course mandated by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. The student earns no credit toward graduation, although the grade will affect the student's GPA. To advance to the next course, the student must earn at least a grade of "C". 

 

MTH 1493

Mathematical Structures

3 Hours

This course is a study of the fundamental structure of mathematics for non-mathematics majors.  Topics include:  sets and problem solving, logic, numeration systems, number theory, and the real numbers, equations, inequalities, functions and graphs, geometry, probability, mathematical systems and matrices, and statistics.  Prerequisites: Prerequisite: MTH 0223 or a score of 22 or above on the math portion of the ACT exam.  BACONE CORE

 

 

MTH 1513

College Algebra

3 Hours

Advanced topics in quadratic equations, graphics, functions, and their graphs.  Polynomial and rational functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MTH 0223 or a score of 22 or above on the math portion of the ACT exam.  BACONE CORE

 

MTH 1713

Fundamentals of Geometry

3 Hours

The basic objective of this course is to show students how to apply the principles of geometry and how to recognize geometry’s relevance to the real world.  Prerequisite:  MTH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C”.

 

MTH 1813

Plane Trigonometry

3 Hours

This course covers functions of angles, logarithms, applications to triangles, identities and equations.  Prerequisite: MTH1513 or a good high school mathematics background and permission of the instructor. 

 

MTH 1914

Plane Analytic Geometry

4 Hours

An analytic study of points, lines, and curves in the plane, including a study of plotting, and properties of the point, straight line, parabola, circle, eclipse, hyperbola, degenerate conics and polar coordinates, translation and rotation of axis, higher plane curves and parametric equations.  Prerequisite: MTH1813 or a good high school mathematics background and permission of the instructor. 

 

MTH 2003

Math Concepts I

3 Hours

This course covers logic, sets and counting, probability, statistics, and geometry.  Prerequisite:  MTH 1513

 

 

 

MTH 2135

Differential Calculus

5 Hours

Differentiation and problems in its simpler applications.  Prerequisite: MTH1914 or a good high school mathematics background and permission of the instructor. 

 

MTH 2145

Integral Calculus

5 Hours

Continuation of MTH2135.  Integration and its simpler applications.  Prerequisite:  MTH2135.

 

MTH 2213

Linear Algebra

3 Hours

Finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, solutions of linear systems.  Prerequisite: MTH1914.

 

MTH 3003

Math Concepts II

3 Hours

This course covers geometry, matrices, and linear programming, exponential and logarithmic functions, dimensional analysis, and an introduction to calculus.  Prerequisite:  MTH2003.


24.32. MDI - MEDICAL IMAGING

MDI 3113

Principles of Medical Imaging Sciences

3 Hours

An expanded and detailed overview of the underlying principles of medical imaging sciences and associated modalities, including historical developments of the profession

 

 

MDI 3213

Digital Imaging Principles

3 Hours

An introduction to basic principles of digital imaging with emphasis on digital radiography, computed radiography, digital fluoroscopy, Picture Archiving and Communication systems (PACS), Radiology Information System (RIS), Hospital Information System (HIS) and associated equipment. Prerequisite: MDI 3113

 

MDI 3323

Advanced Radiobiology and Radiation Protection

3 Hours

A detailed study of the effects of ionizing radiation on human at the atomic, molecular, cellular, tissue, systemic, and organismic levels, with emphasis on radiation protection principles and practice. MDI 3113

 

MDI 3413

Quality Management in Health Care

3 Hours

A study of the concepts of quality control, quality assurance, and total quality management in medical imaging and healthcare institutions. Course will emphasis techniques and guidelines for designing, implementing, evaluating, and improving quality management practices in healthcare and medical imaging departments.

 

MDI 4113

Public Health Services in Contemporary Society

3 Hours

A study of the history and development of public health services, with emphasis on the regulation, financing, supply, demand, and the methods of delivering health services in contemporary society.

 

MDI 4123

Medical Imaging Administration and Supervision

3 Hours

A study of the principles of organization, management, and leadership, as they pertain to the administration and supervision of a medical imaging department. Prerequisite: MDI 3113

 

MDI 4213

Clinical Instruction and Mentoring

3 Hours

An introduction to the principles and practice of clinical education through discussion of relevant educational philosophies. Purpose is to stimulate participants' involvement in the teaching, supervising and mentoring of medical imaging students in a clinical environment.

 

 

 

 

MDI 4222

Medical Imaging Seminar

2 Hours

A course that provides a forum for the discussion, exploration and analysis of current issues and trends in the medical imaging profession.  Seminar discussions encompass diagnostic, therapeutic, clinical education, administrative, management, supervisory and other issues.  Prerequisite:  MDI 3113 and MDI 4113

 

MDI 4313

Introduction to Research

3 Hours

An introduction to basic quantitative and qualitative research design and methods used to investigate phenomena in medical imaging and allied health professions. Prerequisite: MDI 3113.

 

MDI 4323

Special Studies in Medical Imaging

3 Hours

A course that gives participants the opportunity to investigate a phenomenon or conduct a detailed literature survey on a given topic or area of interest in the medical imaging and allied health professions.  Prerequisite: MDI 4313

 

MDI 4324

Advanced Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology

4 Hours

A study of regular and cross-sectional anatomy, in addition to normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected body systems

 

MDI 4403

Emergency Preparedness and Crisis Management

3 Hours

A course that provides a forum for discussing ways to prepare emergencies and how to respond and manage crisis situations. The course also discusses the challenges that confront health services organizations, public/private officials, and community leaders as they prepare in advance to provide effective responses to unfolding emergency crisis.

 


24.33. ASL/CHE/CRK/FRC/SPA - MODERN LANGUAGE

ASL 1003

American Sign Language I

3 Hours

Through an immersion approach, students learn the receptive and expressive manual communication skills of American-born Deaf persons.  Students acquire conversational skills through targeted grammar, syntax, vocabulary, nonverbal communication and cultural/social understanding of Deafness.  Students who succeed in this class will reach from novice to high novice conversational skill level by the end of the semester; recommended for all SOE students.

 

ASL 1013

American Sign Language II

3 Hours

Students continue the work begun in ASL1003.  Students who succeed in this class will reach high novice conversational skill level by the end of the semester.  Prerequisite:  ASL1003 or demonstration of appropriate skills to instructor.

 

CHE 1113

Elementary Cherokee I

3 Hours

Elementary Cherokee is a basic language course that introduces students to Cherokee phonology, morphology, and syntax with attention given to the syllabary as well as the spoken language. Elementary Cherokee I acquaints students with basic vocabulary, common phrases, and modern idioms. The course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty.   CROSS-LISTED AS AIS1133.        

 

CHE 1123

Elementary Cherokee II

3 Hours

A continuation of CHE1113, this course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty.  PREREQUISITE:  CHE1113 or demonstration of appropriate skills to instructor.

 

CRK 1113

Elementary CREEK I

3 Hours

Elementary Creek I is a basic language course which introduces students to Muskogee phonology, morphology, and syntax with attention to the spoken language.  Elementary Creek I acquaints the student with basic vocabulary, common phrases, and modern idioms. The course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty.

 

 

 

CRK 1123

Elementary Creek II

3 Hours

A continuation of CRK1113, this course is offered when warranted by student interest and availability of faculty.  PREREQUISITE:  CRK1113 or demonstration of appropriate skills to instructor.

 

FRC 1113

Elementary French I

3 Hours

Students learn introductory French conversational skills.  The course focuses on developing the ear, pronunciation, essential vocabulary and useful phrases necessary for successful students to reach novice conversation level by the end of the semester.  Students learn minimal reading skills, although students are encouraged to work on reading independently as an aid to learning the language more quickly.  The course is offered based on student interest and availability of faculty.

 

FRC 1223

Elementary French II

3 Hours

This course continues the work started in FRC1113.  Students who succeed in the class will reach high novice conversation level by the end of the semester.  The course is offered based on student interest and availability of faculty.

 

SPA 1113

Elementary Spanish I

3 Hours

Students learn introductory Spanish conversational skills.  The course focuses on developing the ear, pronunciation, essential vocabulary and useful phrases necessary for successful students to reach novice conversation level by the end of the semester.  Students learn minimal reading skills, although students are encouraged to work on reading independently as an aid to learning the language more quickly.  This course is recommended for Criminal Justice majors.

 

 

 

SPA 1223

Elementary Spanish II

3 Hours

This course continues the work started in SPA1113.  Students who succeed in the class will reach high novice conversation level by the end of the semester.  This course is recommended for Criminal Justice majors.


24.34. MUS - MUSIC

MUS 1103

Music Appreciation

3 Hours

Students gain background knowledge necessary to understand “art” music through listening, lecture, and research.  Class includes a 1-hour listening lab each week.

 

MUS 1112

Fundamentals of Music

2 Hours

Notation and terminology, major and minor modes, intervals and chord construction.  Not to be taken by students with credit in high school music theory or equivalent competence. Offered when warranted by student interest.

 

MUS 1122

Piano Class

2 Hours

Beginning instruction in piano.  A fundamental study of the piano keyboard, piano technique, music reading in treble and bass clefs, and basic music theory.  To be taken by students with no previous piano study.  Class 2 hours and 3 hour practice lab.  Offered when warranted by student interest. 

 

MUS 1131

Bacone Band

1 Hour

Offers a student with previous musical instrument training opportunities to play a variety of music at various performance activities on and off campus. 

 

MUS 1141

Bacone Choir

1 Hour

Students gain experience in a vocal music ensemble.  Experience is helpful, but not mandatory.  The Bacone Choir performs several times each semester during Bacone Hour and occasionally at off-campus sites in the immediate Muskogee area.   Class meets two hours weekly.   May be repeated for credit.  Some scholarship funding may be available for new students.  Interested prospective students should contact Admissions for further information.

 

 

 

MUS 1153

Musical Production

3 Hours

An introduction to the staged musical production, the staging process, and stage direction.  Class 3 hours, extensive labs. Offered when warranted by student interest.

 

MUS 1371-1372

Applied Piano or Voice

1-2 Hours

One thirty-minute private lesson per week with 5 hours practice will earn 1 semester hour credit.  Two 30-minute private lessons per week or one 60-minute private lesson per week with 10 hours practice will earn 2 semester hours credit.  Applied music may be repeated for a total of 6 hours in voice or piano. Semester performance examinations for each student enrolled in applied music required. By permission of instructor only. Offered when warranted by student interest. 

 

 

 


24.35. NUR - NURSING

NUR 1102

Pharmacology/Dosage Calc.

2 Hours

A non-clinical course that introduces an understanding of basic principles and concepts of pharmacology. Nursing ethics and legal issues in relation to pharmacology is also taught. This course may be completed prior to admission to the nursing program. Prerequisite/co-requisite: BIO 2133 and BIO 2144.  Classroom 2 hours/week.

 

 

 NUR 1112

Nursing Skills & Techniques

2 Hours

A non-clinical course providing basic skills competencies, including medication administration and comprehensive physical assessment. Students are guided in acquiring basic knowledge and skills involved in the nursing process, in addition to client interviewing techniques. Attention is also given to the assessment of selected physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual processes of healthy adults. Skills and techniques are learned and practiced in a laboratory setting and at varying clinical facilities.  Laboratory: 6 hours/week.

 

 NUR 1113

Fundamentals of Nursing

3 Hours

A clinical course providing an introduction to healthcare, specifically nursing, and introduces the student to care of the client as an individual, as well as in relation to family, culture, and community. Primary focus is given to health promotion and maintenance. Principles of client education and professional and therapeutic communication are emphasized. With a focus on the nurse as a provider of care, the student establishes nurse-client relationships, and begins to apply the nursing process utilizing evidence-based practice. The operational framework of the program is introduced. This course is the foundation of all nursing courses and is, therefore, a prerequisite for them. Prerequisite: admission to Nursing Program, BIO 2133. Classroom 2.5 hours/week; Clinical 0.5 hours/week.

 

NUR 1222

Med/Surg Nursing Clinical

2 Hours

A clinical course focusing on the acquisition of nursing theory and skills required to provide nursing care to adult clients who are experiencing common acute and chronic disease processes. Attention is given to the pathophysiology of specific disease processes. In a variety of acute care and community settings, students integrate theory with practice as they perform system specific assessments, teach clients and families, and manage client care using evidence-based nursing interventions and complex psychomotor skills competencies. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in BIO 2122, BIO 2133, BIO 2144, NUR 1102, NUR 1113, and NUR 1112. Additional fees are associated with this course. Offered in spring semester, second semester of nursing curriculum. Classroom 4 hours/week; Clinical 9 hours/week.

 

NUR 1224

Medical/Surgical Nursing Care

4 Hours

Utilizing the nursing process, this course focuses on the medical/surgical component of nursing to include both acute and chronic disease processes of the adult client. The student will be introduced to care of the client undergoing surgery and study developmental aspects of the middle years. Concepts and skills learned in previous and concurrent courses are applied in a variety of clinical settings. In order to progress to level II, a math proficiency test will be administered and a grade of 95% or better must be achieved. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in BIO 2133, BIO 2144, and NUR 1213. Spring semester, second sequential course for CAPN students. Additional fees are associated with this course. 64 total classroom hours, 45 total clinical hours. (CAPN students only).

 

 

 

NUR 2021

Nursing Care of Children Clinical

1 Hour

Clinical activities emphasize the application of theory to practice in a variety of communities and acute care settings involving children.

 

NUR 2023

Nursing Care of Children

3 Hours

Applying a child centered approach, this course focuses on health promotion, acute and chronic health conditions, and rehabilitative needs of children. Emphasis is placed on developmental, physiological, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual care of the child within the family unit. Using the nursing process, strategies are formulated for promoting and maintaining optimal functioning of the and for enhancing the strengths of children.

 

NUR 2031

Nursing Care of the Family Clinical

1 Hour

A clinical course focusing on the care of the family experiencing childbearing and childrearing. Growth and development, health promotion and maintenance, and health problems of the family are emphasized. Students practice the roles of manager of care, provider of care, and member within the discipline of healthcare in a variety of culturally-diverse acute care and community settings. Emphasis is placed on individualizing nursing care plans to meet the client’s/family’s goals. Nursing process continues to be built upon from previous semesters. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PSY 1113, BIO 2324, NUR 1227/1225. Additional fees are associated with this course. Offered in fall semester, third semester of nursing curriculum. Classroom 4 hours/week; Clinical 9 hours/week.

 

NUR 2033

Nursing Care of the Family

3 Hours

Applying a family centered approach this course focuses on health promotion, acute and chronic health conditions, and rehabilitative needs of children. Emphasis is placed on developmental, physiological, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual care of the child within the family unit. Using the nursing process, strategies are formulated for promoting and maintaining optimal functioning of the child-family unit and for enhancing the strengths of the family unit.

 

NUR 2041

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Clinical

1 Hour

This course provides clinical experience for nursing intervention development for promoting, maintaining, and restoring mental health across the lifespan integrating principles of professional relationships, therapeutic communication, and concepts of psychopathology.

 

NUR 2042

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Care

2 Hours

A clinical course focusing on the application of psychiatric and mental health concepts used when caring for clients with diagnosed mental health/psychiatric needs. Principles of therapeutic communication are emphasized. Clinical settings include acute, in-patient, and community-based mental health facilities. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in NUR 2037. Offered in spring semester (first 5 weeks), fourth semester of nursing curriculum. Classroom 4 hours/week; Clinical 12 hours/week.

 

NUR 2142

Advanced Med/Surg Nursing Care Clinical

2 Hours

Requires students to apply knowledge and skills to the care of adult patients in a simulated laboratory and acute care environments experiencing needs resulting from complex multisystem disruptions. Students apply the nursing process and utilize information literacy skills to achieve deliberative and competent decision-making that is grounded in evidence based practice to achieve best practice outcomes. Emphasis will be placed on prioritization of care through collaboration with other members of the health care team, patients and their families.

 

 

NUR 2144

Advanced Medical-Surgical Nursing Care

4 Hours

A clinical course placing emphasis on nursing care of adult clients with acute, complex, and/or multi-system disorders. The application of pathophysiology is continued. Additionally, the role of nursing in disasters is introduced. Planning nursing care for a group of medical/surgical clients is emphasized, while integrating the nursing process, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Clinical focus also includes time management, leadership skills, and delegation. Clinical settings include acute and critical care medical/surgical units, rehabilitation units, and step-down units. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in NUR 2037. Offered in spring semester (final 10 weeks), fourth semester of nursing curriculum. Classroom 5 hours/week; Clinical 12 hours/week.

 

NUR 2242

Nursing Strategies for Progressive Leadership Capstone

2 Hours

This course builds on the previous learning related to holistic patient care for adults, older adults, and critically ill patients with complex healthcare needs. Students engage in self-directed study to enhance their physical assessment skills. Students demonstrate critical thinking in the development and implementation of comprehensive plans of care. Students integrate principles of advocacy, collaboration, coordination and evidence-based care to meet the complex needs of clients during clinical experiences.

*Native/Non-Native Pathway

 

.NUR 2243

Nursing Strategies for Progressive Leadership

3 Hours

This course focuses on the principles of management and leadership in the delivery of healthcare. A historical overview of leadership and management theories assists the student in understanding legal and ethical implications of the role of professional nurse in regard to client care, staffing, budgeting, quality improvement, and other issues. Management concepts and skills are stressed to promote individual and group satisfaction within the work environment. Additionally, content includes current issues and trends in nursing leadership and management and the contribution of the professional nurse to today’s society.

*Native/Non-Native Pathway

 

NUR 3003

Health Care Community and Nursing Informatics

3 Hours

Course introduces the knowledge and skills necessary for the use of information technology by nurses in relation to patient care, the education of nurses, and clients and health care facility administration. Content includes awareness of legal and ethical issues associated with the use of nursing informatics, as well as exploring information technology related to clinical bedside practice, inpatient and outpatient monitoring and documentation, accessing research findings; education health promotion; patient teaching, and ergonomics. Native/ Non-Native pathway. 

 

NUR 3103

Theories and Concepts in Professional Nursing

3 Hours

The philosophy and operational framework of the nursing program are introduced. Historical and theoretical foundations of professional nursing are presented. Current economic, technological, and legal influences on nursing and health care are analyzed. Selected concepts including critical thinking, effective communication, interdisciplinary relationships, role identity, and problem solving methods are explored. Students are assisted to obtain college credit for prior nursing experiences by developing a portfolio to document attainment of clinical objectives in selected BSN courses. Classroom 4 hours/week for 7 weeks; 17 hours outside class time; first course in the BSN sequence.  *Native/ Non-Native pathway.

 

NUR 3183

Transcultural Nursing and Health Care

3 Hours

This course is designed to promote effective nursing and health care to clients from other cultures and clients with characteristics that differ from the dominant American culture. Includes study of international nursing issues and their impact on clinical nursing practice. A practical experience with another culture or group of persons who differ significantly from those of the dominant culture is provided. Classroom 4 hours/week and clinical 4 hours/week for 6 weeks; second course in the BSN sequence. *Native/Non-Native pathway.

 

NUR 3243

Health Assessment and Promotion

3 Hours

This course provides a comprehensive knowledge base for health assessment skills and health promotion methodologies. Includes laboratory practice of physical assessment skills and body systems review of clients across the lifespan. Documentation and interpretation of findings and health promotion opportunities are discussed. Classroom 3 hours/week and laboratory 1 hour/week for 7 weeks; 17 hours outside class time; third course in the BSN sequence.

Native/ Non-Native pathway.

 

NUR 3303

Nursing Ethics

3 Hours

A non-clinical course focusing on current trends, issues, and controversies in the nursing profession. Economic, legal, ethical, and legislative issues as well as professional roles and responsibilities are addressed. Transition from the student nurse to the graduate nurse and career development are also explored. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in NUR 2037. Corequisites: NUR 2043 and NUR 2047. Offered in spring semester, fourth semester of nursing curriculum. Classroom 2 hours/week.

 

NUR 4173

Nursing Research

3 Hours

A non-clinical course introducing fundamental concepts of the research process. The scientific method of problem solving is explored. Emphasis is given to critical analysis and application of research in clinical nursing practice. The course is designed to enhance critical thinking skills and enable the student to become a knowledgeable consumer of research. Classroom 4 hours/week for 6 weeks; 24 hours outside class time; fifth course in the BSN sequence. *Native/Non-Native pathway.

 

NUR 4385

Community Health Nursing

5 Hours

The focus of this course is the community as client. The nurse’s role in health promotion in local, state, national, and international environments is studied. Epidemiology, population needs, and models of health care delivery are considered. Students plan and implement a community health clinical project for another culture or ethnic group as the clinical practicum for this course. Classroom 4 hours/week and clinical 12 hours/week for 4 weeks; 14 hours outside class time; seventh course in the BSN sequence.

Native/Non-Native pathway.

 

NUR 4484

Leadership and Management Practice in Health-Care Organizations

4 Hours

Theories and principles related to nursing leadership and client care management across the spectrum of nursing practice settings are considered. Organizational structure and roles, basic management tools, and financial management are studied in relation to nursing practice and the delivery of health care. Classroom 4 hours/week and clinical 12 hours/week for 4 weeks; 14 hours outside class time; ninth course in the BSN sequence. Native/Non-Native pathway.

               


24.36. PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSC 2013

American Government

3 Hours

A study of the origin, structure and function of the United States Government.  Special attention will be given to basic concepts, political beliefs, political processes, and the Constitution and its features.

 

PSC 2231-2253

Special Studies in Political Science

1-3 Hours

A variety of course offerings providing the opportunity for the student to study designated topics and develop skills in political thought and process.  Class 1 to 3 hours. Offered when warranted by student interest.

 

 

PSC 3233

American Political Thought

3 Hours

American Political Thought is a course that fulfills the Liberal Arts Guided Elective requirements for the Associates and Bachelor’s degrees at Bacone. The course focuses less on structures and institutions than ideas, in particular the ideas of covenant, social compact, sovereignty, freedom, federalism, civil rights, civic responsibility, liberty, order, republicanism conservatism, liberalism, and democracy, all of which have formed the foundation for the American political system over the course of 400 years. The cornerstone of the course is in-depth analyses of the thought of the English political philosophers John Locke and Thomas Hobbes and the American political thinkers Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison.

 

PSC 3333

The American Presidency

3 Hours

This course fulfills the guided liberal arts elective requirement at Bacone. The course examines the historical and contemporary roles of the President of the United States as the executive charged with enforcing the laws as commander in chief of the United States, and as originator of public policy and law.

 

PSC 3563

Modernization

3 Hours

This course is an interdisciplinary, multicultural course that introduces Bacone students to historical, social scientific, and behavioral scientific theories and methods. Modernization theory emerged after World War II to explain changing Third World economies, governments, institutions, and behavior. The theory has been successfully adapted to historical inquiry, and is a useful tool to examine the impact of science, technology, and industrialization on traditional societies. The course examines the modernizing changes on the United States and Europe and the impact of modernization on traditional societies and developing countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The course examines the impact of modernization upon Christianity and American Indians

 

 


24.37. PED - PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

PED 1002

Introduction to Education

2 Hours

This course is an orientation to the teaching profession as explained from a Christian world view.  Students will study selected issues and trends in modern education, a study which will continue into the next required course in the School of Education: PED 3003 – Foundations of Education.  Students will write a first version of their philosophy of education, a required component in the professional portfolio that is assembled throughout the student’s tenure at Bacone.  Students who have not already taken the Learning Styles Inventory will take it during this class.  Students will be encouraged to begin the process of admission to the Teacher Education Program by obtaining an OSBI records check, and by preparing for the OGET, an examination required for Oklahoma teacher certification.  There is no prerequisite for this class. 

 

PED 1012

OGET Preparation

2 Hours

The purpose of this course is to prepare teacher candidates for the Oklahoma General Education Test (OGET). The OGET is designed to identify those teacher candidates who have demonstrated the level of general education knowledge and skills required for entry-level teachers in the state of Oklahoma. The OGET is used to measure teacher candidate’s knowledge of general education and skills, including critical thinking, computation and communication. This course will include test taking skills. Candidates will learn test-taking skills along with a review of content knowledge expected for this exam. (Elective)

Prerequisite: PED 1002 Introduction to Education.

 

PED 2002

Educational Technology

2 Hours

This course provides students with knowledge of current technology available for use in the classroom and with strategies for integrating technology across the curriculum, regardless of teaching field. Special attention will be given to the Microsoft Office Suite, software evaluation, web page design, Internet protocol and Internet searching as it applies to educational research.

Prerequisite: PED 1002 Introduction to Education.

 

PED 2102

Legal Issues in Education

2 Hours

This course introduces the teacher candidate to the law and its application and interpretation as it applies to teachers, students, schools, coaches, and education. Prerequisite: PED 1002 Introduction to Education

 

PED 2103

  Social Studies Survey I for Teacher Education

 3 Hours

This course will examine history and how historians study the past to understand their place in time and location. A knowledge base of historical content will be drawn from United State History providing the basis for which candidates develop historical understanding and competence in ways of historical thinking to also include geographical, economical, governmental, and civic understandings.   Candidates will evaluate evidence, develop comparative and causal historical understanding, and competence in ways of historical thinking, examine the spatial contexts of people, places, and environments, provide knowledge of Earth’s physical and human systems and the interdependency of living things, and physical environments, provide information about how people attempt to satisfy their wants and helps them employ logical reasoning in thinking about economic issues. In addition, candidates will develop knowledge and understanding of civics and government in order to provide understand of the role of informed, responsible participation in political life by competent citizens committed to the fundamental values and principles of American Constitutional democracy.

 

PED 2203

  Social Studies Survey II for Teacher Education

 3 Hours

This course will examine history and how historians study the past to understand their place in time and location. A knowledge base of historical content will be drawn from World History providing the basis for which candidates develop historical understanding and competence in ways of historical thinking to include geographical, economical, and governmental understandings.   Candidates will evaluate evidence, develop comparative and causal historical understanding, and competence in various ways of historical thinking.

 

PED 2431

Special Studies/Education Club

1 Hour

The purpose of this organization is to facilitate communication and support among students interested in the teaching profession. The goal is to sponsor various professional activities and social events so that students will be able to share ideas about teaching and interact with professionals in the field. Also, the club will provide opportunities for participation in educational and volunteer work on campus and in the surrounding community. Elective, may be used twice for a total of 2 credits.

 

PED 2603

Human Growth and Development

3 Hours

This course is a study of the human development from conception through adolescence.  Emphasis is placed upon the developmental phases of children and adolescents and the interrelationships among various aspects of development  physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and spiritual  and emphasizing the many factors influencing development.   Prerequisite:  PED 1002. PASS-PORT Portfolio required.

 

PED 3003

Foundations of Education

3 Hours

This course examines teaching as a profession and views education from sociological, organizational, historical, philosophical, and program development perspectives. In addition to regular course assignments, students enrolled in this course will work with the Chair of the Department of Teacher Education to fulfill requirements for admission into Bacone’s School of Education. Prerequisite: PED 1002 Introduction to Education.

 

PED 3103

Educational Psychology

3 Hours

This course provides an overview of the historical and current research and theories of effective teaching and learning in Preschool through grade 12. A major focus will be relating theory to practice, constructing appropriate lesson plans, developing an understanding of authentic assessment, student diversity and reflective practice. Prerequisites: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

PED 3113

Multicultural Education

3 Hours

This course introduces the major goals, principles, and concepts of multicultural education with emphasis on clarifying key concepts and terminology, discovering multiple perspectives in culture and history, understanding cultural and individual differences in teaching and learning, and becoming a multicultural teacher. Prerequisite: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

 

PED 3202

HPE for the Elementary Teacher

2 Hours

This course examines methods and curricula HPE designed to help teachers implement and integrate health and physical education within the elementary classroom. Emphasis is given to the development of the knowledge, skills, and techniques involved in motor learning, games, and activities used in PK-8 grades appropriated to growth and development. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, 2.5 GPA,  PASS-PORT Portfolio and Criminal History required.

 

 

 

PED 3203

Education of the Exceptional Child

3 Hours

This course is a general introduction to the characteristics of exceptional learners and their education. Emphasis will be placed on classroom practices, as well as the psychological, sociological, and medical aspects of disabilities and giftedness. Prerequisite: Prerequisite:  All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

PED 3303

Classroom/Behavior Management

3 Hours

This course focuses on how to create a learning environment in the classroom that encourages positive social interaction, self-motivation, and active engagement in meaningful and purposeful learning. Prerequisites All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

PED 4202

Educational Seminar

2 Hours

Student Teaching is designed to provide opportunities for teacher candidates to develop and demonstrate their competency as a professional educator in the actual classroom (grades 1-3) working with an experienced mentor teacher and college supervisor. Students must enroll in ELE 4115, ELE 4215 and PED 4202 concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bacone Teacher Education Program. All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

 

PED 4253

Adolescent Psychology

3 Hours

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive developmental changes that occur during adolescence.  A particular emphasis will be placed on individual aspects of development, the contexts and social spheres that shape that development and behavioral problems of adolescence that result from bio-psychosocial interactions in development.  Patterns of continuity and transitions of adolescence in both group and individual patterns of development will also be addressed. Prerequisite: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above and 2.75 GPA

 


24.38. PSY - PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 1113

Introduction to Psychology

3 Hours

An introductory course designed to develop an understanding of the basic principles underlying human behavior.  The subject matter, methods, and techniques of scientific psychology are presented.  Emphasis is placed on heredity, environment abilities, learning, remembering, perception, observation, thinking, motivation, emotions and the basis of personality formation and development. 

 

PSY 1123

Psychology of Personal Adjustment

3 Hours

Studied from the viewpoint of personal needs, social relationships, individual differences and characteristics of satisfactory adjustment.  Factors involved in social vocations, school, family and marriage adjustment will be analyzed and considered.  Class 3 hours.

 

 

PSY 1283

Child Development (Birth-8 Years)

3 Hours

To present a general survey of child growth and development solidly based on psychological and social theories and instructive in the practical aspects of child development.  The study of children, birth-8 years, and their relationship with others, with emphasis on meeting fundamental needs in daily living.  Specific areas to be covered are: physical, biological, social, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual.

 

PSY 1601

Lifelong Learning I

1 Hour

Lifelong Learning, which comes at the end of the degree program, gives students an opportunity to celebrate and demonstrate their achievement and application of knowledge in a personal learning. 

 

 

PSY 1603

Lifelong Learning II

3 Hours

Lifelong Learning, which comes at the end of the degree program, gives students an opportunity to celebrate and demonstrate their achievement and application of knowledge in a personal learning. 

 

PSY 2023

Developmental Psychology

3 Hours

A study of the developmental processes from conception to death with emphasis on the social, emotional, and cognitive changes that occur throughout the life-span.  Significant research and theory and their application will be reviewed.  Prerequisite: PSY1113.

 

PSY 2123

Group Dynamics

3 Hours

A combined instructional and experiential based course focusing on the dynamics of guidance, counseling, and therapy groups and the methods and techniques involved in leading such groups.

 

PSY 2222

Human Relations

2 Hours

Designed to encourage the student to develop greater self-awareness culminating in sensitivity to others (individual and society) and their needs.  The teaching method used in the classroom will necessitate active student participation in a group setting.

 

PSY 2251-2253

Special Studies in Psychology

1-3 Hours

A variety of course offerings providing the opportunity for the student to study designated topics and problems in psychology while developing elementary skills in research and human relations.  Offered when warranted by student interest.

 

 

PSY 2313

Human Sexuality

3 Hours

This course focuses on the understanding of human sexuality from behavioral, cultural, and psychological perspectives.  The course will include anatomy, physiology, and sexual behaviors with an emphasis on healthy sexual adjustment throughout the human life-span.

 

PSY 2323

Psychological Aspects of Multicultural Education

3 Hours

A study of the needs of culturally diverse children, the factors of influence that characterize the child’s environment and an intensive examination of realistic approaches by parents, school, and community to aid one in reaching individual maximal potential in America’s highly urbanized technological society.

 

PSY 2513

Art Therapy

3 Hours

This course will: provide accurate, up-to-date, and factual information about drugs and alcohol; provide experiential art activities that will aid in gaining coping strengths that may include: communication, decision making, refusal, problem solving, and critical thinking; use the art therapy process to gain a better understanding of oneself as well as family dynamics and the various cultures; explore transference and counter transference in the treatment of alcoholism utilizing art therapy. 

 

PSY 3603

Human Growth and Development

3 Hours

This course is a study of the human development from conception through adolescence.  Emphasis is placed upon the developmental phases of children and adolescents and the interrelationships among various aspects of development  physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and spiritual  and emphasizing the many factors influencing development.

 


24.39. RAD - RADIOGRAPHY

RAD 1103 

Medical Terminology

3 Hours

Content provides an introduction to the origins of medical terminology in the areas of nursing, radiography, and sonography.  A word-building system is introduced and abbreviations and symbols are discussed. No prerequisites; 3 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 1112

Introduction to Radiography

2 Hours

This course will provide the student with an overview of the Profession of Radiologic Technology and an Introduction to the Clinical Environment. It covers many basic subjects that are building blocks for the rest of the program. These subjects include introduction to imaging and radiologic sciences, professional organizations, educational survival skills, critical-thinking and problem solving strategies, introduction to clinical education, radiology administration, radiographic imaging, radiographic and fluoroscopic equipment, radiation protection and radiobiology, and human diversity. Prerequisite: Admission into program; 2 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 1114  

Introduction to  Imaging I w/Lab

4 Hours

This course will provide the student with an overview of the Profession of Radiologic Technology and supplemental information to the clinical environment. It covers many basic subjects that are building blocks for the rest of the program. These subjects include introduction to imaging and radiologic sciences, professional organizations, educational survival skills, critical-thinking and problem-solving strategies, introduction to clinical education, radiology administration, radiographic imaging, radiographic and fluoroscopic equipment, radiation protection and radiobiology, and human diversity.

No prerequisites; must be enrolled in course to apply for radiography program; 3 lecture hours & 1 lab hour.

 

RAD 1123  

Patient Care and Education

3 Hours

This course will provide the student with an overview of Patient Care, Ethical and Legal Issues. It cover many basic subjects that are building blocks for the rest of the program. These subjects include ethical and legal aspects, interpersonal communication, infection control, physical assistance and transfer, medical emergencies, pharmacology, and contrast media. Prerequisite: RAD1114; 3 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 1201  

Special Studies: Clinical Remediation

1 Hours

This course is designed to give the student the opportunity to develop professional growth through professional involvement and conducting research directly related to radiography. This course also offers assistance with problem areas in didactic or clinical courses. Prerequisite: Admission to Radiography program; 1 lecture credit hour.

 

RAD 1202  

Special Studies: Critical Thinking in Healthcare

2 Hours

This course is designed to give the student the opportunity to develop professional growth through analytical thought processes. This course will develop the critical thinking skills of the student radiographer through specially designed exercises that are to be completed individually or within a group setting. Prerequisite: Admission to Radiography program; 2 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 1223  

Clinical I

3 Hours

This course is a practical application course of basic skills and knowledge acquired in the didactic portion of the radiography program. Special emphasis is placed on routine radiographic examinations as well as the application of technique and radiograph analysis. Prerequisite: RAD 1114; 3 credit hours; 240 total clinical clock hours.

 

RAD 1224  

Imaging II w/Lab

4 Hours

Content provides the knowledge base necessary to perform standard imaging procedures and special studies.  

Consideration is given to the evaluation of optimal diagnostic images. Prerequisite: RAD1114; 3 lecture credit

 hours & 1 lab hour.

 

RAD 1333  

Clinical II

3 Hours

This is a continuation of RAD1223 (Clinical I) and the skills acquired in the clinical setting by practicing advanced positioning skills in conjunction with RAD1224-Imaging II, is emphasized as well as application of technique and radiograph analysis. Prerequisite: RAD 1223; 3 credit hours; 240 total clinical clock hours.

 

RAD 1403

Radiation Protection

3 Hours

This course will address the beneficial and destructive potential of ionizing radiation. It will provide information necessary for the student to employ effective methods to limit or eliminate those hazards to the patient, general public, and him/herself. It will also provide a general overview of radiation physics, cell structure, and effects of radiation on humans at the cellular and systemic levels, regulatory and advisory limits for human exposure to radiation. Prerequisite: RAD1114; 3 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 2101  

Special Studies: Clinical Remediation

1 Hour

This course is designed to give the student the opportunity to develop professional growth through professional involvement and conducting research directly related to radiography. This course also offers assistance with problem areas in didactic or clinical courses. Prerequisite: Admission to Radiography program; 1 lecture credit hour.

 

 

RAD 2102  

Special Studies: Medicine in Film

2 Hours

This course is designed to present medical issues in the format of film. Students will review movies that have health related issues pertaining to disease, ethics, and pathology. Each student will present a discussion topic and paper that analyzes each film reviewed. Prerequisite: Admission to Radiography program; 2 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 2113

Radiation Physics

3 Hours

This course will provide the student with fundamental concepts of radiation physics and principles relevant to image construction. This course will focus on atomic structure, electromagnetism, electromagnetic radiation, structure of the x-ray machine, x-ray production and emission, photon/matter interactions, image production, computer application in radiography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and image intensification. Prerequisite: RAD1114; 3 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 2153  

Clinical III

3 Hours

This course is a practical application course of clinical practice in continuation of RAD1333 (Clinical II) with emphasis on specialized positioning. Each student will complete fluoroscopic and surgery rotations during this course. Prerequisite: RAD1333; 3 credit hours, 112 total clinical clock hours.

 

RAD 2203  

General Registry Seminar

3 Hours

This course is designed to prepare the Bacone radiography students or other registry-eligible individuals to take the National Registry Exam in Radiography (ARRT). When used in conjunction with references available, this course can help students assess their knowledge and understanding and identify and deficient areas. Class discussion and activities will focus around registry topics and professionalism. Prerequisite: RAD1224 & RAD1333; 3 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 2213

Image Evaluation and Acquisition

3 Hours

This course will acquaint the student with methods used for the application of routine and special technical factors available to radiographers, in order to create diagnostic radiographs. The student will understand how technique can significantly affect image quality. Radiation physics, radiation protection, and quality assurance are interlaced with the principles of radiographic exposure. The student will understand what technical factors can be safely used. Prerequisite: RAD1224; 3 lecture credit hours

 

RAD 2223  

Imaging III w/Lab

3 Hours

This course is a continuation of RAD1224. It is designed to provide the knowledge necessary to perform advanced radiographic examinations. This knowledge shall include: pediatric radiography, trauma radiography, equipment manipulation, basic and special structural positioning, radiographic anatomy of the structure being imaged,      utilization of contrast media, introduction to special procedures, and radiographic film critique. Medical ethics, medical law, patient care, radiation protection and professionalism will also be discussed. Prerequisite: RAD1224; 3 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 2254  

Clinical IV

4 Hours

This course is a practical application course of clinical practice in continuation of RAD2153 (Clinical III) with the opportunity to practice methods of application of  routine and special technical factors and radiograph analysis. Each student will complete a four week evening rotation during this course. Prerequisite: RAD2153; 4 credit hours, 360 total clinical clock hours.

 

RAD 2302 

Special Studies: Ethical Issues in Radiologic Sciences

2 Hours

This course will present biomedical issues in relation to beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice. Topics such as organ transplantation, euthanasia, stem cell research, etc. will be examined. Students will present discussion topics, written and verbal presentations over the pro's and con's of each issue. Prerequisite: Admission to Radiography program; 2 lecture credit hours

 

 

RAD 2305

Radiography Seminar

5 Hours

This course is an online review for the ARRT Radiography Examination through Corectec. There are 15 Lessons, 15 Exercises, 15 Quizzes and 4 Simulated Radiography Exams. This course will attempt to find out and focus on areas in which the student may have deficiencies and prepare the student for the ARRT examination. PREREQUISITE: RAD1123, RAD1224, & RAD2153; 5 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 2313

Digital Imaging

3 Hours

The course will provide the student with necessary coverage, terminology and associated definitions associated with digital imaging systems, including computed radiography (CR), digital radiography (DR), and PACS. This course will describe basic computers, image acquisition guidelines, exposure guidelines, quality control practices, networking and communication principles. Prerequisite: RAD 2213; 3 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 2363  

Clinical V

3 Hours

This course is a continuation of skills practice in previous clinical rotations. Special attention will be given to areas where the student may have deficiencies or, if none, then special attention will be given to the student's special interest area. Completion of all clinical competencies and special rotations.

Prerequisite: RAD2254; 3 credit hours, 360 total clinical clock hours.

 

 

 

RAD 2413

Career Skills

3 Hours

Content will include preparation for the national certification, employ skills, job interview techniques, communication skills, portfolio/resume development, and professional organizations. Prerequisite: RAD2305; 3 lecture credit hours.

 

RAD 2431

Special Studies/Health Science Club

1 Hour

The purpose of this organization is to facilitate communication and support among students interested in a health science profession. The goal is to sponsor various professional activities and social events so that students will be able to share ideas and interact with professionals in the field. Also, the club will provide opportunities for participation in educational and volunteer work on campus and in the surrounding community. Elective, may be used twice for a total of 2 credits.


24.40. REA - READING

REA 2433

Special Studies:  Directed Readings in. . .

3 Hours

Explores advanced readings which allow the application of principles learned in classroom settings in various course genre. Serious intent and capacity to work independently required. Offered when student interest warrants and at the discretion of the Division Chair of Academic Support.

 

REA 3003  

Children’s Literature, Literacy, and Technology

3 Hours

This course is designed to assist pre-service educators in becoming comfortable with the integration of children’s literature and creative/technological arts through a blend of background information, research, historical perspective and contemporary activities. Through providing the basic tools and experiences that teachers need, this course will stimulate the learning process, enrich other subject areas, and provide opportunities for creative expression, inquiry and self-fulfillment. Prerequisites: All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

CROSS-LISTED WITH LIT 3003

 

REA 3103

Literacy, Language, and Cognitive Development of the Young Child

3 Hours

This course focuses on the literacy, language, and cognitive development of young children, ages birth through eight years.  Teacher candidates will have opportunity to apply their knowledge and gain field experience through an in-depth investigation of one child’s literacy and language learning processes.  Prerequisite:  Admission to Teacher Education and 2.5 CGPA.  Criminal History required.

 

 

 

REA 3203

Literacy Development and Assessment I

3 Hours

This course focuses on the development of literacy skills and strategies in kindergarten, first and second grade students within a balanced literacy program based on best practices and integrated with ongoing developmental assessment of learning. Special emphasis is given to the development of literacy skills within the context of word study and orthographic (spelling) knowledge development.  Opportunity is given to apply knowledge through active involvement with kindergarten and elementary age students. Prerequisite:  All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

REA 3303

Literacy Development and Assessment II

3 Hours

This course focuses on the development of literacy skills and strategies in third through eighth grade students within a balanced literacy program based on best practices and integrated with ongoing developmental assessment of learning. Special emphasis is given to the development of literacy skills within the context of word study and orthographic (spelling) knowledge development.  Opportunity is given to apply knowledge through active involvement with upper elementary through eighth grade students. Prerequisite:  All professional education and specialization courses must have a grade of C or above. Criminal history check required and 2.75 GPA

 

REA 3403 

Reading and Writing in Upper Elementary

3 Hours

This course focuses on reading and writing instruction across the curriculum in grades 3-8 within a balanced literacy program based on best practices and integrated with ongoing developmental assessment of learning.  Opportunity is given to learn and apply best practice in literacy instruction through active involvement with upper elementary age students.   Prerequisite:  Admission to Teacher Education, 2.5 CGPA, REA 3203, and REA 3303 (may be taken concurrently with REA 3303).  PASS-PORT Portfolio and Criminal History required.

 


24.41. RME - RECREATION MANAGEMENT

RME 1003

Principles of Recreation Management

3 Hours

Provides an introduction to the leisure and recreation industry and the opportunity to view the area of recreation and leisure programs as piece in a global economy.  Various issues are explored such as history of recreation, public recreation, nonprofit recreation, commercial recreation and tourism, therapeutic recreation, campus recreation, correctional recreation, recreation in the armed forces, faith-based recreation, and other areas.

 

RME 2202

Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports

2 Hours

A study of basic skills, techniques, history, and rules utilized in various individual and dual sports.  Emphasis on application and analysis of principles essential for successful participation in sports. 

 

RME 2232

Introduction to Team Sports

2 Hours

This course focuses on the knowledge and skills related to team sports with an emphasis on developing strategies and performance skills that influence pedagogical content knowledge for teaching K-12 students. 

 

RME 2303

Sport Officiating I

3 Hours

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the rules and techniques of all major sports.  It is especially suited for those intent on officiating and for prospective physical education instructors.

 

RME 2433

Sociology of Sport and Recreation

3 Hours

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the principles, issues, and trends within the American society and its interaction with sport and recreation service delivery systems.

 

RME 3303

Principles of Sport Management

3 Hours

This course examines psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce you to the field of sport and exercise psychology by providing a broad overview of the major topics in the area.

 

RME 3403

Organization & Leadership in Recreation & Sport

3 Hours

This course provides a rigorous investigation as an upper-level course to assist future recreation and sport managers in the art of leadership, organization, and the administration of recreation and sport enterprises.

 

RME 3503

Recreation Management

3 Hours

The purpose of this course is to give a deeper look into the principles, issues, and trends of the organizational and management aspects of sport and recreation management program. Prerequisite: ACC 2113 and MGT 2223

 

RME 3603

Strength and Conditioning Certification Preparation

3 Hours

This course covers basic anatomy and physiology and the training effect, basic muscle anatomy and physiology, basic kinesiology and biomechanics, strength theory, conditioning theory, basic sports nutrition theory, training muscle mass, sports and fitness exercise, Olympic lifting for athletes, weight training technology, special topics in sports and fitness training, sports medicine, and organizing your sports conditioning plan and program. 

 

RME 3703

Personal Training Certification Preparation

3 Hours

This course includes basic anatomy and physiology and the training effect, muscle anatomy and physiology, basic kinesiology and biomechanics, strength theory, fitness theory, training systems and applications introduction, basic fitness nutrition theory, weight technology, sports and fitness exercises, flexibility exercises, communication skills development, special topics in sports and fitness training, and exercise programming for special populations.

 

RME 4993-6

Recreation Administration Internship

3-6 Hours

Professional experience in a recreation environment for qualified students.  Prerequisite:   Advisor


24.42. REL - RELIGION

REL 1003

Introduction to Christianity

3 Hours

Students will gain an understanding of the basic ideas of Christian theology, doctrine, and faiths as they are understood and practiced throughout the world.  Subjects covered will include Christianity’s Jewish roots, the life of Jesus, origin and development of the Christian New Testament, messiahship of Jesus the Christ, the Trinity, the priesthood of all believers, denominationalism, and contemporary Christian traditions, including the American Baptist Church and its contributions to the founding and operation of Bacone College.  All personal religious views will be respected.  BACONE CORE

 

REL 1013

Sociology of Christianity

3 Hours

Sociologists define religion as “a system of beliefs and rituals that bind people together to what they consider sacred.”  Sacred things are those that evoke an attitude of awe and reference.  This course looks at what Christians consider sacred, such as the Bible, the Trinity, the Christian church and ritual sacraments.  Additionally, the course examines how sacred Christian rituals and beliefs have impacted society throughout the past millennium.  All personal religious views will be respected; students will learn the commonly-held beliefs of Christians, the basic differences in beliefs among the three major movements within Christianity (Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestantism), and to identify these various Christian beliefs as they appear in the world today.  BACONE CORE

 

REL 2253

World Religions

3 Hours

This course surveys the beliefs, values, and worldviews of human beings.  By examining the six major world religions that shape our world, students will discover the common and unique aspects of each religion.  By the end of the semester, successful learners will understand and respect the differing religious beliefs of others who share our world. BACONE CORE

 

REL 3113

Christian Ethics

3 Hours

Christian Ethics is an upper division class devoted to the study of Christian ethics and a brief survey of some contemporary moral issues.  We will begin with a short study of the origin of Western and Christian ethical traditions, then study Christian teachings as they pertain to the issues of love, justice, liberty, sin, and salvation.  We will move on to study controversial moral issues such as world views, humanist vs. Christian euthanasia, biomedical issues, abortion, the family, sexual ethics, and the distribution of health care resources.  We will attempt to survey a number of issues within the framework of Christian ethical concerns and morality.  BACONE CORE

 


24.43. SOC - SOCIOLOGY

SOC 1113

Introduction to Sociology

3 Hours

This course is designed to give a general survey of the field of sociology and its newer developments as well as to acquaint the student with the theory and fundamental process of the subject.   

 

SOC 2113

Social Problems

3 Hours

A study of the prominent social problems present in the world.  Special emphasis is placed on American society and on comparing and contrasting different cultural value systems and their approaches to social problems.

 

SOC 2213

Introduction to Social Work

3 Hours

An introduction to the profession of social work, including its purpose, systems of social welfare (e.g. child welfare, corrections, family services, mental health) and methods. 

 

SOC 2223

The Family

3 Hours

A course dealing with family-life education.  The study of human relationships including marriage, individual adjustment, family adjustment, children in the home and values in democratic community living.    

 

 

SOC 2231-2253

Special Studies in Sociology

1-3 Hours

A variety of course offerings providing the opportunity for the student to study designated topics and problems in sociology.  Offered when warranted by student interest.

 

SOC 2333

Social Psychology

3 Hours

This course examines the major theoretical and research traditions in social psychology, including behaviorism, social exchange theory, symbolic interactionism, attribution theory, expectation states theory, cognitive dissonance theory, role theory, group dynamics and norm formation, social power and influence, emergence of group structures and inequalities, and socialization processes.

 

SOC 3103

Family, Schools, and Community

3 Hours

This course focuses on developing knowledge and understanding of the importance and role of families, schools, and communities in the lives of children and the implications for practice in working with children birth through age eight. The course will also focus on developing skills in the application of knowledge in the field.

 


24.44. SPC - SPEECH

SPC 1713

Speaking and Thinking Critically

3 Hours

This course offers an introduction into public speaking and logical argument. Course content includes instruction and practice in writing, developing, and presenting public speeches, engaging in logical argument, and critical thinking. BACONE CORE

 


24.45. SME - SPORT MANAGEMENT

SME 1003

Introduction to Sport Management

3 Hours

This course introduces students to sport management, both as an academic major and as a professional endeavor.

 

 

SME 2113

Sport Facility Management

3 Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the planning and management of sport facilities. The course will focus on elements of planning, design, and management, while examining functions related to maintenance, security, operations, and evaluations.

 

SME 3003

Governing Bodies in Sport

3 Hours

This course is designed to gain a familiarization with the major components of the bodies that govern sport competition.  The bodies include:  recreational associations, the High School Activities Association, the NAIA, and the NCAA.  International bodies such as the International Olympic Committee, FIFA, and the European sport governing bodies will also be explored.  Comparative studies will be conducted to establish the relationship between these bodies and how they affect each other.

 

SME 3103

Ethics in Sport Management

3 Hours

This course is a study of ethics in the business of the sport management. This course will take you through one of largest industries in North America. We will discuss the different philosophies, ethics, and morals in the sport management world. We will look at the different aspects of ethics in different sport management situations.

 

 

SME 3113

Sport Marketing

3 Hours

This course is designed to provide the sport manager with an overview of the major marketing issues facing the sport industry.  Course content focuses on developing basic knowledge and understanding of sport marketing and sponsorship for educational, recreational, and professional settings. This course provides a foundation for marketing in most sport settings.

 

SME 3203

Coaching and Sport Pedagogy

3 Hours

General techniques and concerns dealing with the coaching of an athlete will be covered.  A specific focus will be placed on effective pedagogical skills in coaching, including feedback, use of practice time and fundamental techniques of sport skills.