Student Handbook

1. FERPA Student Rights

Family​ ​Educational​ ​Rights​ ​and​ ​Privacy​ ​Act​ ​(FERPA) 

The​ ​Family​ ​Educational​ ​Rights​ ​and​ ​Privacy​ ​Act​ ​(FERPA)​ ​(20​ ​U.S.C.​ ​§​ ​1232g;​ ​34​ ​CFR​ ​Part 99)​ ​is​ ​a​ ​Federal​ ​law​ ​that​ ​protects​ ​the​ ​privacy​ ​of​ ​student​ ​education​ ​records.​ ​The​ ​law​ ​applies​ ​to all​ ​schools​ ​that​ ​receive​ ​funds​ ​under​ ​an​ ​applicable​ ​program​ ​of​ ​the​ ​U.S.​ ​Department​ ​of Education.

FERPA​ ​gives​ ​parents​ ​certain​ ​rights​ ​with​ ​respect​ ​to​ ​their​ ​children's​ ​education​ ​records.​ ​These rights​ ​transfer​ ​to​ ​the​ ​student​ ​when​ ​he​ ​or​ ​she​ ​reaches​ ​the​ ​age​ ​of​ ​18​ ​or​ ​attends​ ​a​ ​school​ ​beyond the​ ​high​ ​school​ ​level.​ ​Students​ ​to​ ​whom​ ​the​ ​rights​ ​have​ ​transferred​ ​are​ ​"eligible​ ​students."

•​ ​​Parents​ ​or​ ​eligible​ ​students​ ​have​ ​the​ ​right​ ​to​ ​inspect​ ​and​ ​review​ ​the​ ​student's

education​ ​records​ ​maintained​ ​by​ ​the​ ​school.​ ​Schools​ ​are​ ​not​ ​required​ ​to​ ​provide

copies​ ​of​ ​records​ ​unless,​ ​for​ ​reasons​ ​such​ ​as​ ​great​ ​distance,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​impossible​ ​for

parents​ ​or​ ​eligible​ ​students​ ​to​ ​review​ ​the​ ​records.​ ​Schools​ ​may​ ​charge​ ​a​ ​fee​ ​for

copies.

•​ ​​Parents​ ​or​ ​eligible​ ​students​ ​have​ ​the​ ​right​ ​to​ ​request​ ​that​ ​a​ ​school​ ​correct​ ​records

which​ ​they​ ​believe​ ​to​ ​be​ ​inaccurate​ ​or​ ​misleading.​ ​If​ ​the​ ​school​ ​decides​ ​not​ ​to​ ​amend

the​ ​record,​ ​the​ ​parent​ ​or​ ​eligible​ ​student​ ​then​ ​has​ ​the​ ​right​ ​to​ ​a​ ​formal​ ​hearing.​ ​After

the​ ​hearing,​ ​if​ ​the​ ​school​ ​still​ ​decides​ ​not​ ​to​ ​amend​ ​the​ ​record,​ ​the​ ​parent​ ​or​ ​eligible student​ ​has​ ​the​ ​right​ ​to​ ​place​ ​a​ ​statement​ ​with​ ​the​ ​record​ ​setting​ ​forth​ ​his​ ​or​ ​her​ ​view about​ ​the​ ​contested​ ​information.

•​ ​​Generally,​ ​schools​ ​must​ ​have​ ​written​ ​permission​ ​from​ ​the​ ​parent​ ​or​ ​eligible​ ​student

in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​release​ ​any​ ​information​ ​from​ ​a​ ​student's​ ​education​ ​record.​ ​However,

FERPA​ ​allows​ ​schools​ ​to​ ​disclose​ ​those​ ​records,​ ​without​ ​consent,​ ​to​ ​the​ ​following

parties​ ​or​ ​under​ ​the​ ​following​ ​conditions​ ​(34​ ​CFR​ ​§​ ​99.31):

•​ ​​School​ ​officials​ ​with​ ​legitimate​ ​educational​ ​interest;

•​ ​​Other​ ​schools​ ​to​ ​which​ ​a​ ​student​ ​is​ ​transferring;

•​ ​​Specified​ ​officials​ ​for​ ​audit​ ​or​ ​evaluation​ ​purposes;

•​ ​​Appropriate​ ​parties​ ​in​ ​connection​ ​with​ ​financial​ ​aid​ ​to​ ​a​ ​student;

•​ ​​Organizations​ ​conducting​ ​certain​ ​studies​ ​for​ ​or​ ​on​ ​behalf​ ​of​ ​the​ ​school;

•​ ​​Accrediting​ ​organizations;

•​ ​​To​ ​comply​ ​with​ ​a​ ​judicial​ ​order​ ​or​ ​lawfully​ ​issued​ ​subpoena;

•​ ​​Appropriate​ ​officials​ ​in​ ​cases​ ​of​ ​health​ ​and​ ​safety​ ​emergencies;​ ​and

•​ ​​State​ ​and​ ​local​ ​authorities,​ ​within​ ​a​ ​juvenile​ ​justice​ ​system,​ ​pursuant​ ​to

specific​ ​State​ ​law.

Schools​ ​may​ ​disclose,​ ​without​ ​consent,​ ​"directory"​ ​information​ ​such​ ​as​ ​a​ ​student's​ ​name, address,​ ​telephone​ ​number,​ ​date​ ​and​ ​place​ ​of​ ​birth,​ ​honors​ ​and​ ​awards,​ ​and​ ​dates​ ​of attendance.​ ​However,​ ​schools​ ​must​ ​tell​ ​parents​ ​and​ ​eligible​ ​students​ ​about​ ​directory information​ ​and​ ​allow​ ​parents​ ​and​ ​eligible​ ​students​ ​a​ ​reasonable​ ​amount​ ​of​ ​time​ ​to​ ​request that​ ​the​ ​school​ ​not​ ​disclose​ ​directory​ ​information​ ​about​ ​them.​ ​Schools​ ​must​ ​notify​ ​parents and​ ​eligible​ ​students​ ​annually​ ​of​ ​their​ ​rights​ ​under​ ​FERPA.​ ​The​ ​actual​ ​means​ ​of​ ​notification (special​ ​letter,​ ​inclusion​ ​in​ ​a​ ​PTA​ ​bulletin,​ ​student​ ​handbook,​ ​or​ ​newspaper​ ​article)​ ​is​ ​left​ ​to the​ ​discretion​ ​of​ ​each​ ​school.

For​ ​additional​ ​information,​ ​you​ ​may​ ​call​ ​1-800-USA-LEARN​ ​(1-800-872-5327)​ ​(voice). Individuals​ ​who​ ​use​ ​TDD​ ​may​ ​call​ ​1-800-437-0833.