20-21 Bacone College Academic Catalog, last updated July 29, 2020

22. 2020-2021 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

22.25. HIS - HISTORY

HIS 1113

Great Ideas of Western Civilization 

3 Hours

This course introduces students to the intellectual foundations of Western Civilization and the study of the humanities. It surveys the major ideas that dominate Western Civilization from the ancient to the modern world, providing students with an outline of major historical movements of thought and an encounter with some of the principal works of philosophy, religion, literature, arts, and history that form the Western intellectual tradition. It provides students with the concepts needed to succeed in the courses that make up the humanities portion of the general education core curriculum.  CROSS-LISTED WITH BAL1113

 

HIS 2113

Western Civilization I

3 Hours

HIS 2113 Western Civilization I provides a complete overview of the history and culture of Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East from the beginnings of civilization in the 4th millennium, before Christ, to the decline of the Roman Empire and the beginning of Medieval Europe. The course focuses on the ideas, institutions, experiences, expressions, and accomplishments of Western civilization, including politics, social change, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy.

HIS 2123

Western Civilization II

3 Hours

HIS 2123 Western civilization provides a complete overview of the history and culture of Europe and its appendages from the beginning of Medieval Europe through the Renaissance and Enlightenment to the modern world. The course focuses on the ideas, institutions, experiences, expressions, and accomplishments of Western civilization, including politics, social change, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy.

HIS 2223

World History

3 Hours

HIS 2223 World History provides a complete overview of the history and culture of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas from prehistory to the present. The course focuses on the ideas, institutions, experiences, expressions, and accomplishments of world peoples, including politics, social change, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy.

 

HIS 2233

American Civilization I

3 Hours

American Civilization I provides a complete overview of early American history and culture. The course focus on the ideas, structures, and accomplishments of American civilization, including politics, social change and institutions, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy. American Indian and African-American contributions are included. American Civilization I begins during the age of exploration and discovery and proceeds through the colonial period to the age of the American Revolution, and the beginning of the New Nation.

 

HIS 2333

American Civilization II

3 Hours

American civilization provides a complete overview of modern American history and culture. The course focuses on the ideas, structures, and accomplishments of American civilization, including politics, social change, and institutions, art, music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy. American Indian and African-American contributions are included. American Civilization begins during the 19th century antebellum period, and the Civil War followed by the Reconstruction Era, the Victorian Age, the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century, the two world wars of the 20th century, and changes in American society and culture from 1865 to the present.

            HIS 2483

Pre-1865 US History

3 Hours

Pre-1865 US History provides a complete overview of the history of America from colonization to the Civil War. The course focuses on the ideas, structures, and accomplishments of American civilization, including politics, social change and institutions, art music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy. The course examines colonization, Indian resistance to expansion, and the events preceding the Civil War.

HIS 2493

Post-1865 US History

3 Hours

Post-1865 US History provides a complete overview of the history of America from the Civil War on. The course focuses on the ideas, structures, and accomplishments of American civilization, including politics, social change and institutions, art music, literature, religion, science, and philosophy.

HIS 3013

American Indian History I

3 Hours

The dynamics of Indian-European encounters beginning in the early sixteenth century, the impact of Euro-American expansion and the displacement of Indians, Indian resistance, the creation of "Indian territory" and ultimate removal of Indian tribes west of the Mississippi river. Cross listed with AIS 3013.

 

HIS 3023

American Indian History II

3 Hours

The purpose of this course is to present a survey of American Indian history from the 1870s to the present, highlighting the processes by which Europeans and Euro-Americans dispossessed the various Indian nations of their land and identities, as well as the Indians’ efforts to adapt to rapidly changing circumstances. The dynamics of contact, conquest, interrelationship, accommodation, assimilation, and resistance is ongoing, and will be examined from both Indian and non-Indian perspectives (though far greater weight is given to the former). The means by which Indians have preserved their identities and cultures is the keynote to the course, rather than emphasizing the many tragic aspects of their histories..

 

HIS 3113

Oklahoma History

3 Hours

The American frontier in 1840, Indian resistance to American expansion, Indians in the Civil War, railroads and allotment of Indian land, Indians in World War I and II, resurgence of Indian identity and sovereignty in the 20th century. CROSS-LISTED WITH AIS 3023

 

 

HIS 3133

Colonial America

3 Hours

Oklahoma History is a course that fulfills the core curriculum history requirement as well as fulfills three credits for a BA in history or Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies. The course covers the original tribes in Oklahoma, European and American exploration, early settlement, the creation of Indian Territory, the creation of Oklahoma Territory, statehood, missionary work in Oklahoma, higher education in Oklahoma, the consequences of the industrial revolution and urbanization in Oklahoma, and Oklahoma politics. Students read primary source materials and form their own interpretations to explain the motives, goals, and achievements of the people of Oklahoma throughout time.

 

HIS 3213

New Nation United States

3 Hours

The New Nation: United States, 1789-1900 is a course that fulfills the core curriculum history requirement as well as fulfills three credits for a BA in history or Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies. This course examines four periods in American history: Westward Expansion, Antebellum America, the Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution and Urbanization in America. Students will read and learn about the creation of the U.S. government, the expansion of the United States, sectionalism in America, the causes and consequences of the Civil War, the impact of American growth on American Indians, the development of industry, and the consequences of industrialization, particularly the development of new classes, ideas, and cities. Students read primary source materials and form their own interpretations to explain the motives, goals, and achievements of Americans from 1789-1900.

 

HIS 3233

The American Experience of War

3 Hours

This course fulfills the Core Curriculum requirement for history at Bacone. War has always been a part of the American experience. In this course, students will examine the American experience of war, focusing on conflicts of the twentieth century, particularly World War II. American civilization was on trial during the greatest crisis the United States ever faced. Examining a variety of different sources, venues, and media, students will come to an understanding of World War II as a total phenomenon that affected all Americans whether abroad or at home. Course materials will include literature, historical narrative, oral history, autobiography and memoir, art, music, film, documentary, and newsreels.

 

HIS 3333

Poverty in America

3 Hours

Poverty has existed in America for centuries, and was a constant phenomenon in America before the Industrial Revolution, which accentuated poverty and created more hardship among America's poor. Poverty in 20th century America has been reduced in part by government intervention. Social philosophers have theorized about poverty and policy-makers have developed programs to address the causes of poverty and to alleviate its consequences. This course examines social theories and policies, the politics and economics of poverty, the poverty of special groups, and the changes in American poverty over time.

 

HIS 3453

Ancient Mediterranean History

3 Hours

This course examines the multi-faceted history of the ancient Mediterranean—the Egyptians, Hebrews, Hittites, Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans. The primary focus on the course will be on ancient Greco-Roman culture: the city-states of ancient Greece and the expansion of the Roman Empire. The ancient Mediterranean provided the foundation for most of the significant cultural and institutional ideas and structures today, in art, literature, philosophy, government, religion, drama, comedy, architecture, and science. The course considers the expansion of Christianity across the ancient Mediterranean during the first several centuries, anno domini.

 

HIS 3663

Christianity in a Postmodern World

3 Hours

This course explores the history and meaning of Christian thought and behavior focusing in particular on the 20th century when modern thought challenged traditional Christian beliefs and values. The course also focuses on the postmodern challenge of the 21st century to Christian beliefs and values, and the unique role American Indians have played in the history of Christianity.

 

HIS 3693

Special Topics in History

3 Hours

Students will be exposed to the processes of writing creative work and may study both traditional and experimental forms of literature.  Prerequisite: ENG 1113 and ENG 1213 Freshman Composition I and II and/or instructor permission.

 

HIS 4023

History of Science

3 Hours

This course is a survey of the history of science, particularly in Europe and America, beginning in the Ancient World with Greek and Roman scientists, continuing in the Medieval World with European and Islamic scientists, then focusing on the Scientific Revolution during the Renaissance and Enlightenment, the unique applied science in America, and the great scientific discoveries in the physical, life, social, behavioral, and mathematical sciences over the centuries. The relationship between Christianity and science is considered, as is the contributions of indigenous peoples to science.

 

HIS 4223

History of Exploration

3 Hours

History of Exploration is a course that fulfills the core curriculum history requirement as well as fulfills three credits for a BA in history or Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies. Humans are explorers: of life, thought, time, people, places. This course focuses on the latter, the exploration of place, but in the process students will find that explorers of place are also explorers of people, time, thought, life. History of Exploration covers the entirety of recorded human history, beginning with ancient exploration, the exploration of the New World, exploration of different continents, the exploration of the depths of the Earth, the exploration of the Earth’s solar system. Students read primary source materials and form their own interpretations to explain the motives, goals, and achievements of explorers throughout time.